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How to Roast a Guinea Fowl

Updated on October 18, 2015
Freshly roasted guinea fowl
Freshly roasted guinea fowl

Simplicity is the Key to Perfect Roast Guinea Fowl

Guinea fowl is a type of wild game bird, originally from the country of Guinea in West Africa, hence their name. They are now farmed extensively and exclusively for food purposes in a number of countries. They have a very mild gamey flavour and are perfect for those who don't like anything to taste too gamey, or people who have never tasted game by way of an introduction to the game eating experience. Unfortunately - like with so many other cooking ingredients - the cooking process for guinea fowl is often incredibly over-complicated and the bird is not enjoyed at its best. This page will show how to roast a guinea fowl to simple and delicious perfection.

How to Prepare a Guinea Fowl for Roasting

Supermarket bought fresh guinea fowl
Supermarket bought fresh guinea fowl

When you buy a fresh guinea fowl from a supermarket, it is almost certain it will have been cleaned, prepared and made oven ready. All you really need to do is remove any trussing, wash it and pat it dry. You may, however, also want to cut off and discard the parson's nose, especially if you intend roasting potatoes or other vegetables in the cooking juices, as this lets the juices better flow in to the pan.

Note: If you buy the guinea fowl frozen, it must be fully defrosted in the bottom of your fridge before it is cooked. This is likely to take at least twenty-four hours.

Oven ready guinea fowl
Oven ready guinea fowl

It is from this point on that the roasting of a guinea fowl is often made to be ridiculously and unnecessarily complicated. To prepare it for the oven, simply season the cavity with salt and black pepper and lay it breasts side up on a roasting tray which has been lightly oiled with olive oil. Drizzle more olive oil over the guinea fowl and rub it in evenly with your hands. Season well with salt only. Put it in to the oven - preheated to 375F/190C - for twenty minutes per pound in weight and twenty minutes extra. Do not open the oven door during cooking.

How to Check a Guinea Fowl is Properly Cooked

Checking that the juices run clear and that the guinea fowl is properly cooked
Checking that the juices run clear and that the guinea fowl is properly cooked

Just like with chicken or turkey, it is important to establish that the guinea fowl is properly cooked when you remove it from the oven. This is easily done by sticking a skewer in to the thickest part of the thigh and ensuring the escaping juices run clear. If any trace of pink or red can be seen, put it back in the oven for ten more minutes before repeating the same test.

The Guinea Fowl Must be Rested after Roasting

Guinea fowl is rested and ready to be portioned for service
Guinea fowl is rested and ready to be portioned for service

When you have established that the guinea fowl is indeed properly cooked, sit the tray to the side - well out of the way of potential accidents - and leave it to rest for fifteen minutes. After this time, use a carving fork inserted in the cavity to carefully lift it to a chopping board for portioning.

Go Wild With a Wide Selection of Wild Game! - Learn how to prepare all sorts of wild game in the comfort of your kitchen

How to Chop and Portion a Guinea Fowl - The average guinea fowl should provide two decent meal portions

Removing the first leg portion from the guinea fowl
Removing the first leg portion from the guinea fowl

A guinea fowl is not like a large Christmas or Thanksgiving turkey which is carved to serve up to twelve or even more people. One average guinea fowl will provide a good amount of meat for two people and it is best to cut it in to a total of six portions for service. This allows each person a leg portion, a wing and a small breast fillet.

The first step is to carefully slice through the flesh between each thigh and the main body of the guinea fowl and pop the bone from the socket, freeing each leg portion.

Legs have been removed from roast guinea fowl
Legs have been removed from roast guinea fowl

When the legs have been removed, the wings should be removed in a very similar way.

Wings have been removed from guinea fowl
Wings have been removed from guinea fowl

When the wings are removed, it is then time to carefully remove the two breast fillets from the main carcass. Ensure you sit the legs and wings safely to the side on a plate to afford you plenty of room to carry out this procedure.

Removing the breast fillets from the roast guinea fowl
Removing the breast fillets from the roast guinea fowl

Start on one side of the central breast bone and cut in the form of slits, in one direction only, down through the flesh and allowing the bones to guide the knife. Keep going, down over and around the bones for the full length of the bird, until the first breast fillet is removed. Repeat the process for the second breast fillet.

How to Serve the Roast Guinea Fowl - Use your imagination with plating accompaniments

Roast guinea fowl portions ready for plating
Roast guinea fowl portions ready for plating

You should now have two roast guinea fowl breast fillets, two leg portions and two wings. The meat can be served with any accompaniments you would normally serve with chicken. Try roasting some parboiled and cooled potatoes in the guinea fowl juices for a really good accompaniment, while broccoli, carrots and peas all make excellent vegetable plating additions. You may also of course wish to make a gravy with the roasting juices and perhaps some red wine.

Roast guinea fowl - how do you serve yours?

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