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Traditional Irish Food

Updated on September 29, 2014

Traditional Irish food is comfort food at its best

If you are a lover of comfort food like I am, then you are going to love traditional Irish foods. These nostalgic foods fill the belly with warmth, embrace your heart with joy and just go down way too easy because they taste so darn good.

As I sit and write, during a chilly day in February, with a snowy forecast in the future. I am basking in the delightful aroma coming from my oven as I am baking a batch of Irish soda bread, the perfect accompaniment to the Irish stew simmering on my stove-top. I take in as much as I can, attempting to savor the bouquet of these traditional Irish foods. As a decedent of an Irish Grandmother, I am fortunate to enjoy so many wonderful comfort foods from the Emerald Isle. And being married to a chef, only makes my grandmothers recipes even better.

Here you will find recipes and a bit of history of some delicious traditional Irish foods, which I think you will enjoy. So sit back and relax and take it all in.

Irish Potatoes
Irish Potatoes

Photo Credit: Irish Potato Poster Available at All Posters.com

Potato Tales

Potatoes were an extremely important crop to the Irish and is a favorite food to them today.

A quick history of the potato:

  • First crop which was domesticated by man and was found in North and South Americas.
  • Earliest record of a potato dates back to 4th century AD, and came from a picture of a potato on an Inca ceramic piece.
  • The Spanish brought the potato to Europe in 1570 and it reached the British Isles in 1590.
  • Ireland used it as a staple food and it was widely accepted in 1663, a few years later it became known as the Irish potato.
  • Dependence on this one crop and colder then usual climate causing potato blight is what led to the potato famines in the 1700's.

Of all foods, the spud is the most traditional. They are consumed boiled, mashed fried or even chipped. Mixed with cabbage or scallions to make Colcannon or Champ or even made into pancakes, also known as Boxty. Potatoes are added to stews, soups and on top of pies. The Irish are quite fussy about their potatoes and have reason to be. Since they are the potato experts.

Traditional Irish Recipes

  • Irish Soda Bread
  • Nettle Soup
  • Boxty
  • Bacon and Cabbage
  • Irish Stew
  • Coddle
  • Colcannon
  • Champ
  • Leek and Potato Soup
  • Tea Brack

Old Irish Wives Tale #1

If a magpie comes chattering at your window sill it is a sign of death.

A little history about Irish Soda Bread

There are so many traditional variations of Irish soda bread it can get a bit confusing as to which ones are actually Irish. However many people think of irish soda bread as white, which would have been more of a luxury to the Irish. Traditionally, brown soda bread is what was served, made with whole meal flour. Soda bread is a basic table bread, served with any meal like a nice Irish Stew.

The introduction of bread soda (baking soda) in the early 1800's enabled people to make bread without the use of an oven. Since an oven in these days was basically non-existent, bread soda was a break through. Now, everyone could make bread. All they needed was some wonderful bread soda, buttermilk from their cows, and flour from the grains which they grew in their fields. The bread was cooked in a bastible, which is a big cast-iron pot with a lid placed right onto the open coals.

There are so many variations to this bread but the true Irish soda bread would have been brown and plain. Adding dried fruit to this bread would not have happened since these fruits would have been a luxury item. It has been reported that some regions of Ireland used seeds in their breads and this custom may have been taken with them to America.

No matter how Irish Soda Bread is made, it's very tasty and super easy.

Photo Credit: Irish Soda Bread The really good life

Ingredients

  • 2 cups brown whole-wheat flour (stone ground preferred)
  • 1 3/4 to 2 cups buttermilk
  • 2 cups white flour
  • 2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 3 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 egg
  • beaten

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 375°
  2. Mix the dry ingredients in a bowl. Make a well in the center and add 1 3/4 cups of buttermilk and the beaten egg. Stir from the outside of the bowl, mixing inward to blend together. The dough should be soft, but not sticky. Add more buttermilk if necessary or a little more flour if it seems too moist.
  3. When all is blended, put onto a floured board or countertop. Knead very lightly until all is smoothed over. This only takes a few seconds.
  4. Pat into a round loaf about 2" high. Cut a cross pattern all the way along the top.
  5. Place on a lightly greased baking sheet and bake in the preheated oven for 35 to 40 minutes.
  6. Test for doneness by tapping on the bottom of the loaf. If it sounds hollow it's done.
  7. Cool on a wire rack. Enjoy!
2 stars from 11 ratings of Brown Soda Bread

WARNING... Do not over knead the dough, this will cause the dough to be tough.

Irish soda Bread
Irish soda Bread

White Soda Bread

  • 4 cups white flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 1/2 to 1 3/4 cups buttermilk

Instructions

  1. Makes one loaf.
  2. Preheat oven to 450 degrees
  3. Mix the dry ingredients in a bowl.
  4. Make a well in the center and add 1 1/2 cups of buttermilk. Stir from the outside of the bowl, mixing inward to blend together. The dough should be soft, but not sticky. Add more buttermilk if necessary.
  5. When all is blended, put onto a floured board or countertop. Knead very lightly until all is smoothed over. This only takes a few seconds. Pat into a round loaf about 2" high. Cut a cross pattern all the way along the top.
  6. Place on a lightly greased baking sheet and bake in the preheated oven for 15 minutes. Then turn it down to 400 degrees and bake for 20 to 30 minutes longer.
  7. Test for doneness by tapping on the bottom of the loaf. If it sounds hollow it's done.
  8. Cool on a wire rack. If you don't like your bread so crusty, wrap it in a towel while cooling.
  9. Photo Credit: Irish Soda Bread- St. Patricks Day Fabulous Food

Old Irish wives tale #2

Eating five meals of nettle before the 1st of May cleans the blood.

Nettle Plant by Wildman
Nettle Plant by Wildman

Nettle Soup

What is a nettle?

It is a weed which grows abundantly all over the world. Also known as stinging nettle, the stems and leaves are covered in tiny, needle-like hairs that will give you a nasty rash if you touch them with bare skin. This weed is edible and has quite a few health benefits. I have included a book about edible weeds, if you would like to know more about this wonder weed and others.

At one time in Ireland, using nettles in food was quite common, especially during those times when food was scarce. An interesting point about this nasty weed "nettle" is that it is full of essential vitamins and minerals. Packed with minerals like calcium, magnesium and iron, as well as vitamins A and C. To top things off, nettle is totally free and most likely available right in your own back yard.

Nettle soup is not commonly eaten today, however there is no denying how healthy this evil weed is. Don't be surprised when you see it on a healthy restaurants menu.

Photo: Amazon Product Image Edible Wild Plants: Wild Foods From Dirt To Plate

Stinging nettle soup
Stinging nettle soup

Stinging Nettle Soup

Unless you enjoy pain, you will need to wear a good pair of gloves when collecting your nettle. Look for younger plants, they will taste better and are more tender. A younger plant can be identified by having brighter green leaves. Just fill up one of those plastic grocery store bags with the bright green nettle tops.

F.Y.I The sting of the nettle will disappear during the first few minutes of boiling.

  • Cook time: 1 hour
  • Ready in: 1 hour
  • Yields: 8

Ingredients

  • 1 Tbsp butter
  • 1 onion
  • diced
  • 1 lb Yukon Gold potatoes
  • peeled and chopped
  • 1/2 lb fresh nettle leaves (NOTE: use gloves to handle while raw)
  • 6 to 8 quarts vegetable or light chicken stock
  • Juice of 1 or 2 lemons
  • Salt and Pepper to taste
  • Creme fraiche or plain yogurt (optional)

Instructions

  1. Melt 1 Tbsp butter in a large stockpot. Sweat onion in butter until translucent, about 5 minutes.
  2. Add potatoes and 6 quarts stock, stir to incorporate. Bring to a boil, then let simmer until potatoes are tender, about 20 minutes.
  3. Stir in nettle leaves and cook 3-4 minutes more.
  4. Add salt & lemon juice to taste.
  5. Puree very well in a blender or with an immersion blender, adding more stock if needed to adjust thickness. If texture is still too fibrous, push through a fine sieve.
  6. Serve hot. Optionally, garnish with a dollop of creme fraiche or plain yogurt.
  7. 1 cup whipping cream, 2 tablespoons buttermilk, Combine 1 cup whipping cream and 2 tablespoons buttermilk in a glass container. Cover and let stand at room temperature (about 70°F) from 8 to 24 hours, or until very thick.
  8. Recipe adapted from Blue Ridge Restaurant's "Stinging Nettle Soup"

Edible Wild Plants

Edible Wild Plants: Wild Foods From Dirt To Plate

Edible Wild Plants provides what you really need to know to have your own wild food adventures. Author John Kallas gives you unprecedented details, maps, simple explanations, and multiple close-up photographs of every plant covered at every important stage of growth. This beautiful, glossy book has the sharpest edible wild plant photos available. If you didn't recognize these plants before, you will now. The author focuses on the best parts of the plants to use, and even recipes.

Click here for more information about Edible Wild Plants

I recommend this book to anyone who really wants to feel better about their health,Have a relationship with the earth,and a backyard buffet!

Survival at your doorstep makes for a confident forager!

Old Irish Wives Tale #3

If you spill salt, you must throw some over your left shoulder to stave off bad luck.

All Clad Non-Stick Fry Pan

All-Clad 7112NSR2 MC2 Professional Master Chef 2 Stainless Steel Bi-Ply Bonded Oven Safe PFOA Free Nonstick Fry Pan Cookware, 12-Inch, Silver
All-Clad 7112NSR2 MC2 Professional Master Chef 2 Stainless Steel Bi-Ply Bonded Oven Safe PFOA Free Nonstick Fry Pan Cookware, 12-Inch, Silver

This classic slope-sided fry pan illustrates the Master Chef line's stylish yet practical design. It's 12 inches in diameter and 2 inches deep, large enough for a professional kitchen but fully functional in a home kitchen--and it cooks with little or no fat for healthful meals. A non-stick interior speeds up cleaning and allows you to cook with minimal to no fat. Stainless-steel interior; brushed aluminum exterior; aluminum core

Layer of scratch-resistant, professional-grade nonstick bonded to interior

Long, comfortable stay-cool handle riveted for strength

Lifetime warranty against defects

 

Boxty is an Irish Potato Pancake

A traditional Irish potato pancake. The most popular type of boxty consists of finely grated, raw potato and mashed potato with flour, baking soda, buttermilk and sometimes egg. The mixture is fried on a griddle for a few minutes on each side, similar to a normal pancake. They can also be found in restaurants with various toppings and stuffings. The most noticeable difference between boxty and other fried potato dishes is its smooth, fine grained consistency.

The Irish were the first to call potatoes "spuds". The name is from a type of shovel used to dig up potato hills.

Boxty Recipe

  • 1 1/2 cups freshly cook potatoes
  • 1 1/2 cups peeled raw potatoes
  • 1 1/2 cups white flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon sifted baking powder
  • 1 1/2 cups buttermilk
  • pinch of salt
  • Butter for frying
Boxty
Boxty

Instructions

  1. Peel the cooked potatoes while they are still hot, drop into a bowl and mash immediately. Grate the raw potatoes, add to the mashed potatoes with the flour and sifted baking powder.
  2. Mix well, and add enough buttermilk to make a stiff batter.
  3. Heat a frying pan, grease with butter and cook large or small pancakes in the usual way. Eat them straight from the pan with butter, crispy rashers or pure Irish honey.
  4. Enjoy!
  5. Photo Credit: Boxty- Will jog for food

Old Irish Wives Tale #4

LAUGH before breakfast and it will end in tears before supper; to laugh excessively shows that the person is possessed and that his days are numbered.

As you may know already, corned beef and cabbage was not a traditional Irish food. It is however a traditional American-Irish Food. The Irish version is known as bacon and cabbage. The bacon is not the typical cut we find in America, also known as back bacon. This is a lot leaner than American bacon and is more similar to Canadian bacon.

Until about the middle of the 20th century, people living in Ireland would never have been able to obtain corned beef. Beef was primarily eaten by the wealthy.

Today, corned beef is widely available in Ireland, but bacon and cabbage are still much more popular. It's a regular meal in an Irish home, and can be found on many restaurants or pubs menus. You may see corned beef and cabbage on irish pub's lunch menu, but this is mainly for the tourists who expect to see it there.

Bacon and Cabbage

  • 3 to 4 lbs Irish Bacon
  • 2 Onions
  • 2 Carrots
  • 1 Celery stick
  • 1 Cabbage
  • 1 pat of Butter
  • 1 Tbl Honey
  • 1 Tbl Whole Grain Mustard
  • Pinch of Ground Cloves

Instructions

  1. Place meat in a large saucepan of water and bring to a boil. If a white foam forms on the top, drain off the water and replace with cold water and bring to a boil again. The foam is salt and you need to repeat until no foam forms on the top.
  2. Add the vegetables and simmer for 1 hour and 15 minutes.
  3. Once the meat is cooked remove it from the water and dry it. If there is a coating of thick fat, it can be cut off. Retain 1 cup of cooking water and discard the vegetables.
  4. Mix the honey and mustard and cloves together and rub over the bacon. Cover and refrigerate over night.
  5. Before serving, put the bacon in the oven at about 400 degrees for about 20 to 30 minutes.
  6. Remove outer leaves of the cabbage and discard. Cut into fours and remove the stalk. Then finely shred it.
  7. Put half of the cupful of bacon water you saved into the saucepan, add the butter and bring to a boil.
  8. Add the cabbage to the boiling water and stir constantly until it wilts and becomes soft. It only takes about 5 minutes to cook. The water and butter will disappear so there is no need to drain.
  9. Serve with Champ or Mashed Potatoes.
  10. Enjoy!

Old Irish Wives Tale #5

If a chair falls when a person stands up, it is an unlucky omen.

An Irish Stew

I love stews! There are so many recipes for Irish stew and they are all slightly different. The great thing about stews; there is no wrong way to make it. Cook it in the oven or on the stove, use lamb or beef, parsnips or carrots, onions or leeks, its all up to you and your taste and what you have on hand.

I believe a true Irish Stew should contain potatoes or it really isn't irish. However, many Irish Stews do not contain potatoes. The traditional meat for an Irish stew is lamb. However, if you prefer you can substitute beef.

Irish Stew

  • 2 pounds boneless lamb (shoulder or leg)
  • 2 pounds potatoes
  • 2 large onions
  • 1 tablespoon fresh chopped thyme or 1 teaspoon dried
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1 -1/2 cups water
  • Fresh chopped parsley for garnish

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 275° F.
  2. Trim the meat into about 1" cubes leaving on a little of the fat.
  3. Peel and slice the potatoes 1/4" thick. Do the same with the onions.
  4. Now take a large oven proof pot or casserole with a cover, about 6 quart size. Place a layer of potatoes in the bottom of the pan, leave enough for a final top layer of potatoes.
  5. Lightly season this layer and the following layers with salt, pepper and thyme.
  6. Then add the layer of the lamb and season. Add the layer of onions and season. Finish off with a top layer of potatoes and season. Add the water and cover. Put in the oven for about 2-1/2 hours.
  7. The pan should be shaken once in a while to keep the potatoes on the bottom from sticking. You should also check to be sure the liquid hasn't dried out.
  8. When done the liquid should be slightly thickened by the potatoes. If you'd like you could brown it in the broiler before serving and sprinkle some fresh parsley on top before serving.
  9. How about a nice Guinness Stew, it just doesn't get any more Irish than that. Your can read about it here. Enjoy!

Old Irish Wives Tale #6

You must never build a house on the site of a Fairy Fort for it will bring you eternal bad luck.

Coddle

Coddle is a dish associated with Dublin and is commonly referred to as Dublin Cobble. It consists of layers of sliced pork sausages and rashers (bacon) with sliced potatoes, and onions. A very simple dish and the with the only seasoning usually being salt and pepper and little parsley. Coddle is considered a comfort food in Ireland, quite inexpensive and easy to prepare. It is often eaten in the winter months and is an alternative to an Irish stew. It has been said to cure hangovers and other ailments.

Irish Coddle
Irish Coddle

Irish Coddle Recipe

  • 1 pound bacon slices
  • 2 pounds pork sausages
  • 2 whole garlic cloves
  • 4 large potatoes
  • peeled and sliced thick
  • 2 onions
  • sliced
  • 2 carrots
  • peeled and chunked
  • 1 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 4 cups apple cider
  • 2 teaspoons parsley flakes

Instructions

  1. Put the bacon in a skillet over medium heat. Fry for 10 minutes or until very crisp. Remove the bacon to a piece of paper towel to drain.
  2. Remove all but 1 tablespoon of the bacon drippings from the pan and discard. Place the sausage links into the skillet with the reserved drippings. Brown the sausage 8 minutes, turning often to brown all sides. Remove the sausage and drain on a paper towel.
  3. Place the onion and garlic cloves into the drippings in the skillet. Turn heat to medium low and cook for 5 minutes, or until just beginning to soften.
  4. Crumble the bacon into the bottom of a large soup kettle. Place the cooked sausage into the pot with the bacon. Add the softened onions and garlic cloves. Place the potatoes and carrots into the kettle. Sprinkle salt and pepper over all ingredients. Pour enough of the apple cider over the mixture in the pot to just cover.
  5. Cover and cook over medium low heat for 1 1/2 hours. Sprinkle the parsley over the soup just before serving. Makes about 6 servings.Put the bacon in a skillet over medium heat. Fry for 10 minutes or until very crisp. Remove the bacon to a piece of paper towel to drain.
  6. Remove all but 1 tablespoon of the bacon drippings from the pan and discard. Place the sausage links into the skillet with the reserved drippings. Brown the sausage 8 minutes, turning often to brown all sides. Remove the sausage and drain on a paper towel.
  7. Place the onion and garlic cloves into the drippings in the skillet. Turn heat to medium low and cook for 5 minutes, or until just beginning to soften.
  8. Crumble the bacon into the bottom of a large soup kettle. Place the cooked sausage into the pot with the bacon. Add the softened onions and garlic cloves. Place the potatoes and carrots into the kettle. Sprinkle salt and pepper over all ingredients. Pour enough of the apple cider over the mixture in the pot to just cover.
  9. Cover and cook over medium low heat for 1 1/2 hours. Sprinkle the parsley over the soup just before serving. Makes about 6 servings.Photo Credit: Irish Coddle Menu Pages

Old Irish Wives Tale #7

The shoe or a horse or donkey nailed above your door will bring good luck. But the shoe must be found, not bought.

Colcannon

If there is one truly Irish dish, this is it. Colcannon is a true comfort food made primarily from mashed potatoes and cabbage, sometimes kale, and butter, salt, and pepper. It can contain other ingredients such as milk, leeks, onions, garlic, boiled ham or rashers. A very ordinary meal, and at one time it was a cheap, year-round staple food. An old Irish Halloween tradition was to hide small coins inside colcannon prior to serving.

Colcannon is tasty and filling and super easy to make. An Irish favorite and even has a song about it.

Colcannon
Colcannon

Traditional Colcannon Recipe

  • 4 lbs potatoes or about 7 to 8 large potatoes. (Russet or old Potatoes are best)
  • 1 Green Cabbage or Kale
  • 1 Cup Milk or Cream
  • 1 Stick Butter divided into 3 parts
  • 4 to 5 Scallions
  • chopped
  • Salt and Pepper to taste
  • Fresh Parsley or Chives

Instructions

  1. Peel and boil the potatoes.
  2. Remove the core from the cabbage and thinly slice, put into a large saucepan of boiling water. Keep it boiling at a slow boil for 3 to 5 minutes or until the cabbage is wilted and has turned darker. Don't let it over cooked, if anything it should be slightly undercooked.
  3. Drain the cabbage and return to saucepan. Add 1/3 of the butter and cover. Leave it covered and not on a burner for butter to melt.
  4. When the potatoes are soft, drain and return to saucepan and place on a low burner, leaving lid off for excess moisture to evaporate.
  5. Add milk to saucepan with potatoes, with 1/3 of butter and chopped scallions. Allow milk to warm but not boil, it is almost done if butter has melted and begins to meld in.
  6. Using a potato masher or a fork mash the potatoes thoroughly into the buttermilk mixture. Do not pass through a ricer or a mixer, because it will make the potatoes sticky and gluey.
  7. Mix the cabbage throughly with the mashed potatoes.
  8. Prior to serving season with a little salt and fresh parsley or chives. Don't forget to make a well in the center and put the last third of butter in the center and allow to melt. Enjoy!
  9. Photo Credit & Recipe adapted: Leek and Potato Soup DoChara

All Clad Stainless Steel Fry Pan

This All Clad 8/10 stainless steel aluminum core 12-Inch Fry pan is the perfect kitchen essential for a new homemaker as well as the well-seasoned cook and everyone in between.

All Clad Stainless Steel 12-Inch Fry Pan

  • 3-Ply bonded construction
  • Dishwasher-safe; Hand-washing recommended
  • Exterior compatible on all induction as well as traditional cooktops
  • Essential cookware item for the novice or well-seasoned cook
  • Perfect bridal or housewarming gift

Whole Grain Irish Mustard with Guinness Stout

Lakeshore Wholegrain Mustard with Irish Stout, 7.23 Ounce
Lakeshore Wholegrain Mustard with Irish Stout, 7.23 Ounce

Lakeshore Wholegrain Mustards are prepared by hand in the traditional dijon manner, using the finest natural ingredients without artificial colorings, flavorings or preservatives. They are produced in the village of Ballinderry in small batches to retain the distinctive flavors that enhance all savory dishes, from sandwiches to steak. Whole Grain Mustard with Guinness is a unique blend of Guinness Stout and mustard that is excellent with roast beef, steaks, and barbecued meats. Adds subtle flavor to sauces, and zest to soups and casseroles.

 

Old Irish Wives Tale #8

If you get your shirt wet while you're washing the dishes you will marry a drunk.

Champ

Agreat food for a chilly day. Champ is one of those foods which warms your heart and soul. Butter is what makes this dish delicious. It is very similar to Colcannon, I guess you could say they are cousins. A great accompaniment to any meat. This is such an easy recipe it barely counts as a recipe at all.

Champ
Champ

Traditional Champ Recipe

  • 4 to 6 Potatoes (about 2 lbs) Russetts work well
  • avoid waxy skinned potatoes
  • 1/2 cup Milk
  • 1 stick Butter (divided into 2 equal parts)
  • 5 to 6 Scallions chopped
  • Salt and Pepper

Instructions

  1. Peel and boil potatoes until soft.
  2. when the potatoes are done, drain and return to sauce pan.
  3. Place the sauce pan with the drained potatoes on a low burner to remove all moisture.
  4. Add milk to the sauce pan along with half of the butter. Continue cooking on low heat, milk should warm but should not boil and butter should be fully melted.
  5. Using a potato masher or a fork, mash the potatoes thoroughly with the butter and milk mixture. Do not use a ricer or a mixer because this will make the potatoes sticky and gluey.
  6. Add the scallions and mix thoroughly through the mashed potato. Season with salt and pepper
  7. Prior to serving, make a well in the center of the potato add a nice sized pad of butter.
  8. Eat by dipping spoonfuls of potato into the melting butter. Yum!Enjoy!
  9. Photo Credit: The Daily Spud

Old Irish Wives Tale #9

If you possess a four-leaf shamrock you will have good luck in gambling, good luck in racing, and witchcraft will have no power over you. But, you must always carry it on you. You cannot give it away. You cannot show it to anyone.

Leek and Potato Soup

Leeks have there place in Ireland and lucky for them since potatoes and leeks just go so well together. The Normans brought Leeks to Ireland in the 15th century.

Ingredients

  • 4 Medium Potatoes chopped into 1" peices
  • 2 Medium onions
  • chopped
  • 4 Leeks
  • 1 celery stalk
  • sliced small
  • 1 large garlic clove
  • 1 large garlic clove
  • finely chopped
  • 4 cups of stock
  • 2 Tbl Butter
  • Salt and Pepper to taste
  • Fresh Parsley

Scott's Cakes Irish Potatoes

Scott's Cakes Irish Potatos 1 Pound Gourmet Box
Scott's Cakes Irish Potatos 1 Pound Gourmet Box

Scott's Irish Potatos are made with Real Butter and we make them 2 ways, with and without coconut. They are hand scooped and hand rolled in cinnamon.

 

Instructions

  1. Cut the hard green part of leeks off and discard. Split the leeks lengthwise and wash to remove any dirt in cold water. Drain and pat dry. Cut a 2's piece off from one leek and set aside. Cut the remaining leeks into 1" pieces.
  2. Melt the butter in a saucepan over low-medium temperature and add the onions, leeks, celery, garlic and potato, stir to coat and continue cooking about 5 to 6 minutes.
  3. Pour the stock into the saucepan and bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for about 20-25 minutes.
  4. Pour into a blender and blend until smooth. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
  5. Slice the 2" leek very thinly with some chopped parsley and add them both to the soup.
  6. Simmer for 5 to 10 minutes.Enjoy!
  7. Photo Credit & Recipe adapted: Leek and Potato Soup DoChara

Old Irish Wives Tale #10

If you stumble at a grave it is considered very bad luck.

Barm Brack or Tea Brack

Barm Brack or Tea Brack is a a sort of cross between cake and bread traditionally eaten at Halloween. Yeast is used as a raising agent in barm brack, while tea brack rises with the aid of baking powder. While bracks bought in stores will use yeast as a rising agent, this version is closer to the original, using baking powder instead. It is very moist and delicious cake.

The word Brack comes from an old Irish word, 'breac', meaning speckled, which every piece of this cake is.

Traditionally small trinkets are mixed into the brack before it is baked. Each one conveys a message or meaning for the beholder of the slice. The Here is a list of the trinkets and their meanings if you would be lucky enough to receive one.

Ring - marriage within the year

Coin or bean - wealth

Cloth or pea - poverty

Thimble - continue to be a spinster

Button - continue to be a bachelor

Religious medal - join a religious order

If you are using any of these items, wrap them well in wax paper before adding them to the mix.

Tea Brack
Tea Brack

Tea Brack

  • 1 1/2 strong brewed tea
  • 2 cups flour (all purpose)
  • 3 cups mixed raisins (golden and regular)
  • 1/2 brown sugar
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp all spice
  • 1 tsp grated orange rind (optional)
  • 1 egg
  • 1/4 cup Orange marmalade

Instructions

  1. You will need a loaf pan or a deep round cake pan, spring pans work nicely. Round style is more traditional.
  2. Put the tea, sugar, lemon rind and dried fruit in a bowl. Stir well, then cover and leave to soak overnight.
  3. The next day, preheat the oven to 350ºF, grease the pan with a little butter.
  4. Beat the egg and mix it thoroughly with the fruit and marmalade.
  5. Sift the flour, spices and bread soda together and stir well into the fruit mixture.
  6. Pour the batter into the baking pan.
  7. If adding charms...Push them into the batter, paying attention to evenly spacing them throughout the loaf.
  8. Bake for 90 minutes. Cool for 20 minutes in pan before placing on wire rack. Let cake cool completely.Enjoy!
  9. Photo Credit: Tea Brack Irish American Mom

Belleek Shamrock Teapot

Belleek Shamrock Teapot
Belleek Shamrock Teapot

Lifelike shamrocks on wandering vines adorn Belleek's Shamrock tea pot. Basket weave-textured embossment produces a brilliant luster and a natural look and feel. A great way to bring the Irish countryside to the dining or living room, this elegant piece is crafted of fine Parian China-a material developed in Great Britain in the 1840s for sculpting classical figurines with crystalline translucence. A sturdy handle allows easy control of the pot for smooth pouring. The handle is hand-painted in varying shades of green, from lighter to darker, and is complemented by brown brush strokes to create an earthy appearance.

 

Belleek Tara Accent Dish

Belleek Tara Accent Dish
Belleek Tara Accent Dish

Bring a piece of the Emerald Isle into your home with Belleek Tara Accent Bowl. The 6-inch Tara accent bowl by Belleek Pottery is made from white Parian china with hand painted shamrocks and Celtic designs. Imported from Ireland.

 

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So what do you think of Irish food? I hope you decide to try some of these traditional Irish recipes. They are comfort food at its best. Thanks again for visiting. Erin go braugh! (a.k.a Ireland Forever!)

Happy St. Patricks Day

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      glowchick 3 years ago

      So many yummy recipes! I will definitely try some of these :)

    • SetlikeJelly profile image

      David 4 years ago from Europe

      i miss a good stew...thanks for the recipe :-)

    • Lady Lorelei profile image

      Lorelei Cohen 4 years ago from Canada

      You really do rock girl. I didn't expect all the Irish excitement that I discovered here. You captivated me. When I think Irish I think potatoes and Irish stew. I had completely forgot about the traditional soda bread and I had never heard the terms coddle or champ before. You enlightened me.

    • J Crane profile image

      J Crane 4 years ago

      I have been reading lately a lot about irish traditional food, i will have to try one of those recipes...

    • J Crane profile image

      J Crane 4 years ago

      I have been reading lately a lot about irish traditional food, i will have to try one of those recipes...

    • profile image

      AngryBaker 5 years ago

      great recipes! I'll be trying some of them.

    • Kailua-KonaGirl profile image

      June Parker 5 years ago from New York

      Fabulous lens! It appears we have something else in common, our Irish Grandmamas! *Squid Angel Blessed* and added to My Squid Angel Blessings 2012 in the "Holidays & Celebrations » Saint Patrick's Day" neighborhood, rather than regional food. If you prefer I will change it to the food category. Just let me know.

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      faye durham 5 years ago

      Great lens and superb collection of Irish recipes. Much appreciated.

    • waldenthreenet profile image

      waldenthreenet 5 years ago

      Appreciating this topic, among the best IRISH topics I have visited as prep for St Patricks Day Celebrations. Conversations helps with new ideas. Congrads on your Squidoo Trophy. Thanks.

    • Brandi Bush profile image

      Brandi 5 years ago from Maryland

      Yum! May I feature this on my Traditional Irish Breakfast lens? :) Blessed by a SquidAngel!

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      julieannbrady 5 years ago

      Blimey ... but I am seriously all about that cabbage, you know? Erin go braugh.

    • Michey LM profile image

      Michey LM 5 years ago

      Thanks for recipes, great lens, and very Irish.

    • ClassyGals profile image

      Cynthia Davis 5 years ago from Pittsburgh

      I can't wait to try the Irish stew! These recipes sound soooo delicious. Lucky girl to have a chef for a husband. Angel Blessings**

    • flicker lm profile image

      flicker lm 5 years ago

      Thanks for the wonderful recipes! I copied several of them to try out.