ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

The Timer is a Cook's Best Friend

Updated on August 30, 2017

Now What?

It is the morning of Thanksgiving Day. You have put the turkey in the oven to bake for some time. But how much time exactly? 20 minutes? 2 hours? You know the right amount of time your (of course) delicious and stuffed-with-spices turkey must cook, but how to measure it? There are several ways to do it. Look at the clock, every so often; try the turkey with your finger every 10 minutes or so, or just look at it without going away anywhere. You don't want to do any of those things. You have to meet the guests, send out invitations, and much more things. The turkey can't remain unattended, and so can your guests. Here is where the timer comes in. Just put in the time you need, and you're all set! But when it comes to choosing kitchen timers, things can get a little tricky. Either you get a fun, decorative, and functional timer, either you get just a gray, uninteresting, but also fully functional timer. Which one to choose? Most people would agree with the decorative clock, wouldn't you?

Review of a Cute Owl Timer - Highly Recommended!

This type of timer is in a tiny and adorable owl with gigantic eyes and a little nose to keep track of how much time is left. Of all the time that I've had this timer, it did not break and always had a loud and clear "voice" when the time was up, and is definitely a great timer!

Kikkerland Owl Kitchen Timer, Assorted Colors
Kikkerland Owl Kitchen Timer, Assorted Colors

This type of timer is in a tiny and adorable owl with gigantic eyes and a little nose to keep track of how much time is left. Of all the time that I've had this timer, it did not break and always had a loud and clear "voice" when the time was up, and is definitely a great timer!

 

Plain or Fun?

What would you rather have, a plain timer or a fun timer?

See results

Plain or Fun Debate!

What timer, plain or fun?

Chess Players Needed a Timer too! - History of the Chess Timer

In 1834, some chess players were actually happy that their time to play was unlimited, because that way one could physically wear out the other by sitting in one spot, thinking of a move for an hour. For example, the match between Howard Staunton and Pierre St. Amant lasted FOURTEEN AND A HALF HOURS, but had only sixty-six moves! As I said earlier, the game was more to physically wear out his/her opponent than to win, so the the average chess match lasted about NINE hours. Sounds remarkable, doesn't it?

After Staunton and Amant's match, a French chess player named Alexandre Deschapelles criticized the players, therefore announcing his thoughts about wasting time at chess matches. Later, an anonymous person named A. Cantab wrote, “Let each player have a three-hour sandglass at his elbow and a friend on either side to turn it. While the player is thinking, the sand must be allowed to run; while his opponent is thinking, his glass will be laid horizontally on the table and the running suspended.” It was a good idea, it was used, but the sand clock was still inaccurate, because the sand could change due to humidity and temperature. The friend of the player could also turn the sandglass the wrong way and that would ruin the whole match.

Finally, in 1883, the mechanical timer was invented and was starting to be used. The "tumbling clock" was actually two clocks set up on a balance beam. If one finished his/her move, they would move their clock down the "balance beam", therefore stopping the clock from counting off the time, and automatically his/her opponent's clock would start ticking away. It was a genius invention by Thomas Bright Wilson, and has helped the chess community ever since, even with our modern technology.

Any other kinds of timers you'll want to add?

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No comments yet.