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The Creaming Method

Updated on February 1, 2011

The Creaming Method: So, What's the Big Deal?

The creaming method is one of several ways that you can mix ingredients to make a cake or cookies. It is probably the most prevalent method written about in cookbooks, and, when done correctly, the resulting cake will be light and tender. There are many things that can go wrong when using this method, however.

I want to teach you exactly how to do the creaming method. Even more, I want you to understand why you have to combine ingredients in a certain way.

If you've never been able to bake a light and tender cake, today is your day. Learn this method, and the "whys" behind it, and light, tender, melt-in-your-mouth cake will be in your reach. I've included a recipe for basic yellow cake so you can practice the technique. Enjoy!

The Swedish Chef Makes a Cake - Just for Fun!

There is nothing better than The Muppet Show. Nothing. Case in point: I give you The Swedish Chef!

Why Use the Creaming Method? - Why Does it Matter?

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The creaming method is probably the most widely used method of mixing cake batters. Unfortunately, few cook books take the time to explain why they suggest this method. As a matter of fact, cake ingredients can be put together in many different ways, with widely varying results.

Here is a simplified list of the steps involved in the creaming method. First we'll look at why we perform these steps, and then we'll explore how to do them correctly so you get the best possible results.

The Creaming Method

1. Beat fat until light and fluffy.

2. Beat sugar with fat until light and fluffy.

3. Add eggs, one at a time.

4. Alternate adding dry and wet ingredients.

5. Bake.

So, why use the creaming method? The first steps in the creaming method are designed to introduce as many tiny air bubbles as possible into the cake batter. The more thoroughly you perform these steps, the lighter your cake will be.

The next steps involve adding structural ingredients--eggs and flour--in a way that will make the cake tender, but not so tender that it will completely fall apart. These steps are also critical to achieving the perfect texture--you want the cake to be strong enough to stack and ice without falling apart, yet you also want it to melt in your mouth.

The Most Important Thing to Remember About The Creaming Method

All of your ingredients should be at cool room temperature. Not hot room temperature in Death Valley in the summer. Not cold igloo temperature. You're shooting for about 68 degrees, Fahrenheit.

You Really Do Need a Stand Mixer

I promise I'm not just saying this. In order to achieve maximum aeration and volume, you really need a stand mixer. This Kitchen Aid 5-quart mixer will stand you in good stead for years.

While some people like the more commercial look of the type of mixers whose bowls raise and lower, for ease of bowl scraping, ingredient adding and attachment attaching, I prefer this hinged type. The head locks in both the up and down position, so don't worry. Your beater won't come crashing down into the bowl unexpectedly while you're adding ingredients!

This Empire Red version is currently priced at $229.99, not including a $20.00 rebate, but the Kitchen Aid Artisan 5 quart Stand Mixer comes in a wide variety of colors and at price points from $229.99 to $400.00, depending on the merchant.

How to Do the Creaming Method

How to Bake the Perfect Cake

Shortened cakes (cakes containing fat) all contain more or less the same ingredients: flour, sugar, fat, eggs, other liquid, leaveners, flavorings. That's about it, really. Here's how you put all of these ingredients together to make a fantastic cake.

1. Blend dry ingredients together really well. This means flour, baking soda and/or baking powder, and salt. Really well means really well. Use a whisk and blend the dry ingredients together for at least thirty seconds or so. You do this to evenly disperse the salt and leaveners throughout the flour. The more evenly your ingredients are dispersed, the more uniform your rise. Since the leaveners give off gases, you want them to be evenly distributed so they give off their gases evenly. That way, you won't have a very tight crumb in some places and big old holes in your cake in others. This step will also incorporate some air into the dry ingredients. This will assist the rise even further.

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2. Cream butter until light and fluffy. Have your butter at cool room temperature. You want the butter soft enough to whip but firm enough to hold its shape and be able to expand and hold air.

3. Cream butter and sugar together until light and fluffy. "Why not skip step 2?" you ask? It's easier to blend two ingredients with like textures than it is to blend one heavy ingredient with one light ingredient. Sugar is a lighter ingredient than butter--its crystalline structure allows space between all the little grains of sugar. Those spaces are filled with air. Take the time to whip the butter to incorporate some air. You'll be able to cream the butter and sugar together much more efficiently.

Remember that I said you need to keep the butter cool. Well, it will warm up during all the creaming, so keep feeling the outside of the bowl. It should feel cool. If it doesn't rub the outside with a bag of frozen peas to cool things off again. Not elegant, but it works. You could also throw the bowl in the fridge for a few minutes.

Cream on medium speed for at least three to five minutes. At least. You want the butter and sugar to increase in volume. What's happening during this time? The sugar crystals are tearing little holes in the butter. The holes are filling up with air. In order to achieve the best rise in the oven, you'll want the maximum number of little air holes possible. This takes time, so wait for it.

4. Add eggs, one at a time. Mix each one in thoroughly before you add the next one. You're making an emulsion--butter and water (from egg whites) are being held together by the emulsifiers in the egg. Emulsions take time, so only add one egg at a time. Make sure your eggs are at cool room temperature. If you throw eggs in the butter/sugar mixture straight from the fridge, you'll just make your butter all hard again. Then it won't be stretchy and plastic anymore. Then, it won't hold onto its air bubbles. Then you'll be sorry. So, to keep the butter nice and pliable your eggs should be at about 68 degrees, same as the butter.

Anyway, add them one at a time. Make sure that your butter and sugar are as light as you can get them, because once you add the eggs, the mixture won't increase in volume anymore. Make sure the eggs are evenly blended into the batter. Scrape the sides of the bowl a couple of times to make sure the structural proteins in the whites and the emulsifiers in the whites get evenly distributed throughout the batter.

5. Mix your water/milk/buttermilk--whatever your liquid is--with any flavorings, such as vanilla extract. Stir this together really well.

6. Add about 1/2 of your dry ingredients to the mixer. Mix in slowly until just combined.

7. Add 1/2 the liquid. Mix in until just combined. Add the other half of the liquid. Mix in until just combined.

8. Add the rest of the dry ingredients. Mix in until just combined.

So, what's up with steps 6-8? Why not just add everything at once? Why not mix fast? Introducing water (as water or milk) can start to activate the gluten in the flour. We want some gluten activation so the cake doesn't fall apart, but we don't want so much that we end up with a chewy cake. Mixing half the dry ingredients in first, when there is very little water in the batter (only from the egg whites) allows you to mix thoroughly and have only minimal gluten development. Adding the liquid in two stages and mixing in between allows a little more gluten to develop without ruining the emulsion that you took pains to make back in step 4. Adding the last of the flour at the end smooths the batter out, and since you're adding it at the end, you won't have to mix very much, so you end up limiting gluten formation that way, too.

What you should end up with is thick, airy batter. It shouldn't pour into pans. You should have to scrape it into the pans. You've done it! Beautiful cake batter made with the creaming method!

Scrape the Bowl While You Mix! - The Beater Blade for Kitchen Aid Mixers

These beater blades replace your regular paddle attachment. The little fins continuously scrape the bowl. That means no more stopping to scrape with a spatula, saving you time and effort while mixing the batter more thoroughly. It's a win-win!

Original Beater Blade for 5-Quart KitchenAid Bowl Lift Mixer, KA-5L, White, Made in the USA
Original Beater Blade for 5-Quart KitchenAid Bowl Lift Mixer, KA-5L, White, Made in the USA

I'm not normally big into gadgets, but this Beater Blade saves some serious time. I used to have to stop and scrape the bowl at least three or four times while mixing. Now, I just use this replacement paddle and the fins do all of the work!

There is a Beater Blade available for all 5-quart tilt-head mixers and 6-quart lift mixers as well.

 

You Need to Learn the Creaming Method - That's me, The Online Pastry Chef, by the way!

This video focuses on the steps of The Creaming Method. As an added bonus, it includes an absolutely wonderful recipe for sour cream pound cake.

Basic Yellow Cake Recipe - Make This Using the Creaming Method

For you, a basic recipe for yellow cake. Use the creaming method. I'll walk you through it. I'll remind you of all the steps and talk about all the ingredients. Then, you should be able to make almost any cake with nothing but a list of ingredients!

Basic Yellow Cake

13 oz. sifted cake flour

1 tablespoon baking powder

1 teaspoon salt

8 oz (2 sticks unsalted butter) at cool

room temperature

2 cups sugar (weigh it once, and you'll never have to use a measuring cup for sugar again)

4 large eggs plus 1 yolk

2 teaspoons vanilla

8 oz. whole milk

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees, F. Grease and flour 2 9" cake pans. You can line the bottoms of the pans with parchment, too. That will make it even easier to get the cakes out of the pans.

1. What are the dry ingredients? cake flour, salt, baking powder. Whisk them together very very well. This recipe calls for cake flour because it is very low in protein and is very finely milled. This will provide you with a tender cake with a fine crumb. Cake flour is also slightly acidic. This will help the proteins in the eggs to set quickly. You can use all purpose flour, but use a one with very low protein, such as White Lily, in order to achieve the most delicate texture. Regular all purpose flour will work just fine, but the cake won't be quite as tender.

2. Cream that butter by itself until it is very light--it will be fluffy and will lighten in color because of the air you're whipping into it. Remember, if the bowl doesn't feel cool, whip out your frozen peas, or just put the bowl in the fridge for awhile.

3. Add the sugar and continue creaming. Don't rush it, and go at medium speed.

4. This recipe calls for an extra yolk. This will make the cake more tender and velvety. You can leave it out, but you'll like it better with it in. Add the eggs one at a time. Scrape the bowl well between additions and make sure everything is well blended.

5. Combine the milk and the vanilla and stir well.

6. Add half of your flour mixture and mix until incorporated.

7. Add 1/2 the liquid. Mix just until combined. Add the other half of the liquid. Mix just until combined.

8. Add the rest of the flour and mix until just combined.

You're doing this to get a good ratio of tenderness to toughness. Add the liquid before you add the flour, and you'll develop too much gluten. Add all the flour at once, and you might end up with a cake that's too tender.

Spread the batter evenly into the pans. You might even want to weigh them to make sure they weigh the same. That way, you know they'll be done at the same time.

Bake the layers in the center of the oven until the tops are light golden brown and the center springs back when you press lightly on it. A knife or a cake tester inserted into the center of the cake should come out clean. Since I don't know what oven you'll be using, I can't give you a time when they'll be done. Check at about 20-25 minutes and go from there.

When done. Let cakes cool in the pans for 10-15 minutes. This will give the starches in the flour time to set up some. Then, run a knife around the inside of the pans and invert to turn out. Invert again and cool right side up on racks.

Good Cakes Start with Good Ingredients

Give some of these a try.

You Really Do Need a Kitchen Scale - Once you weigh, you won't go back.

This is the scale I use at home. It;s the Escali Primo Digital Multifunctional Scale, a very big name for a compact scale! The best thing about the Escali is that it has a tare function. This means that you can add an ingredient and then push a button, resetting the readout to zero. That means you don't have to do math when adding the next ingredient!

For dry ingredients especially, weight is much more accurate than volume. I do encourage you to purchase a kitchen scale and use it. You won't believe how much time you'll save not having to scrounge around for all of your measuring cups. For less than $30, it might be the best investment you ever make in your kitchen!

For Baking and Pastry Advice... - ...Check out my Baking Videos on YouTube.

I try to upload at least on baking and pastry video a month, so check back often at My YouTube Channel For a look at my philosophy of cooking and baking, watch my introductory video now. Since the first video, I've added more lighting and much better sound:)

Another Useful Resource for Aspiring Bakers

Visit Pastry Methods and Techniques for loads of information on ingredients, ingredient function and tips on making your baking better than ever.

To Learn More About The Creaming Method... - ...and the Science of Baking in General

You can't go wrong with Bakewise. This is Shirley Corriher's long-awaited follow up to Cookwise. If you are interested in the science of baking and learning some insiders' tricks--all based on sound scientific principles--you must buy this book.

Have a question about the creaming method? Ask it here. Better yet, if you learned something from this lens, let me know! Any and all comments are much appreciated.

Comment About The Creaming Method?

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    • VBright profile image

      VBright 8 years ago

      You can tell just by looking at that picture of the cake batter that it improves the quality of the cake! Thanks for the helpful information!

    • jfield profile image
      Author

      jfield 8 years ago

      [in reply to vbright105] I'm on a mission. Armed with a little know how, everyone can be an awesome baker!

    • OhMe profile image

      Nancy Tate Hellams 8 years ago from Pendleton, SC

      I want that big piece of chocolate cake and a glass of milk right now. Great lens and it makes me soooo hungry.

    • jfield profile image
      Author

      jfield 8 years ago

      [in reply to OhMe] Thanks, OhMe:) Just doin' my job. Can I pour the milk for you?!

    • KimGiancaterino profile image

      KimGiancaterino 8 years ago

      Yummy lens! I agree that a KitchenAid mixer is worth every penny. I sure love mine. Welcome to Culinary Favorites From A to Z.

    • ElizabethJeanAl profile image

      ElizabethJeanAl 8 years ago

      My favorite cake is Italian cream cake. I haven't made it in years. My cakes are good, but they are not great. Thanks for the tips

      Lizzy

    • manila lm profile image

      manila lm 8 years ago

      hi Jenny,

      very informative lens. Delicious photograph and recipe for the yellow cake. Your website as I have mentioned b4 is cool too. 5* for this lens.

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      Oh wow! I am so hungry now. I love cream, but who doesn't? This is going to sound silly but I have a "magic bullet" (mini food processor) and I make my own whipping in cream in it all the time. There couldn't be anything worse for my big (__[__)! LOL Great lens idea. Huge fan! 5 stars!

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      My Mom taught me to make cakes this way, just because. Now I understand why. Cool.

      Plus now I have a stand mixer which makes a ton of difference. No more tired hand mixer arm. :-)

    • Dianne Loomos profile image

      Dianne Loomos 7 years ago

      Ah, now I see why my cakes don't raise properly! Thanks for the information.

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      good cakes start with good ingredients and a clear simple to follow recipe.

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      Errrrrrrrrr. My cupcakes sank in the middle. Lots of bubbles. I am an experienced baker. Have been baking for 30 years. I am looking for the bomb digity vanilla cupcake recipe.

      I have made a million different recipes. This one tasted like egg yolk to me. I usually follow a recipe (baking) the first time I make it then experiment. I hate wasting good ingredients.

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      Aha, I know why my cupcake was a flop/ The recipe above calls for 13 ounces of flour ( a little over 1 1/2 cup of flour if measuring by cup) The recipe on the link "Online Chef" calls for 1 lb 5 ounces. 2 cups plus 5 ounces. Should have gone with my gut. I will try once more and see how it turns out. :-)

    • jfield profile image
      Author

      jfield 6 years ago

      @anonymous: Hi, Diana. Sorry these didn't work out for you. If you don't like the egginess, you can certainly leave out the extra yolk. I'm looking at your math for cups-to-ounces, and the only things that you can weigh that are the same volumetrically and by weight are water, milk and whole eggs. Everything else--especially flour-type ingredients--cannot be interchanged in that way. I weigh my cups (by volume) of flour out at between 4 and 4.5 oz (by weight). When making cake, I always go with 4 oz, to end up with the lightest product possible, texture-wise. So, my 13 oz of flour is roughly 3 cups of flour by volume. That's why I use a scale. Much less guess-work. Hope your second try works out better! :)

    • profile image

      Shookies 6 years ago

      As a fellow pastry chef, I greatly enjoyed your article on the creaming method. You thoughtfully provided explanation and examples of what could/would happen if one were to do different steps in the process. I look forward to reading more from you.

    • profile image

      Shookies 6 years ago

      As a fellow pastry chef, I greatly enjoyed your article on the creaming method. You thoughtfully provided explanation and examples of what could/would happen if one were to do different steps in the process. I look forward to reading more from you.

    • jfield profile image
      Author

      jfield 6 years ago

      @Shookies: Thank you! That's really my whole raison d'etre on Squidoo and writing my blog&website. Not enough attention is paid to the hows and whys of baking. I aim to change that. I appreciate your kind comment! :)

    • profile image

      Shookies 6 years ago

      You're very much welcome! :)

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      I am SO looking forward to trying this recipe! I just got my upgrade KitchenAid today AND I have been looking for a GREAT yellow cake recipe!

      Thank you for explaining the details...now it all makes sense!

    • jfield profile image
      Author

      jfield 6 years ago

      @anonymous: I'm so glad you found your way here, and I'm glad I was able to help! Enjoy your KitchenAid! And remember, The Creaming Method works on almost any kind of butter cake you can imagine, so find your favorite recipe and go to town!

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      I just made this recipe, and I'm VERY excited! I should have asked this question BEFORE I did it, but, chalk it up to experience: 13 oz of flour by weight or by measure? Also, should the milk be room temperature also?

      Thanks!!

    • jfield profile image
      Author

      jfield 6 years ago

      @anonymous: Good questions, LouAnn:) 13 oz. by weight it is. This translates to about 3 cups of flour, but since a cup of flour can weigh between 3.5 and 5.5 ounces, depending on how you fill it, weight measurement is much more accurate. And yes, all ingredients should be at room temperature, although the milk can be a wee bit cooler since you won't be introducing it until you have some dry ingredients in there. It's more important that the eggs be at room temp since they'll be going in when all that's in the bowl is basically sugar and butter. Cold eggs will make your butter seize up, and that's Not Good!

      Hope the cake turned out well. Take care:) Jenni

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      the flavor was outstanding, but it came out dry. Is it possible I over baked it? I checked at 20 minutes, it was soupy. 15 minutes, barely browned. 27 minutes, I think it over baked.

      The texture was good, not tough, so I know I didn't over mix it. In fact, I mixed most of the last of the flour mixture in by hand, more like folding.

    • jfield profile image
      Author

      jfield 6 years ago

      @anonymous: If your texture was good, that's more than half the battle, so good for you! I'm not really sure why it came out dry. Did you bake in the middle of the oven? Was it dry when it was still warm, or was it dry at room temp? A good trick for keeping a cake moist is to bake it, let it sit in the pan for about 10 minutes, and then turn it out and immediately wrap it in Saran wrap and freeze it. Sounds weird, I know, but all the moisture that usually escapes as steam will condense in the freezer and stay in the cake, keeping it nice and moist.

    • sushilkin lm profile image

      sushilkin lm 6 years ago

      Thanks for sharing.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      question about baking

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      What is the weight of sugar you use? You say 2 cups, but then say to weigh it...or does it not matter so much with sugar compared to flour?

      Thanks!

    • jfield profile image
      Author

      jfield 5 years ago

      @anonymous: That's a very good question. Since white sugar doesn't compact like flour, it is less critical to weigh it, although it is often easier to weigh rather than scoop and level off. I weigh my sugar at 7 oz per cup. Hope that helps:)

    • jfield profile image
      Author

      jfield 5 years ago

      @anonymous: I'm not sure I can answer that w/o knowing your entire recipe and procedure, but I would check the date on your baking powder to see if it has expired. Also, make sure to fully cream the butter and sugar until very light and fluffy and almost white in color. The more air you can beat in during the first stages, the higher your rise will be.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      hi and thank you for this instructional. i have a recipe for a savory cake that is not very detailled re the batter. tried it once and didn't really rise as i wished.

      the ingredients are:

      - 3 eggs

      - 200g all purpose flour

      - 7g dried yeast

      - 100g melted (!) butter

      - 10cl cream

      - 100g grated parmesan

      - salt

      the recipe just says "mix all the ingredients as to obtain a homogeneous batter"

      now, from what i read here, next time i shall cream the butter first, then cream the eggs in and then incorporate dry (flour/yeast/salt) and wet (cream) alternatively.

      would appreciate any additional tips

      thanks.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      hi and thank you for this instructional. i have a recipe for a savory cake that is not very detailled re the batter. tried it once and didn't really rise as i wished.

      the ingredients are:

      - 3 eggs

      - 200g all purpose flour

      - 7g dried yeast

      - 100g melted (!) butter

      - 10cl cream

      - 100g grated parmesan

      - salt

      the recipe just says "mix all the ingredients as to obtain a homogeneous batter"

      now, from what i read here, next time i shall cream the butter first, then cream the eggs in and then incorporate dry (flour/yeast/salt) and wet (cream) alternatively.

      would appreciate any additional tips

      thanks.

    • jfield profile image
      Author

      jfield 5 years ago

      @anonymous: This is a yeast-raised bread, so the creaming method would not be a viable option, especially w/the melted butter (which I figure you already knew because of that exclamation point)! This seems to be a pretty rich (fatty) bread, and I don't see any real liquid in it other than the water contained in the egg whites and cream. As such, it will take a really long time for the yeast to activate and raise the dough. What I would do would be to make sure that all the ingredients--even the eggs and cream--are at room temperature and then mix everything together, cover and let sit in a warm-ish place (in the oven w/just the pilot light--for gas--or just the light on in an electric oven) until the dough volume doubles. This could take a few hours. Then, press the gases out of the dough, shape it and put it in whatever you're baking it in. Let it rise again for an hour or so, and then bake.

      If it still doesn't work, I'd sacrifice a bit of fat and replace the cream with water. Let the yeast dissolve in the water with maybe a pinch or two of sugar, and wait until it gets foamy on top. Then, mix the dough and proceed as I suggest. Good luck with it!

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I baked three cakes this week to find the best yellow cake. One used the creaming method, and two the dump the wet on the dry method. I found that the one that use all purpose flour with the dumping method to be a bit dense and very moist. Everyone I asked liked that one best. I don't think it rose up properly and want to use the same ingredients, but try the creaming method. It was a recipe that used a bit of oil with the butter. The recipe that creamed the butter and sugar rose up nicely, but was a bit dry. What is the difference between a cake that uses the dump method to the creaming method as to the results of the baked product?

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      what are the quantities and functions of the ingredients? thankyou.

    • jfield profile image
      Author

      jfield 4 years ago

      @anonymous: I'm not sure I understand your question--you mean the quantities of each ingredient used to make a cake/cookies w/the creaming method? It depends upon what you want the final result to be. Sugar adds sweetness, browning and tenderness. Fat carries flavor, assists w/the rise (the creaming part), browning, tenderizing. Flour adds bulk and structure. Eggs do some of all of the above. Leavening adds bubbles for rise. Please let me know if you need more information; I'll be happy to help if I can.

    • jfield profile image
      Author

      jfield 4 years ago

      @anonymous: I am very sorry I haven't gotten to your questions sooner, Elaine. Excellent questions that go straight to the heart of understanding mixing methods.

      The cakes you made that were wet-on-dry were made using The Muffin Method. The hallmarks of this method include very little gluten formation, a rather large, uneven crumb, and moistness. I love all those things. In a muffin. But in a cake, The Creaming Method will provide a cake as an end product: even rise, a nice balance between structure and tenderness, a tighter crumb. As you note, the creaming method provides a very nice rise. This partly has to do with the creaming of the butter and sugar together to make a ton of tiny holes in the fat. Those holes later fill up with gas, some from expansion as the air already present gets hot, and some from the extra gases provided by the leaveners. A creamed cake will be slightly more dry than a muffin because the additional agitation caused by mixing in the liquid in stages alternately w/the flour allows for a bit more gluten formation.

      If you are looking for a method that provides both a "cake texture" and moistness/tenderness, consider applying The Two-Stage Method to your ingredient list. The Two-Stage Method ensures that the flour is well coated with fat before adding too much liquid. This inhibits gluten formation and leads to a tender cake. It won't rise quite as high as a creamed cake, but the difference is pretty negligible. Here's a how-to: http://pastrychefonline.com/2009/01/06/the-two-sta...

      Another thing you can--and should--try regardless of whether you stick w/the creaming method or prefer the two-stage method: Once the cakes are out of the oven, have cooled a few minutes and been "turned out," immediately wrap them tightly in plastic wrap and throw them in the fridge or freezer to cool to room temperature. This method traps moisture that would otherwise be lost through evaporation during the cooling process. It makes a huge difference, and I promise that you will not end up with a soggy cake.

      Hope this helps, and again I apologize for my tardy response.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Hi Jenni! Thank you so much for the creaming method instructional. I'm a little confused though because I have read different things about the creaming method. I have read that the creaming method (a) incorporates air into the cake, causing it to be lighter and fluffier; and (b) allows your cake to have a nice, tight crumb. These two things are contradictory, aren't they?

      The other day I had the best cupcake ever: it had a fine, tight crumb and was dense enough that it had a wonderful resistance to it. It wasn't dense like a pound cake, but it definitely wasn't "boxed cake mix fluffy." How do you create a crumb like that? Do you use the creaming method? Cake flour instead of AP flour? Unfortunately this was a cupcake that I had at a birthday party so no recipe was given. Can you help? I'm dying to recreate it!

    • jfield profile image
      Author

      jfield 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Great question, Michelle! I would agree that the creaming method yields a lighter cake because of the incorporation of air. The tight crumb? Not so much (unless you're talking pound cake which doesn't contain as much leavener as a regular butter cake). I would say that it creates and *even* crumb, which is not the same thing.

      The method I'd suggest you use to achieve a fine crumb and a melting tenderness w/enough structure to stand up would be The two-Stage Mixing Method. You can use this method on any ingredient list for a creaming method cake, and vice versa. Here's how to do it. http://pastrychefonline.com/2009/01/06/the-two-sta... I hope this yields the texture you're looking for!

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      This wuz very helpful towardz mee......(: Sooo thnx!

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      Lanikazi 3 years ago

      My yellow cake had large air holes in it. What number of a 5 quart Kitchen said would you say is low, medium, and high (1 to 8)?

    • jfield profile image
      Author

      jfield 2 years ago

      @Lanikazi: So slow getting back to you; I apologize. I would say that 1 is low, 8 is high and 3-4-5 would be medium speeds. I hope that helps

    • profile image

      Lynnette 2 years ago

      Just order my first Kitchenaid stand mixer, so excited, can't wait. Thank you for all this good information, and tips.

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