ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Which insulated bottles work best when making yogurt in a thermos?

Updated on April 16, 2015
ecogranny profile image

A long-time whole grain baker, Kathryn discovered the thrill and ease of cooking with whole, fresh foods decades ago. Still chopping!

Have you been thinking of trying the thermos method to make your yogurt? Not sure which one to get?

When we moved into a small, city apartment, I needed to eliminate some of my appliances. The yogurt maker was one of the first to go, after I discovered the thermos method.

I've been making yogurt in a thermos--well, four of them now--for over ten years.

This Stanley wide-mouth 24-ounce stainless steel bottle is my favorite, perhaps because I've had it since 1987. It's taken a lot of hard knocks!

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Homemade cream-top yogurt in the Stanley. Here, I'm about to line the strainer with some cheesecloth and strain it to make Greek-style yogurt.Yum! Greek style yogurt and whey. I'll use the whey in salad dressings, sauces, or maybe to ferment grains and dried legumes before cooking.
Homemade cream-top yogurt in the Stanley. Here, I'm about to line the strainer with some cheesecloth and strain it to make Greek-style yogurt.
Homemade cream-top yogurt in the Stanley. Here, I'm about to line the strainer with some cheesecloth and strain it to make Greek-style yogurt.
Yum! Greek style yogurt and whey. I'll use the whey in salad dressings, sauces, or maybe to ferment grains and dried legumes before cooking.
Yum! Greek style yogurt and whey. I'll use the whey in salad dressings, sauces, or maybe to ferment grains and dried legumes before cooking.

Which do you think is better for making yogurt--a thermos or a dedicated yogurt maker?

See results

Three reasons I prefer to incubate my yogurt in a thermos

We love homemade yogurt at our house--the superior taste, the fact it has no additives, and that we can make it with organic milk from local, pasture-fed cows.

  • The main reason I prefer my Stanley thermos: It incubates the yogurt perfectly for up to twelve hours.

    We like our yogurt tangy. To get that extra flavor, we incubate it longer than most people--a full twelve hours. This bottle does the job.

    That's because of the double-walled, stainless steel construction. Those walls, with their air pocket between, provide the deep-insulating power we need to keep the yogurt just the right temperature for several hours.
  • The second reason I prefer this thermos and the others you will see on this page: The stainless steel ensures no BPAs or pthalates leach into our yogurt.

    Yes, the lid is plastic, but I don't fill my bottle so full that the milk touches the lid.
  • Third, this method is so easy, you can always have a thermos incubating with another batch chilled and ready to eat in the fridge.

Bonus points: We can turn our homemade yogurt into creamy, rich, fluffy Greek-style yogurt in just four simple steps.

Three more insulated bottles I use to make yogurt

Sometimes I want to make a small batch of yogurt to carry in the car on a trip. Other times, I want to make an extra large batch. Below, you will find the other insulated bottles I use to make my yogurt, in whatever quantity I need.

Like the Stanley, every one of these is double-walled stainless steel, so they make beautiful yogurt. When I'm not making yogurt in them, I'm sipping coffee, tea, lemonade or plain water from them. They have dozens of uses.

Oh, and if you’ve never made homemade yogurt and missed the link above, here it is again: How to make yogurt in a thermos. It's so easy!

The small but efficient JoeMo works well as a travel yogurt maker

This mug holds 14 ounces--just about right for two bowls of granola in the morning.

While the manufacturer says it will keep liquids hot for up to six hours, I have used it several times to make yogurt overnight while traveling, and it kept the yogurt at just the right temperature the entire time.

By morning, we had delicious yogurt for the homemade granola we carried with us. It's a fabulous all purpose mug.

Comes with its own little tea strainer, keeps beverages steamy hot or icy cold for hours. One-hand operation assures ease of use when you're on the go. Just depress the green button and sip away.

The 20-Ounce Klean Kanteen is equally good as a triple-purpose yogurt maker/coffee mug/iced drinks cooler

My 20 ounce hot and cold insulated Klean Kanteen makes just as good yogurt as my Stanley. It's my constant companion in summer months, too.

We like to take it on impromptu picnics, filled with ice, water, juice from half a lemon, and just enough sugar to cut the tart. Refreshing! Plus, it's available in a variety of sizes.

The 48-ounce Thermos makes a quart and a half

When the grandkids are coming for an over-nighter, I make a double batch in this 48-ounce bottle.

Like the Stanley, it is double-walled stainless steel and keeps the yogurt at just the right temperature for the full twelve hours we like it.

I'd love to hear about your yogurt-making adventures. Failures, success stories, your favorite flavor yogurt.

Do you make your own? Hate the stuff, but stopped by to be supportive? I'd still like to hear from you. It's all good.

© 2014 Kathryn Grace

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • ecogranny profile image
      Author

      Kathryn Grace 2 years ago from San Francisco

      @TanoCalvenoa: Thanks Tano. Let me know if you give it a go.

    • profile image

      TanoCalvenoa 2 years ago

      I've not made yogurt like this, but love the idea. I even have a Stanley thermos like the one you show!

    • ecogranny profile image
      Author

      Kathryn Grace 2 years ago from San Francisco

      @RinchenChodron: It's because my city apartment kitchen is so small that I discovered I could eliminate one appliance and make yogurt in a thermos, but I totally understand if homemade yogurt is not your thing. Thank you for taking the time to take a look.

    • ecogranny profile image
      Author

      Kathryn Grace 2 years ago from San Francisco

      @AtlantaGeorgia LM: You're welcome. Let me know if you give it a try. I'm always ready to help the novice yogurt maker!

    • AtlantaGeorgia LM profile image

      AtlantaGeorgia LM 2 years ago

      I was so intrigued by this concept. I've never tried making yogurt but I love that you may do it in a thermos. Thanks for sharing!

    • profile image

      RinchenChodron 2 years ago

      I buy my yogurt - I'm a city girl. Hadn't even heart of making it in a thermos, but it probably saves money and would be fresher. Nice lens.

    • ecogranny profile image
      Author

      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @Brite-Ideas: Wonderful! If you give it a try, let me know how it goes. I'm here to answer your questions, if you have any.

    • Brite-Ideas profile image

      Barbara Tremblay Cipak 3 years ago from Toronto, Canada

      you have me very interest in the idea of making homemade yogurt! I've never tried that

    Click to Rate This Article