ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

10 Chocolate Dessert Recipes to Delight Your Sweet Tooth

Updated on March 7, 2017
Margaret Schindel profile image

Margaret has a passion for cooking, baking and creating recipes to satisfy her cravings for delicious, indulgent and sometimes healthy food.

Luscious Dessert Recipes for Chocolate Lovers Only!

Here are 10 of the best chocolate dessert recipes you'll ever have the pleasure of baking, personally selected by a lifelong chocoholic. Many of them are quick and easy to make but taste as though they took hours and a lot of skill to prepare. A few take more time and effort, but the results are well worth it, especially to celebrate a holiday, birthday, or other special occasion.

These fabulous chocolate desserts for giving your sweetheart a special treat or for ending a romantic meal with a decadent dessert. Why wait for Valentine's Day?

Bon appétit!


The 10 Best Chocolate Dessert Recipes | Margaret Schindel
The 10 Best Chocolate Dessert Recipes | Margaret Schindel

Maggie's Chocolate Truffle Brownies

Like the candy after which they're named, my decadent chocolate truffle brownies are rich, chewy, gooey and satisfying.

I highly recommend using one of the brandy, whiskey or liqueur options listed in the recipe. The alcohol burns off in the oven but its taste remains and substantially intensifies the richness of the chocolate. If you prefer to omit the liquor or liqueur, double the amount of vanilla extract.

Freshly baked fudge brownies
Freshly baked fudge brownies | Source

Serving Size

Serves: 16

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter plus extra to grease pan - at room temperature
  • 4 oz. good quality unsweetened chocolate (NOT dark or semisweet)
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract (not imitation)
  • 3 tablespoons cognac, Jack Daniels or Cointreau OR 4 tablespoons Chambord black raspberry liqueur
  • 2 extra-large or 3 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 1 1/3 cups granulated sugar
  • 3/4 cup all-purpose flour (unsifted and preferably unbleached)
  • 1 cup MINI semisweet chocolate chips or coarsely chopped dark chocolate (NOT unsweetened)

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F and butter an 8-inch square metal baking pan. (Do not substitute cooking spray for the butter when greasing the pan.) Cut or tear off a length of baking parchment paper about 6 inches longer than the width of the pan and center it over the pan, smoothing it down over the buttered bottom and two sides of the pan so that there is a little extra parchment paper overhanging two opposite sides (which will serve as handles to help you lift the baked brownies out of the pan later on). Crease the parchment at the edges of the pan so that the paper conforms smoothly to the bottom and sides.
  2. Melt the butter and unsweetened chocolate together in a 4-cup Pyrex glass measuring cup, microwaving it for 30 seconds, stirring, and repeating until they are completely melted. Set aside to cool for 5 minutes and then stir in the vanilla and the cognac (or other liquor or liqueur) until well blended.
  3. Place the sugar into the bowl of an electric mixer. Turn the mixer on low speed and add the chocolate mixture slowly and gradually. Then turn up the mixer speed to medium and mix for about 25 seconds. Scrape the mixer bowl with a rubber or silicone spatula.
  4. Turn the mixer back on at low-medium speed and add the eggs one at a time, allowing about 10 seconds of mixing after each egg is incorporated before adding the next. Scrape the bowl and then blend for another 15 or 20 seconds until the mixture is very smooth.
  5. Turn the mixer to low speed and add the flour very slowly, followed by the mini chocolate chips, just until incorporated. Then turn off the mixer, remove the bowl and mixing paddle (beater blade), scrape the batter from the paddle/blade into the bowl, and finish mixing by hand, scraping the sides and bottom of the bowl well to mix in any unincorporated flour. The batter will be very thick.
  6. Spread the batter evenly in the prepared pan and bake for 28 minutes. (The batter in the center of the pan still will be slightly undercooked but will firm up as it cools.)
  7. Place the hot pan of brownies on a rack and allow them to cool for 10 minutes, then use the parchment paper "handles" to carefully lift the baked brownies out of the pan and place them back on the rack (with the parchment paper still under them) to continue cooling for 1 hour.
  8. Cut the brownies into sixteen 2-inch squares. Place them back in the baking pan and cover the pan tightly in heavy-duty aluminum foil. Leave the tightly covered pan on the counter overnight so the flavors can develop.
  9. Serve at room temperature and store the brownies airtight.

Love My Truffle Brownies Recipe? Please Rate It!

5 stars from 1 rating of Maggie's Chocolate Truffle Brownies Recipe

"Chemically speaking, chocolate really is the world's perfect food."

— Michael Levine

The World's Most Divine Hot Chocolate is Served at Cafe Angelina in Paris

When I was in Paris many years ago, I had the chance to taste for myself the world famous hot chocolate served at the renowned Angelina café on the elegant Rue de Rivoli. So I can tell you firsthand that Angelina's hot chocolate, Chocolat Chaud L'Africain accompanied by its own individual crock of freshly whipped cream, is without question the most decadent form of drinkable chocolate imaginable. There's a reason that for many decades people have flocked from all around the world for a taste of Angelina's thick, dark, intense hot chocolate brew. It's unlike anything else you've ever tasted.

Café Angelina in Paris
Café Angelina in Paris | Source

Not Your Grandmother's Hot Cocoa

This is an incredibly sophisticated hot chocolate tailored to adult tastes, nothing like the tame cups of hot chocolate milk with marshmallows or whipped cream that we grew up on as children. Lest you think I'm a hot chocolate snob, I love a good cup of traditional hot cocoa as much as the next person, especially on a cold winter's night. But it's simply not in the same league as the unctuous, luxurious, heavenly molten chocolate, so intensely flavored and rich that it must be savored slowly in small sips rather than simply drunk like a more ordinary beverage.

I've scoured the web for years searching out the authentic recipe for Angelina's Chocolat Chaud L'Africain, knowing full well in my heart that she would be crazy to divulge her secrets. But I've sample a number of recipes that purport to be THE Angelina's hot chocolate recipe and several of them very close, indeed, to what I remember from all those years ago in Paris. I've combined and tweaked them a bit to come up with my own version of the recipe for Hot Chocolate L'Africain from Angelina Paris.

Hot Chocolate L'Africain Recipe à la Angelina's Café, Paris

This fabulous hot chocolate recipe makes the next best thing to the authentic Chocolat Chaud L'Africain at the world-renowned Angelina café on the Rue de Rivoli in Paris.

A cup of the world-famous hot chocolate l'Africain at Angelina café in Paris.
A cup of the world-famous hot chocolate l'Africain at Angelina café in Paris. | Source

The chocolate you use determines the richness and smoothness of your prepared hot chocolate, so for this recipe use the best quality dark bittersweet chocolate made with 70% to 72% cacao that you can find and afford. Valrhona, Callebaut, Ghirardelli, Scharffen Berger and Guittard all make excellent dark bittersweet chocolate in the 70% to 72% cacao range.

To serve this Hot Chocolate L'Africain the way it is served at Angelina, divide the hot chocolate mixture among four small chocolate pots or pitchers and divide the whipped cream among 4 custard cups or small individual crocks (piping it into the custard cups with a pastry bag fitted with a large star tip, if desired). Place a pot of chocolate, a crock of whipped cream with a serving spoon, and an empty cup and saucer at each place setting and serve immediately.

Oh là là — c'est si délicieux!

Serving Size

Serves: 4

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups heavy cream - divided (do not substitute whipping cream or light cream or half and half)
  • 2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon powdered confectioners sugar - divided
  • 1/4 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 3 cups whole milk (do not substitute 2% fat or 1% fat or skim milk)
  • 1 lb. (16 oz.) chopped 70% to 72% cacao bittersweet chocolate

Instructions

  1. Prepare the whipped cream: Measure 1/2 cup of the heavy cream into the bowl of your electric mixer. Chill the cream in the bowl and the mixer's wire whisk attachment until they are extremely cold. (Note: If you prefer, you can substitute a small bowl and a wire balloon whisk for the electric mixer bowl and wire whisk attachment, if you're up for some strenuous arm exercise.) Sift 1 tablespoon of powdered confectioner's sugar through a small wire mesh sieve onto the chilled cream (in the chilled bowl) and stir it in along with the vanilla extract. Whip the chilled cream mixture immediately in the chilled bowl with the chilled wire whisk, starting at slow speed so the cream mixture doesn't spatter and gradually increasing the speed as the cream thickens. Stop the mixer as soon as the cream starts to achieve stiff peaks, about 3 to 4 minutes total. Do not overbeat the cream or you will end up with sweetened vanilla-flavored butter! Refrigerate the whipped cream while you prepare the hot chocolate.
  2. Prepare the hot chocolate: Stir together the remaining 1 cup of heavy cream, the remaining 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon of powdered confectioner's sugar, and the whole milk in a heavy saucepan. Heat the mixture over medium-high heat just until bubbles form around the edges. Stir in the chopped chocolate until melted, returning the pan to low heat if necessary to finish melting the chocolate. Blend the mixture over low heat with an immersion blender for 1 to 2 minutes.
  3. Pour the hot chocolate into 4 large cups and serve with large dollops of the fresh whipped cream. Or, to serve the hot chocolate the way it is served at Angelina, divide the hot chocolate among four small pitchers, divide the whipped cream among 4 small custard cups or small individual crocks, piping it into them with a pastry bag fitted with a large star tip, if desired, and place a pot of chocolate, a crock of whipped cream with a serving spoon, and an empty cup and saucer at each place setting. Serve immediately.

Enjoy a Vicarious Taste of the World's Best Hot Chocolate at Angelina's in Paris

Chef Gordon Ramsay's Chocolate Molten Lava Cake Recipe / Hot Chocolate Fondant

Sometimes a recipe is absolutely perfect as is, and even I am not tempted to tinker with it to try to improve it! World-famous restaurateur and celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay's recipe for Hot Chocolate Fondant — AKA Chocolate Lava Cakes or Chocolate Molten Lava Cakes — is one of those recipes.

Chocolate Lava Cake / Molten Lava Cake
Chocolate Lava Cake / Molten Lava Cake | Source

Serving Suggestions for Hot Chocolate Fondant

Gordon Ramsay serves his hot chocolate fondant with vanilla ice cream and caramel sauce. I serve my molten chocolate lava cakes with slightly softened vanilla ice cream and raspberry coulis (see recipe below) and also fresh raspberries, when they're in season. A sprig or two of fresh mint on each plate makes a lovely garnish.

Hot Chocolate Fondant is one of Chef Ramsay's favorite dessert recipes and has become one of mine. I dare say that once you make it, it will become one of your favorite chocolate dessert recipes, too!

Here is Gordon Ramsay's Hot Chocolate Fondant recipe courtesy of the BBC Good Food website, and a slightly different version of his Hot Chocolate Fondant recipe from the 4Food section of Britain's Channel 4 website. Enjoy!

Quick and Easy Raspberry Coulis Recipe

Raspberry coulis is a sweet, tart, intensely flavored, puréed and strained raspberry sauce that's a fabulous foil for anything chocolate - cake, pudding, pie, etc. It's also absolutely delicious served over ice cream, fresh or poached fruit, angel food cake, and countless other desserts.

Pastry chefs keep it on hand in a condiment squeeze bottle to decorate dessert plates as well as to sauce their creations.


A bowl of raspberry coulis sauce
A bowl of raspberry coulis sauce | Source
  • Cook time: 10 min
  • Ready in: 10 min
  • Yields: Makes about 1 3/4 cups.

Ingredients

  • 12 oz. bag of frozen raspberries (dry packed - no syrup)
  • 2/3 cup of superfine sugar
  • 3 tablespoons water
  • 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice OR kirsch (cherry brandy) OR framboise eau-de-vie (raspberry spirits) OR creme de framboise (raspberry liqueur) OR creme de cassis (black currant liqueur)

Instructions

  1. Thaw the frozen raspberries. Combine the superfine sugar and water in a small saucepan and place over medium heat for 5 minutes, stirring frequently, to create a syrup. Allow the syrup to cool slightly. Tip: If you don't have superfine sugar you can buzz 3/4 cup of granulated sugar in the blender or food processor until the sugar crystals are very fine, then measure out 2/3 cup.
  2. Pour the thawed raspberries and their accumulated juices into a blender or food processor and process them briefly. With the motor still running, slowly pour the syrup through the opening in the blender lid or the feed tube of the food processor and blend or process the mixture until the berries are fully puréed.
  3. Strain the raspberry purée through a fine mesh sieve, pressing hard to get as much of the pulp through the mesh as possible so that only the dry seeds remain. Stir in the lemon juice, cherry brandy or fruit liqueur.
  4. Refrigerate the raspberry coulis in a tightly covered container until you're ready to serve it (for up to 5 days) or freeze it for up to several months and then thaw it in the refrigerator when ready to use.

Additional Uses for Raspberry Coulis / Pureed Raspberry Sauce

For a quick, easy, and delicious dessert that's lighter and healthier than most, place some poached peaches over a scoop of rich vanilla ice cream, pour on a generous amount of raspberry coulis and call it Peach Melba. It's even better sprinkled with a few toasted, sliced almonds. Yum!

You also can mix raspberry coulis with some fresh strawberries and use it to fill freshly baked biscuits for strawberry shortcakes, to be served with a generous dollop of freshly whipped and lightly sweetened cream. Raspberry coulis also is delicious over fruit sorbet or coconut sorbet (of course, I always grate some dark chocolate over the top!).

I always keep frozen raspberries in my freezer and use them very often to make raspberry coulis . If you're a raspberry lover too, make this super easy sauce just once and I'm betting you'll start doing the same!

Watch Chef Gordon Ramsey Teach Young Chefs to Make His Hot Chocolate Fondant Recipe (AKA Molten Chocolate Lava Cakes) on His Popular TV show "The F Word"

The greatest tragedies were written by the Greeks and Shakespeare...neither knew chocolate.

— Sandra Boynton

The Best Dark Chocolate Fondue Recipe with Honey and Cognac

I started making chocolate fondue in the mid-1970s when I was in college. Back then I used the recipe on the milk chocolate Toblerone bar package. As I got older and my tastes became more sophisticated, I developed my own version using dark chocolate Toblerone bars with a touch of honey and cognac. Everyone who has tasted it agrees that my decadent recipe produces the best dark chocolate fondue on the planet! It's the perfect end to a romantic meal on Valentine's Day or to add a luscious touch of romance and sensuality to any meal on any day.

A pot of warm dark chocolate fondue with strawberries and cake squares for dipping
A pot of warm dark chocolate fondue with strawberries and cake squares for dipping | Source

Dark Chocolate Fondue Recipe, Suggested Dippers, Etiquette, Traditions and More

I'm so crazy about about this luscious dessert that I wrote an article about it that includes not only my dark chocolate fondue recipe but also detailed suggestions for delicious dipping tidbits, fondue etiquette, fun traditions, the best fondue pots and much more to help you get the most out of the experience.

Why wait to add a little romance to your evening? Make The Best Dark Chocolate Fondue with Honey and Cognac for your sweetheart tonight!

Chocolate Throwdown!

We devoted chocoholic have strong feelings about our personal preferences for dark vs. milk chocolate. Chime in and let the world know where you stand.

Do you prefer dark chocolate or milk chocolate?

Milk chocolate is for kids! For serious chocoholics, the darker the better. I won't touch anything with less than 70% cacao!

Milk chocolate is for kids! For serious chocoholics, the darker the better. I won't touch anything with less than 70% cacao!

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Margaret Schindel 2 years ago from Massachusetts

      @MelRootsNWrites, I've taught myself to enjoy darker and darker chocolate over a period of years. At this point, like you I also chocolate that isn't as sweet and has a hint of bitterness. Endangered Species makes a wonderful 88% cacao dark chocolate bar I recommend highly. Thanks so much for your visit and your comment!

    • Melody Lassalle 2 years ago from California

      Dark chocolate, no contest. I prefer the less sweet flavor and a little bit of bitterness. Plus, as lactose intolerant, I can find many types of dark chocolate that I can still enjoy.

    • Margaret Schindel 2 years ago from Massachusetts

      @Victoria Lynn, that's exactly how my taste for chocolate evolved, too! :)

    • Victoria Lynn 2 years ago from Arkansas, USA

      I liked milk when I was a kid. Now, the darker the better! Yum!

    • Margaret Schindel 3 years ago from Massachusetts

      @Andromachi: I agree - I'm now a dark chocolate girl all the way! :)

    There's a reason they call it "bittersweet" chocolate. Who wouldn't prefer the velvety taste and texture of milk chocolate?

      0 of 8192 characters used
      Post Comment

      • Margaret Schindel 3 years ago from Massachusetts

        @David Stone1: There are no really BAD choices in chocolate, but some definitely are better and more decadent than others! ;)

      • David Stone 3 years ago from New York City

        Dark. Milk chocolate's good too, but the quality of the popular brands ain't good.

      • Margaret Schindel 3 years ago from Massachusetts

        @ecogranny: There's no such thing as a bad choice when it comes to chocolate! ;)

      • Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

        Milk chocolate. Gotta have my sugar fix with my chocolate fix!

      • Margaret Schindel 3 years ago from Massachusetts

        @Meganhere: Meganhere, my husband doesn't have that much of a sweet tooth either, although he can't resist my chocolate desserts. ;)

      Pain Au Chocolat

      Pain au chocolat is a glorious, warm, buttery croissant with a wide vein of melted bittersweet chocolate running through the center. Biting through the crisp, flaky layers and into the molten chocolate river within is simply heaven for the senses!

      To fully appreciate the sinfully lusciousness of a pain au chocolat, it should be enjoyed with cup of strong, rich café au lait, the way it is served in the French cafés where it is a menu staple. Mmmmmm....

      Two Authentic Pain au Chocolat Recipes ... Plus a Yummy Shortcut!

      Pain au chocolat
      Pain au chocolat | Source

      If you have the time, energy and inclination, you can make delicious, authentic French pain au chocolat from scratch using the fabulous Pain au Chocolat recipe by famed patissier François Payard courtesy of Saveur magazine or the Pain au Chocolat recipe from chocolatier Jacques Torres courtesy of FoodNetwork.com.

      Otherwise, instead of making a superb but time-consuming authentic puff pastry dough, you can substitute frozen puff pastry. Just make sure to use top-quality bittersweet chocolate for the center so no one notices that you've "cheated" on the croissant dough! Here's one version of this shortcut Petits Pains au Chocolat recipe courtesy of Bon Appétit magazine via epicurious.com.

      "There is nothing better than a friend, unless it is a friend with chocolate."

      — Linda Grayson

      A Twist on Traditional Chocolate Rum Balls for the Holidays

      In the 1960s and 1970s, chocolate rum balls and, to a lesser extent, chocolate bourbon balls were wildly popular, and they remain a familiar treat at family holiday parties. Over the years I have been developing my own versions and experimenting with various flavors of liqueur in place of the rum or bourbon.

      Chocolate rum balls - the original recipe on which my chocolate bourbon balls and chocolate Chambord balls variations are based
      Chocolate rum balls - the original recipe on which my chocolate bourbon balls and chocolate Chambord balls variations are based | Source

      One Recipe Makes Two Flavors

      One of my favorite variations is made with chocolate wafer cookies and Chambord black raspberry liqueur. Those and my Chocolate Bourbon Balls usually are part of my very special holiday cookie assortment that I have been making as gifts to my family and closest friends for many years, which includes about a dozen different delicious varieties of holiday cookies including my fancy Italian Ribbon Cookies and my grandmother's melt-in-your-mouth rugelach cookies.

      I make both Chocolate Bourbon Balls and Chocolate Chambord Balls at the same time using the following recipe.

      Chocolate Bourbon Balls and Chocolate Chambord Balls Recipe

      Be sure to plan ahead so you can make these delicious sweet treats at least five days ahead of time so the flavors can meld and mellow. It makes a huge difference in the taste!

      This recipe makes several dozen of each flavor of liquor balls. If you coat them in a mixture of powdered sugar and confectioners sugar or in finely chopped, toasted nuts, they will keep in the refrigerator for up to 3 weeks or in the freezer for up to 6 months. They're nice to keep on hand in the freezer for unexpected company. If you coat the Chocolate Chambord Balls in melted chocolate, you can store them in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks, but don't freeze them. In either case, take the balls out of the refrigerator or freezer a couple of hours before serving and let them warm up to room temperature for optimal flavor, texture, and mouthfeel.

      My version of these traditional treats makes half chocolate bourbon balls and half chocolate Chambord balls. (Chambord is a truly delicious black raspberry liqueur from France. Try some mixed with club soda over ice with a generous squeeze of fresh lime juice for the adult version of a raspberry lime rickey. Yum!) Feel free to substitute rum for the bourbon and/or Grand Marnier for the Chambord if you prefer. If replacing the Chambord with Grand Marnier, use only half as much liqueur.

      Notes on Ingredients: For best results, you'll want to use high quality cocoa, cookies, nuts, liquor or liqueur, and chocolate and coconut oil if you are coating the Chocolate Chambord Balls with melted chocolate. I recommend buying nuts in bulk from Whole Foods Market, since they will be fresher and tastier than what you can buy prepackaged at the supermarket, and it's also a good source for high-quality chocolate and coconut oil (which will be solid in cool or cold weather and liquid in warm or hot weather). You should be able to buy the cookies at your local supermarket and Jack Daniels, good bourbon, and/or Chambord liqueur at your favorite liquor store.

      Ingredients

      • 4 cups powdered confectioners sugar (divided)
      • 1 cup toasted and finely chopped pecans (or walnuts)
      • 1 cup toasted and finely chopped hazelnuts (or almonds)
      • 2 1/4 cups finely crushed vanilla wafers such as Keebler Vanilla Wafers (approximately 60-68 cookies)
      • 2 1/4 cups finely crushed Nabisco Famous Chocolate Wafers (approximately 56 cookies)
      • 4 tablespoons plus 1 cup unsweetened cocoa powder (divided)
      • 1/2 teaspoon ground allspice
      • 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
      • 1/4 tsp. salt (divided)
      • 2 tablespoons molasses
      • 2 tablespoons honey
      • 1/4 to 1/3 cup Jack Daniels whiskey or good bourbon
      • 1/3 to 1/2 cup Chambord liqueur (French black raspberry liqueur)
      • 3 oz. dark or bittersweet chocolate - chopped (or use mini bittersweet chocolate morsels)
      • 1 tsp. room temperature virgin coconut oil (or room temperature butter or vegetable shortening)

      Instructions

      1. Make the Chocolate Bourbon Balls dough: Stir together the following ingredients in a large bowl until thoroughly mixed: 1½ cups confectioners sugar, the toasted and chopped pecans, the finely crushed vanilla wafer crumbs, 2 tablespoons of cocoa powder, the ground allspice and 1/8 teaspoon salt. Combine the molasses and the Jack Daniels or bourbon and then stir this mixture into the dry ingredients until blended thoroughly. Cover tightly and chill the dough for 2 hours.
      2. Make the Chocolate Chambord Balls dough: Stir together the following ingredients in a large bowl until thoroughly mixed: 1½ cups confectioners sugar, the toasted and chopped hazelnuts, the finely crushed Nabisco Famous Chocolate Wafer crumbs, 2 tablespoons of cocoa powder, the ground ginger and 1/8 teaspoon salt. Combine the honey and the Jack Chambord and then stir this mixture into the dry ingredients until blended thoroughly. Cover tightly and chill the dough for 2 hours.
      3. Form and coat the Chocolate Bourbon Balls: Remove the chilled Chocolate Bourbon Balls dough from the refrigerator and form it into 1-inch balls. (I highly recommend using a 1-inch scoop or melon baller.) Stir together 1/2 cup confectioners sugar and 1 cup cocoa powder and sift the mixture onto a large, shallow plate, platter or dish. Roll the Chocolate Bourbon Balls in the sugar-cocoa mixture until they are generously coated. Place a single layer of the coated Chocolate Bourbon Balls in the bottom of a large, tightly covered food storage container. Top with a piece of wax paper cut to fit and add a second layer of the balls. Repeat with the remaining balls, layering them between sheets of wax paper. Cover the container and store in the refrigerator for at least 5 days.
      4. Form and coat the Chocolate Chambord Balls: Remove the chilled Chocolate Chambord Balls dough from the refrigerator and form it into 1-inch balls. (I highly recommend using a 1-inch scoop or melon baller.) Line two large baking sheets with baking parchment. Melt the chopped dark chocolate (or mini chocolate morsels) with the room temperature coconut oil in a small bowl over a small saucepan of barely simmering water, stirring frequently. Remove the saucepan from the heat. Drop one of the Chocolate Chambord Balls into the melted chocolate and quickly lift it out by sliding the tines of a fork under it. Gently scrape off the excess melted chocolate on the side of the pan and then place the dipped dough ball onto one of the parchment-lined pans. Repeat with the remaining Chocolate Chambord Balls, spacing them a little apart on the parchment-lined baking sheet. Refrigerate the coated balls, uncovered, until the chocolate coating hardens. Then place them in a tightly covered container in single layers separated by sheets of wax paper, as you did with the bourbon balls. Refrigerate for at least 5 days before serving to let the flavors blend and mellow.
      5. To store and serve the balls: The Chocolate Bourbon Balls may be stored in the refrigerator for up to 3 weeks or moved to the freezer and stored frozen for up to 6 months. When ready to serve, remove the desired number of balls from the freezer and place them on a serving plate. Allow them to come to room temperature for at least two hours before serving.The chocolate-dipped Chocolate Chambord Balls can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks. When ready to serve, place the desired number of balls on a serving plate and allow them to come to room temperature, uncovered, for at least 2 hours. Note: If you wish to freeze the Chocolate Chambord Balls for longer storage, omit the melted chocolate coating and instead roll the balls in finely chopped, toasted hazelnuts (or almonds, if that's what you used in the dough).

      The Perfect Sarah Bernhardt Cookies Recipe

      I love almond macaroons almost as much as I love chocolate. Sarah Bernhardt Cookies consist of a crisp almond macaroon cookie base topped with a rich chocolate mousse filling and enrobed in premium quality bittersweet or semisweet chocolate. After much looking, I finally found The Perfect Sarah Bernhardt Cookie Recipe, refined and perfected by someone who loves Sarah Bernhardts as much as I do, San Francisco Chronicle food writer Jacqueline Higuera McMahan.

      She stresses the importance of using the best quality chocolate you can afford. It's worth splurging on good chocolate to get luscious results that will make your investment of time and effort worthwhile.

      Get yourself some best-quality bittersweet or semisweet chocolate and make a batch of The Perfect Sarah Bernhardt Cookie Recipe as soon as you possibly can. You and your nearest and dearest (assuming you can bear to share them) will thank me, I promise!

      Two Tips for Making Sarah Bernhardts:

      I picked up two cool ideas from Martha Stewart's recipe for Sarah Bernhardt Cookies. First, instead of spooning the chocolate filling onto the almond macaroon bases, pipe the filling onto the bases with a pastry bag fitted with a 1/4-inch tip and form each mound of filling with a nice peak at the top so that when the cookies are coated in the melted chocolate they resemble large Hershey's Kisses. Very pretty! Second, instead of dipping them into the melted chocolate, place the frozen cookies on a cooling rack set on top of a baking sheet and spoon the melted chocolate over them, then place the baking sheet with the cookie-topped cooling rack into the refrigerator to harden the melted chocolate coating.

      Chocolate Lovers Trivia Quiz


      view quiz statistics

      Chocolate Oblivion Truffle Torte Recipe | From Rose Levy Beranbaum's The Cake Bible Cookbook

      My favorite recipe from The Cake Bible, a superb cookbook by legendary baker, columnist and cookbook author Rose Levy Beranbaum, is her amazing Chocolate Oblivion Truffle Torte, a sublime flourless chocolate cake that's as moist and rich as fudge and tastes 100 times better.

      A slice of chocolate truffle torte
      A slice of chocolate truffle torte | Source

      Rose Levy Beranbaum's The Cake Bible is one of my two favorite cake cookbooks of all time (the other being Maida Heatter's Cakes). Every recipe I've made from The Cake Bible has turned out perfectly, thanks not only to Berenbaum's superb recipes but also to her clear, detailed, easy-to-follow directions with valuable tips that ensure successful results.

      This fabulous, divinely decadent chocolate dessert recipe requires just three simple ingredients and couldn't be easier to make. Beranbaum recommends serving it with fresh homemade whipped cream, fresh raspberries and raspberry sauce (see my raspberry coulis recipe, above). They are the perfect foils for this sinfully rich chocolate indulgence.

      This sumptuous flourless chocolate cake is elegant enough for a sophisticated dinner party and sensuous enough for an intimate, romantic tête à tête with someone special.

      Enjoy Rose Levy Beranbaum's Chocolate Oblivion Truffle Torte Recipe from The Cake Bible courtesy of her website, Real Baking with Rose.

      A Better Springform Pan Alternative For Cakes Baked in a Water Bath

      Unless you use extra-wide, heavy-duty aluminum foil to wrap the outside of a springform pan before you place it in a water bath, it's difficult to prevent the water from seeping around the edges of the foil. That's why a two-piece cake pan bottom with tall sides and a leak-proof silicone gasket works better for tortes and cheesecakes that are baked in a water bath. The Kuhn Rikon PushPan comes in 8", 9" and 10" sizes and is guaranteed not to leak.

      Watch Rose Levy Beranbaum Prepare Her Outrageously Delicious Chocolate Oblivion Truffle Torte

      This video demonstration of Rose Levy Beranbaum's famous Chocolate Oblivion Truffle Torte recipe comes from her public television series Real Baking with Rose on PBS. Rose shares many valuable tips for getting perfect results, so be sure to watch both videos (parts 1 and 2) before you make the recipe.

      "Mom always said too much chocolate is like having too much love — you can't get enough."

      — Geraldine Solon

      Emeril Lagasse's New York Style Chocolate Cheesecake Recipe

      Chocolate. Cheescake. Emeril. Talk about a winning combination! Enough said (because it isn't polite to talk with a mouth full of decadent chocolate cheesecake!).

      Enjoy renowned chef Emeril Lagasse's sensational New York Style Chocolate Cheesecake Recipe on FoodNetwork.com.

      A luscious slice of chocolate cheesecake
      A luscious slice of chocolate cheesecake | Source

      Chocolate symbolizes, as does no other food, luxury, comfort, sensuality, gratification, and love.

      — Karl Petzke

      Maida Heatter's The Queen Mother's Cake Recipe

      Maida Heatter is known as "The Queen of Desserts" and has been dubbed "The Queen of Cake" by Saveur magazine. A culinary legend, Maida Heatter is the author of nine classic dessert cookbooks, one of the first people to have been inducted into the Chocolatier Hall of Fame, named to Cook's Magazine'sWho's Who in Cooking and a member of the James Beard Foundation Hall of Fame. With all those accolades, the dessert for which she is best known and her most popular cake is the divine chocolate-glazed chocolate-almond torte known as "The Queen Mother's Cake". It's her favorite as well. She wrote about it, "If there could be only one cake in the whole world, this would be my choice." So, of course, this iconic chocolate cake recipe was the perfect choice to cap off my list of the 10 Best Chocolate Dessert Recipes.

      Doesn't this chocolate cake look mouthwatering?
      Doesn't this chocolate cake look mouthwatering? | Source

      Like Rose Levy Beranbaum (whom she no doubt influenced), culinary legend Maida Heatter writes sublime dessert recipes that allow even inexperienced bakers to create successfully thanks to her detailed step-by-step instructions and helpful tips. I never worry about trying out a Maida Heatter cake recipe for the first time to serve to company, as I know it will turn out perfectly. My two favorite recipes from Maida Heatter's Book of Great Desserts are her 62nd St. Lemon Cake and Heatter's own personal favorite, The Queen Mother's Cake.

      I urge you to make Maida Heatter's The Queen Mother's Cake Recipe for your next special occasion. Decorate it with the long homemade chocolate curls Heatter calls Chocolate Cigarettes and serve it with freshly whipped cream and fresh berries on the side. It's divine ambrosia for any chocolate lover!

      Maida Heatter Was "Discovered" by Craig Claiborne

      Maida Heatter was a fashion illustrator, jewelry and accessories designer, restaurant co-owner (with her husband, Ralph) and baking teacher before being discovered by legendary New York Times food editor and cookbook author Craig Claiborne in 1968. Claiborne was so impressed by the desserts she served while catering the Republican Party presidential convention in Miami that Heatter offered him copies of some of her handwritten recipes, which impressed him so much that he suggested she write a cookbook. Knopf published Maida Heatter's Book of Great Desserts in 1974, which quickly became a New York Times best-selling cookbook and winner of the prestigious James Beard Award and has been reprinted many times. It continues to be hugely popular and influential in the baking world.

      Learn How to Temper Chocolate from Top Professional Chocolatiers Including Jacques Torres

      There is more than one method for tempering chocolate. The following videos demonstrate both the classic methods as well as a quicker and easier microwave method, so there's no need to feel intimidated by this essential confectioner's technique.

      © 2013 Margaret Schindel

      What's Your Favorite Chocolate Dessert? If You Don't Love Chocolate (Gasp!), What's Your Favorite Non-Chocolate Dessert?

        0 of 8192 characters used
        Post Comment

        • Margaret Schindel profile image
          Author

          Margaret Schindel 2 years ago from Massachusetts

          Thank you, Lady Lorelei! They're actually quite fudgy, but they definitely do taste heavenly. :)

        • Lady Lorelei profile image

          Lorelei Cohen 2 years ago from Canada

          Your Truffle Brownies look like they fell from heaven. Light flakey and cakey. Yum.

        • Margaret Schindel profile image
          Author

          Margaret Schindel 2 years ago from Massachusetts

          @MelRootsNWrites, I'm with you!

        • MelRootsNWrites profile image

          Melody Lassalle 2 years ago from California

          I've a devoted chocoholic. Brownies are my favorite. But, you could just give me a dark chocolate bar and I'd be happy.

        • Margaret Schindel profile image
          Author

          Margaret Schindel 2 years ago from Massachusetts

          @Victoria Lynn, you and me both (re: the chocolate truffles)! Thanks so much for pinning this to your chocolate board.

        • Margaret Schindel profile image
          Author

          Margaret Schindel 2 years ago from Massachusetts

          @Kathryn, thanks for popping back in for another look! I wish you lived close enough for me to bake you a pan of those chocolate truffle brownies, but knowing how good you are in the kitchen I'm sure you'll be able to whip up a batch yourself. :)

        • Victoria Lynn profile image

          Victoria Lynn 2 years ago from Arkansas, USA

          Yum! Chocolate! I think I was born with a chocolate truffle in my mouth, too. I could eat truffles all day. And anything else chocolate. Pinning this to my chocolate board!

        • ecogranny profile image

          Kathryn Grace 2 years ago from San Francisco

          Ran across this page again today and just had to take another look. It all looks so good, but what I most want right now is one of the chocolate truffle brownies. Mmmmmmmmmm. So good!

        • Margaret Schindel profile image
          Author

          Margaret Schindel 2 years ago from Massachusetts

          Mary Beth, how lucky for you! I can't resist a pain au chocolat either, especially if it's warm. Yum! And I know you'll love my chocolate truffle brownies recipe if you like your brownies chewy and gooey.

        • Margaret Schindel profile image
          Author

          Margaret Schindel 2 years ago from Massachusetts

          Me, too, Barbara! I've made it several times and it's an absolutely decadent chocolate dessert. I'm crazy for chocolate and raspberries together so I usually serve it with whipped cream and raspberry coulis, but it's pretty darn awesome with whipped cream and caramel sauce, too, the way Gordon Ramsay usually serves it.

        • mbgphoto profile image

          Mary Beth Granger 2 years ago from O'Fallon, Missouri, USA

          I just returned from a cruise where I selected one of those luscious chocolate croissants for breakfast every morning. They are wonderful!

          That Chocolate Truffle Brownie looks great I must try that recipe.

        • Brite-Ideas profile image

          Barbara Tremblay Cipak 2 years ago from Toronto, Canada

          Oh Margaret, what a page! that molten lava cake is speaking to me *bites wrist*

        • Margaret Schindel profile image
          Author

          Margaret Schindel 2 years ago from Massachusetts

          Thanks so much, Merry! You must be a serious chocolate lover like me. ;)

        • Merrci profile image

          Merry Citarella 2 years ago from Oregon's Southern Coast

          Oh boy, this is definitely getting pinned for future use. It is somewhat satisfying just looking at the photos. Must be amazing to taste!

        • Margaret Schindel profile image
          Author

          Margaret Schindel 3 years ago from Massachusetts

          @Andromachi: Thanks so much, Andromachi! I DO really adore chocolate, and after a lifetime of frequent unhealthy indulgences I'm trying to make healthier choices and save the less healthy but divine sweets as special treats for special occasions. I love coming up with delicious but also healthier chocolate (and non-chocolate) dessert alternatives, and my healthier chocolate rocks recipe is one of them. I hope your family enjoys them if you decide to make them! :)

        • Andromachi profile image

          Andromachi 3 years ago

          I really loved your lenses. You must really adore chocolate.

          I like it but I can live without it as well.

          I really liked your healthier chocolate rocks recipe.

          Probably my family if they check your lens will ask for more. I must prepare myself. lol

          They are chocolate lovers, I don't remember a day they haven't got a bite whenever there is chocolate at home.

        • Margaret Schindel profile image
          Author

          Margaret Schindel 3 years ago from Massachusetts

          @Charito1962: Thanks from a fellow chocoholic! :D

        • Charito1962 profile image

          Charito Maranan-Montecillo 3 years ago from Manila, Philippines

          The photos in this lens make my mouth water! I'm a chocoholic! You tempt me...ha, ha!

        • Margaret Schindel profile image
          Author

          Margaret Schindel 3 years ago from Massachusetts

          @favored: Fay, I'm originally from Manhattan and this is the "real deal" New York style cheesecake - dense, creamy, smooth and utterly sinful. I hope you get a chance to try it! :)

        • favored profile image

          Fay Favored 3 years ago from USA

          Oh my this isn't what I should be looking at when I'm hungry. The NY chocolate cheesecake is so good. I have had it in NY, but don't know if it's the same one. Have to bookmark this!

        Click to Rate This Article