ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

How to smoke food

Updated on January 14, 2014

Great Smoked Food is All About The Process

The Preparation of the Meat or Vegetable, the choice of wood and so much more.

I love the smell and flavor of slow Smoked Food cooked on a Bar-B-Q or smoked in your own smokehouse. During the good weather months, I can be found outside with the BarB fired up most afternoons.

As much as I love Bar-B-Q, I have to tell you, there is just nothing that tastes as good as slow cooked smoked food. I do not care if its Roast, Fish, Sausage or Poultry, nothing can beat the taste of Smoked.

This is my small place out back ... The Smokehouse ... so Welcome and Enjoy

What is Smoke Cured Meat

A little insight and history about smoked foods

Curing and smoking meats is an ancient method used for preparing all types of meats. Before refrigeration was available for food storage, this process was a primary food preparation process for enhancing flavor and preventing spoilage. This page offers comments on the process and several recipes are proposed for different poultry species. The same procedures can be modified and used to prepare many other types of meats.

Salt is the main ingredient common to all curing/smoking processes. It contributes to the flavor and texture of the meat, and discourages growth of spoilage microorganisms that could render the meat inedible. Additional ingredients are often used to enhance the flavor and improve the appearance of the finished product. In some cases the addition of sugar counteracts the salty flavor, drying, and toughening that results when only a salt brine is used.

Additional preservatives like potassium nitrate (saltpeter) or sodium nitrate were used in the past to protect against the growth of spoilage organisms like Clostridium botulinum that causes botulism. Today, many people prefer to avoid use of these preservatives due to possible health risks. When nitrates are used, the cured meats exhibit a pinkish color.

The basic ingredients for curing include salt, sugar, preservatives like saltpeter, flavors like sauterne wine and spices like pepper, onion or garlic.

The curing solution and meat are kept cool to discourage possible growth of microorganisms. Temperatures of 35 to 40 degrees F. are ideal during the curing phase. After the curing process is complete, carcasses are removed from the brine and allowed to drain. Additional brine can be removed by rinsing in cool water. Before smoking, allow the carcasses to dry slightly to improve the adhering of the desirable smoked color.

Various woods are used to smoke the meat. Each type of wood contributes a distinctive effect on the flavor and color of the finished product. Woods frequently used include hickory, oak, maple, mesquite, apple, cherry, plum, and peach. Soft woods are never used due to the presence of resinous substances in the woods.

The internal temperature of the meat at its deepest point must reach 160 degrees F. or higher. If this temperature is not attained, additional cooking in a conventional oven is necessary to produce a safe product. Using a cooking thermometer ensures complete cooking. Smoking at 185-190 degrees F. during the first 2-3 hours, followed by lower temper

About Smokehouses from no Frills to Fancy

There are a large number of smokers available today.

The smoker can use wood or charcoal, it can be electric or gas. How should you choose? First you want to look at how often you will smoke foods and the amount you will be smoking at one time. This of course will let you know how fancy and how big you need.

The more traditional the fuel, the more work it is going to be for you. Wood and charcoal need you to keep an eye on them almost constant as you have to keep adjusting the heat. For me, this is a large part of the charm but you may feel its too much work to be worthwhile. If that is the case you want to look into the fancier smokers and choose one that is gas or electric.

You may also choose to build your own smokehouse. If this is the case, you can build a building for large amounts of smoking or you can build a smoker from a trash can. The limits are only set by your imagination.

I have added a Squidoo lens that will help you build a variety of smokehouse styles for the DIYer. These range from a cardboard box smoker to a full size smokehouse, and every size in between. Check out How To Build A Smokehouse

Brinkmann offering great taste at an affordable price

There are many different smoker types that range in price from inexpensive to very expensive. Here is a nice selection that would fit any budget.

Brinkmann #810-7080-T GZ Gourmet Electric Smoker
Brinkmann #810-7080-T GZ Gourmet Electric Smoker

Grill Zone, Gourmet Electric Smoker, Burgundy Color With Grill Zone Decals, Double Grill Electric Smoker, Tall Size, With Front Hinged Door, Converts Easily To An Electric Grill, Separate Base Pan Design For Easy Set Up, Base Pan Houses 1500W Electric Heating Element & Lava Rocks, 2 Chrome Plated Steel Grills For 50 LB Cooking Capacity, Wooden Handles & Porcelain Coated Steel Water Pan.

 

Journey into a Real Traditional Smokehouse

Take a peek inside a traditional smokehouse and watch the process that has existed for centuries.

Hot smoking and cold smoking

Hot Smoking takes a few hours and the idea is to create the smoke flavor and cook the food at the same time. You want the heat in the chamber the food is placed to be between 130 and 180 degrees F. If you are using a Bar-B-Q, you would place the food as far away from the heat source as possible. If using wood or charcoal, you must tend to the heat constantly during the smoking, cooking process.

Cold Smoking takes even longer and often takes days. The food is placed so that there is no heat from the fire. You in fact want the smoke area to remain at room temperature during the smoking process. This is usually between 60 and 80 degrees F. Cooking does not take place during the process and microbes living in the food are not eliminated. For that reason foods that are cold smoked are usually cured with curing-salts. A good example of this would be Ham and Bacon. After they have been smoked for preservation and flavor, they must be cooked before being eaten.

The Combo This is a combination of Cold and Hot smoking. You smoke the foods at a low temperature for a longer period of time and then slowly over a few hours increase the temperature to the 170 degree temperature for cooking. Always check the internal temperature of meats and reach the temperature needed for safe eating.

FOOD SMOKER TIPS FOR BEGINNERS

Always position the food smoker on a level, heatproof surface away from buildings and out of traffic patterns. It's best to find a place away from the house, since smoke aromas can linger for hours.

Weber's Smokey Mountain Cooker Smoker has three grates-one for charcoal and two for food-and a water pan. To prepare the smoker, heap charcoal in the center of the cooking grate, ignite the coals, and when coals have a light coating of gray ash, spread them evenly across the inside of the charcoal chamber. Check recipe for number of charcoal layers needed. If you are using the water pan, place it on the lower bracket of the center ring and fill it with hot tap water. Add seasonings to water, if desired.

Place soaked woods on the coals through the door on the front of the smoker. Keep all vents partially closed for smoke-cooking. Place food on the top and/or middle cooking grate, depending on recipe and food quantity. Arrange food in a single layer on each grate, leaving space for smoke to circulate around each piece. Add 12 to 14 briquettes and as many wood chunks as needed to fire, and replenish water and seasonings.

Weber Chef's Tips for Beginners

Use a meat thermometer to make sure smoke-cooked foods are done but not overcooked. Smoke-cooked foods look different than other grilled or oven-prepared foods. They may be pink or red when completely cooked (applewood especially will make chicken look red, for example).

Use tongs and barbecue mitts to add charcoal, turn meats, refill the water pan, or adjust vents.

Do not use charcoal infused with starter fluid-it can add an unpleasant taste to your smoked foods.

Experiment with different woods and meats until you find the right combination for your tastes.

Start with a small amount of wood to see how you like the flavor, then add more for more intense smoky taste. (Just don't overdo it; too much wood smoke over long periods can make food taste bitter.)

Try combining woods as you get more experienced for unique and flavorful results.

Keep a food smoker's notebook while experimenting. Jot down ingredients, wood amounts and combinations, and results so you can repeat successes. (Unless, of course, you want to keep your best recipes a secret!)

Suggestions courtesy of Weber

Smoked Meat Tip 1

You can warm smoked meat but be careful not to cook it. Simply cover with foil and heat in a low oven.

FOOD SMOKING WOODS CHART

Hickory - Pungent, smoky, bacon-like flavor. - Pork, chicken, beef, wild game, cheeses.

Pecan - Rich and more subtle than hickory, but similar in taste. Burns cool, so ideal for very low heat smoking. - Pork, chicken, lamb, fish, cheeses.

Mesquite - Sweeter, more delicate flavor than hickory. Tends to burn hot, so use carefully. - Most meats, especially beef. Most vegetables.

Alder - Delicate flavor that enhances lighter meats. - Salmon, swordfish, sturgeon, other fish. Also good with chicken and pork.

Oak - Forthright but pleasant flavor. Blends well with a variety of textures and flavors. -

Beef (particularly brisket), poultry, pork.

Maple - Mildly smoky, somewhat sweet flavor. Try mixing maple with corncobs for ham or bacon. - Poultry, vegetables, ham.

Cherry - Slightly sweet, fruity smoke flavor. - Poultry, game birds, pork.

Apple - Slightly sweet but denser, fruity smoke flavor. - Beef, poultry, game birds, pork (particularly ham).

Peach or Pear - Slightly sweet, woodsy flavor. - Poultry, game birds, pork.

Grape vines - Aromatic, similar to fruit woods. - Turkey, chicken, beef.

Wine barrel chips - Wine and oak flavors. A flavorful novelty that smells wonderful, too. - Beef, turkey, chicken, cheeses.

Seaweed - Tangy and smoky flavors. (Wash and dry in sun before use.) - Lobster, crab, shrimp, mussels, clams.

Herbs & spices (bay leaves, rosemary, garlic, mint, orange or lemon peels, whole nutmeg, cinnamon sticks, and others)

Vary from spicy (bay leaves or garlic) to sweet (other seasonings), delicate to mild. Generally, herbs and spices with higher oil content will provide stronger flavoring. Soak branches and stems in water before adding to fire. They burn quickly, so you may need to replenish often.

Vegetables, cheeses, and a variety of small pieces of meat (lighter and thin-cut meats, fish steaks and fillets, and kabobs.

Courtesy of Weber

Cooking With Captain Morgan - How to use Smoke in the art of BBQ.

Awesome video and hey, you get to learn with Captain Morgan!

How to build a Cold Smoker - Great for smoking Cheese and other things

Quick ... Simple ... inexpensive

Smoked Meat Tip 2

Once the smoked meat is open keep it in the fridge, but don't cover with plastic it needs air.

The Finest offerings from Bradley Smokers

Here are some great choices in smokers that offer more features for the person that smokes foods more often.

Bradley Digital 6-Rack Smoker
Bradley Digital 6-Rack Smoker

The new 6-rack Digital Smoker gives you the advanced features of digital technology. Temperature, time, and smoke are now completely controllable so you can decide how much smoke you want, how long your food is going to be smoked for, and at what temperature. This baby is perfect for entertaining, creating gourmet foods in your own home, or just your enjoying flavor that smoking brings all for yourself!

 

My Favorite Recipe - Maple Cured Smoked Salmon

Ingredients

large salmon fillet Brine:

1 quart water

1/2 cup salt

1/2 cup maple syrup

1/4 cup amber or dark rum

1/4 cup lemon juice

10 whole cloves

10 whole allspice berries

1 bay leaf

Preparation

In a medium sized bowl combine all the brine ingredients. Place salmon fillet in a non-metallic dish and cover with the brine. Make certain the fish is completely submersed in brine. Cover and refrigerate for at least two hours. Remove salmon from brine and pat dry with paper toweling. Place salmon, skin side down, on smoker rack and allow to air dry for about an hour.

Smoking Method

Preheat the Smoker to between 150°F and 200°F.

Using Alder cook the salmon for approximately 1-1/2 hours.

Smoked Meat Tip 3

If you hang pieces of ham and beef they can keep

for years, but will be very tough to eat.

How To Smoke Salmon - Lets smoke some wild Alaskan Salmon

Got some salmon to smoke - check this out for techniques to use.

How to Build a Smoker or Smokehouse

Building a Smoker does not need to be complicated or even extremely expensive. If you are semi handy with a few hand tools you can build a smoker today!

If you would like more information on building your own smoker or even a full smokehouse check out my Squidoo Lens "How to Build a Smoker" today!

Naughty Salmon dip

Ingredients:

12 ounces canned salmon

3/4 cup Miracle Whip (may substitute with mayonnaise)

3 oz. of cream cheese

1/4 cup horseradish sauce

1/2 cup diced red bell pepper

1/2 cup diced green onions

1/4 cup diced red onions

2 Jalapeno peppers diced

2 tablespoons Lime Juice

1 teaspoon grated lime

1 teaspoon crushed red pepper

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon black pepper

Throw everything in a food processor and mix in low speed for about five minutes till all the ingredients are nicely mixed.

Cover with wrap and refrigerate for a few hours or overnight for best results.

Serve with Crackers

For more great ways to use your Smoked Salmon visit my Squidoo Lens " Smoked Salmon Recipes"

Click here to visit Smoked Salmon Recipes Today!

Smoked Meat Tip 4

Smoked meats improve with age and are best kept in a dry area. They can hang in the pantry or meat safe and should be washed then dried with paper towel before storage.

How to Make Sausage

One of the easiest and greatest foods to smoke is Sausage. Create you own gourmet sausage at home and control the ingredients and quality.

To Learn More about Making Homemade Sausage on Squidoo

Demonstration of a Stumps GF222CM cooker

The StoveTop smoker is for all seasons and reasons

The idea of smoking your own foods might be appealing yet for many reasons, you do not feel its for you.

Perhaps you never fix enough food at once to make buying or building a smoker practical.

You only want to smoke foods a few times each year.

You prefer smoked foods when you are camping.

You want something that is quicker and easier.

There is a great answer if this is you ... Check out my Lens about

Stove Top Smoking Today!

The Cajun Microwave

Where The Smokehouse meets the Barbecue Grill

Have you ever tried to put a 70 pound pig in your smoker? Tried to smoke cook a couple of Turkeys for dinner and still wanted to let the kids barbecue some dogs? I have and it does not work so well. The Cajun Microwave might just be the worlds greatest answer.

With the simple addition of some accessories you can slow smoke cook your favorite roast while grilling a few burgers and why not rotisserie cook a couple chickens at the same time.

To learn about the Cajun Microwave check out my Lens:

The Cajun Microwave Roasting Box today!

The Polling Place - Your opinion does count

How would you rate this lens

See results

If you are in the neighborhood say hello

Comments or suggestions - things you would like to see added. Let Me know

And Thank you for Stopping By

Smoke House Chat - Lets hear your comments - Suggestions - Just say Hello

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • profile image

      dellgirl 4 years ago

      Its very interesting and nicely done. Thanks for sharing this information and your directions on How to smoke food.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I have some very dry burning Peat which I picked up in the Outer Hebrides last summer.My question is , Can I use the peat instead of wood chippings in my Abu Garcia Smoker ?????????Let me know your views please.TaSchmokin Gezzer

    • askformore lm profile image

      askformore lm 4 years ago

      I love this smoking lens

    • Ronlove LM profile image

      Ronlove LM 4 years ago

      I like this lens!

    • profile image

      folusom 4 years ago

      Thanks so much for the useful info on smoking food. l shall be grateful if you can give me specific tips on how to smoke fish to get best taste. l meant smoking of catfish.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Thank you for the great info on the types of wood and the types of meats to be smoked with them. Very informative!

    • IncomeFromHomeT profile image

      IncomeFromHomeT 5 years ago

      Great lens! And considering that our electrical grid is getting more and more unstable, this information may be very important for all of us in the future.For those who are new to cold smoking and using a more traditional method, using a specially designed humidity gauge in your smokehouse to keep an eye on the humidity levels will help ensure that your meats smoke nicely, color and flavor are preserved, and meats don't get too tough and dried out.Thanks again!

    • profile image

      SerenaHitchens 5 years ago

      This is really informative. I heard about smoking food in my food handling course and this lens made me understand more about this process.

    • profile image

      MHicks 5 years ago

      Hi DMedly, your other lens which is about how to build a smoker is interesting. And this lens complements that other lens of yours. You must be a bbq expert.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Fridge as a Smoker,Keep it plugged in an run the fridge while your smoking! Smoke entry and exit opposite, smoke in at the top, to allow it to be circulated by the fan and cooled, exit (flew) at mid point to bottom to maximize smoke, opposite side from the fan. We have ducted fans as well to create a sort of smoke vortex, thanks to the genius metal worked next door!You can buy extra shelves @ any appliance repair store and or consult a repairman, found that a lot, of shelve parts can be used for more than one model, if not Home Depot/Loews will have coated shelving that works great.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Fridge as a smoker,used to do this all the time, but, we kept the fridge running to cool the interior! Put the entrance @the top to allow any heat to be cooled, on it's way down (heat rises remember) and the flew point opposite the fan, @ least halfway down the side or @the bottom to allow maximum use of the smoke. You can go to any appliance repair store or online to buy more shelves to use as racks or build your own from coated shelving material @ a Loews, or home depot

    • profile image

      cottagerelief 5 years ago

      I lived in Newfoundland for 2 years, and was 3 doors down from the humber river. Every cast you could catch pan size trout. So I took an old fridge, put a hole in the bottom, plugged in a flatplate, took an old maxwell coffee tin, filled it with hickory smoked wood, made my own brine, put a hole in the top of the fridge, and was able to keep the fridge at 140 degrees. Man those trout came out awful tasty. Nice lens

    • profile image

      cottagerelief 5 years ago

      I lived in Newfoundland for 2 years, and was 3 doors down from the humber river. Every cast you could catch pan size trout. So I took an old fridge, put a hole in the bottom, plugged in a flatplate, took an old maxwell coffee tin, filled it with hickory smoked wood, made my own brine, put a hole in the top of the fridge, and was able to keep the fridge at 140 degrees. Man those trout came out awful tasty. Nice lens

    • jtrandall profile image

      jtrandall 5 years ago

      I can't wait for summer to try some of these techniques.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      I'm always open to new suggestions and that's how I came across this site. I just wanted to mention that there is another type of cold smoking that has been passed down to me from my great-grand parents, who were from Croatia. My late father build a smoke house the size of a small shed on our property about a decade ago. Every winter we smoke about 125 lbs of kobasi (call it what you will). Concerning temp. the outside temp cannot be less than 22F or more than 40F for a long period of time. Here in Virginia, I have yet to have that problem if planned well in the winter, but a couple scares none the less. All together, I smoke with applewood for 5-7 days then a day on and a day off of smoke for another week. After about another month of curing inside it is ready to wash, cut and eat as is. I should also add that wine and canning salt are major ingridents in my kobasi.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      I'm always open to new suggestions and that's how I came across this site. I just wanted to mention that there is another type of cold smoking that has been passed down to me from my great-grand parents, who were from Croatia. My late father build a smoke house the size of a small shed on our property about a decade ago. Every winter we smoke about 125 lbs of kobasi (call it what you will). Concerning temp. the outside temp cannot be less than 22F or more than 40F for a long period of time. Here in Virginia, I have yet to have that problem if planned well in the winter, but a couple scares none the less. All together, I smoke with applewood for 5-7 days then a day on and a day off of smoke for another week. After about another month of curing inside it is ready to wash, cut and eat as is. I should also add that wine and canning salt are major ingridents in my kobasi.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      I want to smoke cured bacon slices i got at the grocery store.. do I cold smoke this in my electric smoker at below 100 and for how long. of course I will be cooking it in the house before eating it.. I don't know the temperature or time to smoke it .

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Oven-smoked foods will keep well for at least two days. To store, wrap securely to prevent the smoke flavor from permeating other items in the refrigerator. Just in case your readers might also be interested in dating feel free to visit our site.

    • senditondown profile image

      Senditondown 5 years ago from US

      After reading this, I've come to the conclusion that you should be nominated for the position of "Smoke-Master" General. Good Job! Now I want something to eat!!

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Pecan wood was not listed in your selections of wood for smoking. It brings a sweet smokiness to meats that are smoked in it. there are many other woods that can bring character to a smoked meat.http://mississippicomebacksauce.com

    • LadyCharlie profile image

      LadyCharlie 5 years ago

      great info...good lens...thanks for sharing!

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      Had to revisit, very resoureful lens.

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      blessed by squid angel :)

    • profile image

      cheesebaskets 6 years ago

      Grilling is really fun! Especially if the food really tastes good! Yum2x. cheese shop

    • greenkat lm profile image

      greenkat lm 6 years ago

      Very Informative! Thanks!

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      can some one help with some tips for a rookie smoker lol

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      ok my wife bought me a charcoal grill with a smoker attached to the side of it i want to smoke up some ribs and chicken for the super bowl im very inexperinced help please

    • juditpaton profile image

      Iudit Gherghiteanu 6 years ago from Ozun

      great information, i did not know about the effect of the different wood's on the smoked meat. thank you.

    • profile image

      quicpost 6 years ago

      Great and informative!

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      hi...yesterday i bought a Felissiomo smokers pot and the instructions are in Japanese...help me pls.It has 3 chambers. First layer is a deep pan with a smaller pan for the wood chips...2nd layer is where the grill is and the 3rd is the cover.It looks so easy ans sleek but i am afraid to use it...help me pls.thanks much.eve

    • profile image

      shivg 6 years ago

      really great post , great idea how to smoke meat and i love smoke fish, thanks keep it up Swisher Sweets

    • profile image

      shivg 6 years ago

      really great post , great idea how to smoke meat and i love smoke fish, thanks keep it up

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      someone told us you shouldn't smoke fish & poultry at the same time in the smoker is this true? or doesn't it matter thanks for your help

    • profile image

      RichardWilliams 6 years ago

      @tssfacts: I to prefer using a smoker as apposed to a grill. I have one from Landmann - http://www.landmann-usa.com/vertical-smokers.aspxI think the vertical smokers are a lot better as you can also change the flavors of the meat by placing them in different shelves and let the drippings fall from the top to the bottom.

    • JVandewalker LM profile image

      JVandewalker LM 6 years ago

      Awesome Lens! If you are interested in eating some good tasting fish, check out how to get a great deal on a Big Chief smoker or Little Chief smoker online.

    • Stazjia profile image

      Carol Fisher 6 years ago from Warminster, Wiltshire, UK

      Really useful information for anyone who wants to smoke food. Blessed by an Angel.

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      great lens, love smoke fish.

    • profile image

      tssfacts 6 years ago

      Great article with lots of ideals on how to smoke meat. I personally like using a smoker to do all my meats vs using a grill.

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      Thanks! I love smoked food

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      i like smoke fish... yummy

    • juditpaton profile image

      Iudit Gherghiteanu 7 years ago from Ozun

      i did enjoy your lovely lens, but i did learn also, even if i did smoke already my meats, in a home made smoker. Thank you for the info about the wood chart, it is so useful.5* is well deserved.

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      @anonymous: Youn need to get a high temperature cheese like meat processor use when making cheese flavored hot dogs.

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      I tried smoking slim jims and summer sausage with cheese added to it. How so I smoke summer sausage without losing the cheese I added? It melted away.

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      How do I smoke a tri-tip in an electric smoker?

    • profile image

      gilms012 7 years ago

      I love smoked fish, that's why I'm interested in this lens! Thanks for sharing it with us! Now, maybe I can try cooking my own smoked fish!

    • profile image

      how-to-cook-eggs 8 years ago

      very interesting and helpful thanx. 5

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      I think I just found my favourite bookmark. Theres ome great recipes which I will be trying, I have never thought of smoked corn on the cob, I will throw some in th smokey next time I fire it up. Here's an example of the way I do my Homemade Kabana cheers

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      I would like to smoke chicken pieces for a party this summer. We have only smoked fish in our homemad electric smoker. What are the important things to do? Tempature? time? etc. I will be smoking for about 75 people

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      I need to know if anyone has a recipe to make a honey brown sugar beef jerky recipe that is soft not hard?and how to do it.My husband bought electric smoker last night made jerky.I hated it. tasted like pure salt and really hard.

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      Maybe I am overlooking something here but isn't ham another way to describe a pork roast that is already cured and smoked at the butcher shop?

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      My husband just built his second smoker. My question is how long should he smoke a 15lb cured ham? Any help would be GREATLY appreciated. Thanks

    • Kiwisoutback profile image

      Kiwisoutback 8 years ago from Massachusetts

      Nice work! I have a smoker, but I never took it out of the box. Thanks for the reminder!

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      [in reply to DMedley] Thank you for your insight. Sometimes it's the simple things in life that work best.

    • Dayle Medley profile image
      Author

      Dayle Medley 8 years ago

      [in reply to Chief] Hello, you are not doing anything wrong really. Any smoker that has the heat source built in probably will not be able to cold smoke. To cold smoke the heat source must be separate from the main area. Below is a video "Build a Cold Smoker" You can build these really cheap and you just set it in the bottom of your Cabela - presto - cold smoke.

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      I'm a beginner at smoking. I received a Cabela 4' propane smoker for Christmas and I have not been able to cold smoke. The lowest smoke temperature I can get is 200 degrees. What am I doing wrong? Any help would be appreciated.

    • RolandTumble profile image

      RolandTumble 8 years ago

      Wow. 5*, and lensrolled to my foodie lenses.

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      Great tips for smoking food. I love BBQ. Now i just need to get a smoker.

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      i'm building me a small smoke house for personal use but i would like to smoke 25# venison at a time to freeze some for later do i need to use a water pan when smoking like this or is the water pan for smoking for when ready to eat products such as turkey. chicken ribs et.

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      A tip for all of you who love smoking, I recently tried smoking with wood chunks from a weeping willow, as well as with Crab apple, and dutch elm, they all turned out great, the willow was very mellow, but fragrant, and was not as strong as say hickory or mesquite,the crab apple was much like regular apple but seemed to actually be a little "tangy-er" much like the crab apples. and Dutch elm reminded me of Oak in smell when it burned, but I really cannot say enough how pleasantly surprised I was with Willow. a local friend of mine who is Blackfeet native american, told me the tribes of the plains have long enjoyed willow smoke. imagine that!

    • papawu profile image

      papawu 8 years ago

      Great lens. I am definitely a fan of smoked meats. I do also know the difference between BBQing and Grilling. Low and Slow baby Low and Slow, and I have a preference for Hickory or Apple wood.

    • profile image

      anonymous 9 years ago

      I need some help in knowing how to prepare the wood from green woood to ready to smoke wood. Would anyone be willing to give some advice? Thanks, Amy

    • profile image

      anonymous 9 years ago

      Hi Joe. I've just visited Spain, and discovered acorn sold smoked ham. Man what a feast in the mouth. I live in South Africa, and this is my mission .... to make good cold smoke meat. Can you please give me any tips and plans on how to proceed, form goround level up. Regards.

    • Dayle Medley profile image
      Author

      Dayle Medley 9 years ago

      Joe, I am not sure how you have things set up but I will take a stab at this. First with ribs, I prefer a heat between 200 to 215. Under you ribs put a tray to catch the drippings and add a tray with water near the ribs. The water will help keep moisture in the ribs.Let me know if this works for you.

    • profile image

      anonymous 9 years ago

      I have a treager grill/smoker and when I smoke ribs and I do this for two slabs of St. Louis style the meat is stringy and tough...what am I doing wrong ..I do the rub the night prior and make a great sauce which i mop on the slab evey hour, i cook these two slabs approx 51/2 hours on 180 degrees...Need suggestions

    • profile image

      wendy34 9 years ago

      Fab lens. Awesome information with great resources. Really this lens serves the purpose. I gave you 5*. Thanks for sharing the information. I come across a good informative site about Leasing Buildings on Leasing Buildings Check out this site to find information about Leasing Buildings.

    • RentMyGarden profile image

      RentMyGarden 9 years ago

      I love bbq and smoked foods, too. Great Smoking Tips! For those who do not have a place out back or a backyard to smoke your food I invite you to Rent My Garden.

    • profile image

      HowToGetFreeWebHosting 9 years ago

      I Love Your Lens! 5 Stars! People need good "How To" Information. You're invited to visit my lens too. Anthony

    • profile image

      anonymous 9 years ago

      Awesome lens and a 5 star from me! I'm a meat person myself and I love 'em smoked, too! I loved the info on smokehouses. There's this bit about portable storage buildings that might interest you and others too. It's about movable storage facilities and it could work very well in tandem with smokehouses.

    • LaraineRoses profile image

      Laraine Sims 9 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      I've got to try that "Naughty Salmon Dip" it sounds delicious! 5 stars to you & favorite!!!!

    • profile image

      thomasz 9 years ago

      Interesting lens. Nice info.

    • profile image

      Donna_Fallon 9 years ago

      Hiya5 stars Lens!,Check out my lens on how to lose belly fat.Post Feedback :)Donna

    • profile image

      Barbeque_Rick 9 years ago

      D:I am sorry but I posted a badlink in my previous comment. You should go to How To Barbeque

    • profile image

      Barbeque_Rick 9 years ago

      You have some great tips for beginners. I wished I would have used the interent to look up tips when I started barbequing. I really enjoyed the lens. 5 stars.When you get a chance take a look at my lens How To Barbeque Ribs.

    • profile image

      anonymous 9 years ago

      Thank you all for the information. I was considering purchasing a smoker, which I really cannot afford...now I will make one with a scrapped bbq burner. Thanx again...:)

    • profile image

      anonymous 9 years ago

      Does anyone have a "How to" guide on how to smoke halibut? types of woods I should use, brine, smoking time etc. Thanks for the help

    • SpicySun profile image

      SpicySun 9 years ago

      Hi Nara! Great lens! I can't wait to read more.....Please visit my new lens Spicy Sun Rubs and Dips! It is soooo delicious! Your friend, SPICY!

    • profile image

      anonymous 10 years ago

      Great lens! I voted 5 stars - I invite you to check out mine too, and rate it for me! Live Streaming Video

    • Nara White Owl profile image

      Nara White Owl 10 years ago

      I think I'll get a smoker just to try some of the recipes.

    • schwarz profile image

      Rae Schwarz 10 years ago from Seattle, WA

      I'd like to invite you to add your lens to the Chez*Squid group. http://www.squidoo.com/groups/food

    • Karendelac profile image

      Karendelac 10 years ago

      A favorite cooking method of mine. 5 stars for all the great tips. Please visit me soon. Best wishes,Karen at KarensKinkade Art Store

    • profile image

      datingtips93 10 years ago

      Love this lens. Will use the tips 5/5Nicoledating tips for men

    • profile image

      Aika 10 years ago

      lovely lens! what a great idea, I enjoy reading your infos. :) 5 stars from me!

    • RickByrd1 profile image

      RickByrd1 10 years ago

      Great lens! I like the trash can smoker. 5 stars! I am building a lens about BBQ. Check it out and rate it for me. Also, if you have time vote in the Grate Debate Poll Gas vs. Charcoal.

    • GrillGirl profile image

      GrillGirl 10 years ago

      Thanks for visiting Grill Girl. I came back to visit (-: I'd give you 5 stars again, but I don't think I can do that. Oh well. It's fun to stop by.

    • profile image

      YourSmilingChef 10 years ago

      Great information-packed 5 star lens! I especially love the chart describing the different smoking wood flavor enhancers. That will be very helpful in writing grilling recipes... thanks for sharing.

    • GrillGirl profile image

      GrillGirl 10 years ago

      Hi - from a fellow smoker. This is a wonderful page.

    • GramaBarb profile image

      GramaBarb 10 years ago from Vancouver

      WOW! A super information packed lens. Good work. 5*!Thanks for stopping by https://hubpages.com/food/crockpotcookingdaily

    • profile image

      Bob. 10 years ago

      5 Stars and a lensroll! Very well done and informative lens!

    • profile image

      PotPieGirl 10 years ago

      Just passing thru and wanted to congratulate you on a wonderful lens! Nice job!

    • profile image

      DeWayne-FilmFreak 10 years ago

      I have had smoked salmon and it is delicious! Great lens!DeWayne(FilmFreak)- MovieDownloadMatrix.com -Horror Movie Critic with Fangs!

    • profile image

      anonymous 10 years ago

      Bruce for most fish if you have your temperature between 150 and 200 degress you would smoke/cook for about 1 1/2hrs

    • profile image

      anonymous 10 years ago

      Chuck Roast there are a few variables, type of meat used for the sausage, fat content etc. If you have cooked the sausage during the smoking process and vacum seal the finished product it can be kept for a couple weeks refrigerated.

    • profile image

      anonymous 10 years ago

      How long does it take to smoke fish?

    • profile image

      anonymous 10 years ago

      when you smoke italian sausage or any sausage..for say 5 or 6 hours, the sausage resembles a "smokey" (though thicker). After you have smoked the sausage to a point where it is dry or semi dry, how long will the meat be edible (refrigerated)?

    • TheFleaMarketGuru profile image

      TheFleaMarketGuru 10 years ago

      Well, you know what would happen...any mention of "smoked salmon" brings the bears out of the woodwork!