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10 Reasons Why Call of Duty Most Likely Won’t Suck in 2018

Updated on February 13, 2018
Craig Easom profile image

Craig has been a writer on HubPages since 2013. He is currently studying for Marketing at Nottingham Trent University—in the land of Robin.

(cc image, Men of War: Vietnam poster) - We Are the Legions of Vietnam War Entertainment Adorers - How About You?
(cc image, Men of War: Vietnam poster) - We Are the Legions of Vietnam War Entertainment Adorers - How About You?

Call of Duty is Finally Fun Again, But There is Still a Fair Way to Go, And We Are Feeling Juiced for Call of Duty 2018 - Treyarch is Back!

2017 has been the best Call of Duty launch year of the past 5 years, having brought the FPS franchise back to its core roots with the latest COD title, WW2, taking fans back to the World War 2 setting (fairly self explanatory) with boots firmly on the ground.

Call of Duty: WW2 has broken records for digital sales on the PlayStation 4, even beating the sales for Treyarch’s 2015 COD launch titled Black Ops 3, giving a clear-cut sign that the WW2 title was the right decision for the development house, Sledgehammer Games, having abondoned earlier project work for an Advanced Warfare 2, and also a separate side-project for a Vietnam era Call of Duty title.

The key issue with the next-generation Call of Duty titles running from their 2014 launch year with Advanced Warfare, up until 2016‘s launch year with Infinite Warfare was the complete lack of faith in the Call of Duty community that had been there since the beginning, as the futuristic warfare settings simply turned the Call of Duty franchise into some kind of a hybrid franchise, balancing space with gravity-impaling bullets.

This was a clear-cut-and-paste game design from the competing FPS franchise, Titanfall, as Activision knew they needed to keep the Call of Duty franchise fresh and interesting in an ever-evolving games marketplace, and truly, the decision did make a lot of sense. Only, clearly someone overestimated the success for Titanfall, as the game might have been a hit with gamers, but it was not at a level of success that came anywhere close to the Call of Duty franchise.

Anyway, we’re back to boots on the ground modern/historical combat, and this makes perfect sense given that the futuristic warfare routes simply were not taking to the mass consumerism for FPS shooter titles. That said, 2018’s Call of Duty launch is almost definitely taking the player way back in time away from the futuristic direction of Black Ops 3, the last COD title that was developed by Treyarch Studios, simply to keep to a trend. We’re thinking modern era combat, in a relatively well known historical warfare setting.

(cc image, Xenopedia - Fandom) - Fingers Crossed for a Vietnam Themed Call of Duty Game by Treyarch in 2018 - How Are We Feeling About the Vietnam War As A Key Focus Point, in 2018's CoD?
(cc image, Xenopedia - Fandom) - Fingers Crossed for a Vietnam Themed Call of Duty Game by Treyarch in 2018 - How Are We Feeling About the Vietnam War As A Key Focus Point, in 2018's CoD?

No.1 - The “Black Ops 4” Rumour

A media-source fellow by the name of Marcus Sellars, an inside source for Nintendo leaks from the past, announced on his Twitter page that the 2018 rumoured Treyarch Call of Duty title, Black Ops 4, is currently being designed for a side port on the Nintendo Switch. Perhaps this is all just mere speculation, as it has been presumed, but the media-insider, Marcus Stellars, has revealed early news in the past regarding Nintendo, and his specultory information seems to always land right on the mark.

The Nintendo Switch has become vastly popular, currently dominating the handheld console gaming side to the industry, and Call of Duty have been supported in the past by the Nintendo brand, so it is very likely that there will be another alternative place where gamers can get their grasps into the latest Call of Duty trends.

Black Ops 4 does seem likely, given that the Black Ops series has been one of the biggest supported IP series for the Call of Duty franchise. Black Ops was Treyarch’s second big multiplayer title for the Call of Duty franchise, following directly on from World at War (Treyarch’s only other big well-known Call of Duty title, solo, series), and released in 2010. Black Ops covered the cold-war mainly, but did have elements in its story that edged into the wartime events of the Vietnam war.

Black Ops 2 skipped ahead in time, going as far ahead in the future as the year 2025, but also covering a story that stretched back more into the real-time events of the cold-war. The trilogy title, Black Ops 3, skipped way ahead into the future of the year 2065, where there is yet another cold war, but this title was the least well-received by its consumers due to the heavily optimised advanced movement systems and unrealistic gameplay mechanics.

Black Ops 4, despite popular belief, if this title were to happen then it is almost certain to take a step back from the futuristic bearings, and back into a familiar warfare setting. What we know for sure is that the players much preferred the Vietnam-styled setting of the first Black Ops title, and with Sledgehammer Games traipsing the CoD franchise back into traditionally historic warfare settings it wouldn’t make sense to drag the franchises community back and forth from the true warfare settings to the entirely fictional warfare settings. That said, Black Ops 4 might want to make complete use of the Vietnam war, and dismiss the cold-war setting in its entirety.

(cc image, Conflict: Vietnam, PS2 game) - Inspiration for the Next Call of Duty Title, Set for Launch Later This Year in 2018 - The Vietnam War Story
(cc image, Conflict: Vietnam, PS2 game) - Inspiration for the Next Call of Duty Title, Set for Launch Later This Year in 2018 - The Vietnam War Story

No.2 - Possibilty for Another Historical Wartime Tale

2017’s COD title brought us WW2.

2018 has been hinted on numerous occasions by the Activision CEO to be an exciting year for Call of Duty, also sighting that this is to be the beginning for the most exciting three-year development cycle releases of all time (or, as far) for the Call of Duty franchise, either meaning this starts with 2017’s Sledgehammer Games produced WW2, or that the real excitement starts with 2018’s Treyarch produced, the title currently unknown launch.

Whatever, it really doesn’t matter, as Treyarch is the most beloved of all the Call of Duty development studios, making 2018 a very exciting year for the Call of Duty franchise.

1965. Vietnam. US military vs. the Vietcong. In Hollywood, the home of the three biggest major movie studios, warzones during times of war, declarated or otherwise, are extremely popular settings for action/drama/thriller type movies. Perhaps the most popular war setting for a war movie is World War 2, but right behind the most popular war of all time is the second most popular war, Vietnam. There are whole groups of entertainment audiences that simply adore Vietnam war movies, such as Apocalypse Now, Platoon, We Were Soldiers, etc. Second best entertainment source, the video-games, have almost always hosted great shooter titles wrapping around the theme of the Vietnam war, but not in recent years, so perhaps Treyarch have a strong FPS story rolled under their sleeves for a Vietnam war game in 2018.

(cc image, Battlefield 3 poster) - Where Battlefield Have Done it Right, Call of Duty Has Done it Wrong - Multiplayer Map Design
(cc image, Battlefield 3 poster) - Where Battlefield Have Done it Right, Call of Duty Has Done it Wrong - Multiplayer Map Design

No.3 - Advancements in Gameplay Variety

One of the great things that we all welcomed in 2017’s launch of Call of Duty: WW2 was the all-new Multiplayer game mode, War, which sits in the second spot down on the multiplayer playlist, making it the second most popular game mode in WW2 Online, right behind the top spot and most popular contender, Team Deathmatch.

War is an entirely unique multiplayer game mode in WW2 Online, nothing like anything that we have ever seen before in Call of Duty multiplaye, and to be frank, most days it is the only game mode that many of us feel like playing.

In War, Multiplayer feels different, utilising the use of much larger exclusive maps that are objective-based, requiring the attacking team to complete a sequence of 3 objectives, and once one has been completed, the next section of the map will open up so that the next objective comes into play. As the defending team in a War, its time to build barricades, mounted LMG’s, and stand the ground defending the objective capture/bomb/build site until reinforcements arrive, and if the team fails to defend an objective, then the team will be prompted to retreat back to the next defence point on the map, and the cycle goes on.

In the War game mode in WW2 Online, there is no kill-to-death ratio, but kills will still be counted (just not to overall player stats), as in this game mode we are solely focused on capturing (as the attacker) and defending (as the defenders) the objectives. XP rates in War are competitive, as with all multiplayer game modes in lWW2 Online, however, kills outside of the objective zone will earn a reward of 40XP (less than half that of kills in TDM), and 75XP per kill on an objective zone (three quarters earn rate to that of TDM), and all mounted turret kills award a standard 75XP per kill. The XP multipliers for killstreaks in War work out at a quarter the earn rate to that of other standard multiplayer game modes, which makes sense we suppose given War is the one mode where kills are not a necessecity.

The great thing about War in WW2 Online is the objective completion XP rewards, as for each objective captured on the attacking team (*as long as the player is on the objective zone area at 100% capture) the player will be awarded 500XP, plus the additional 250XP which everyone on the attacking team will be awarded also. On Operation Breakout, as the attacking team; earn 500XP for building half the bridge, and an additional 500XP for building the other half of the bridge. Plant the bomb, in return earn a quick and easy 500XP. On the final objective, hug the tank as it crosses the finish line, and in return earn 500XP for the hugging, and the objective completion 250XP (*the standard earning rate for everyone on the attackers team).

All of the War maps are similar to Operation Breakout when it comes down to XP earn rates, but what wasn’t mentioned was the defenders earn rates, and that is simply down to the obvious similarities. Build the defences; such as 150XP for building a barricade, 150XP for building a mounted turret gunner, and on each objective there is the potential to earn 450XP to 600XP from building alone. The kill rates are all the same, and the key is repetition, so if an attacker destroys a barricade, then be the first to rebuild it, whilst also being rewarded another 150XP for the matter of moments the job took to do. Also, something else important as the defenders, when the indicator calls for a retreat, get to the next stage safely and the reward is yet another easy peazy 250XP.

Plus, leverage double XP across all Multiplayer playlists, and suddenly reaching prestige couldn’t be simpler. Less stress and aggrevation, with the one true downside to the War game mode being the lack of coordination with certain teams of players when playing with complete randoms.

(cc image, Far Cry 5 Season Pass DLC Poster) - Middle Image, Our Sole Incentive for a Vietcong Zombies in a Fully Fledged, Fully Committed Call of Duty "Vietnam" Game
(cc image, Far Cry 5 Season Pass DLC Poster) - Middle Image, Our Sole Incentive for a Vietcong Zombies in a Fully Fledged, Fully Committed Call of Duty "Vietnam" Game

No.4 - Vietcong Zombies

Too soon, maybe.

Sticking with our earlier speculation for a Vietnam, Black Ops title from Treyarch studios for 2018’s Call of Duty launch, this game would not be complete without a “Vietcong Zombies” game mode.

The Vietnamese might find the whole idea to be cynical, inappropriate and uncultured as a side project for a blockbuster video-game franchise to even consider including, but there is no doubting that the Western Hemisphere of the globe would go nuts for the “Virtcong Zombies” game mode.

Treyarch are the birthright owners for the ‘zombies’ game mode in the Call of Duty franchise, having first started the mode back in 2008’s World at War with ‘Nazi Zombies’, and ever since there has been the greatest zombies game mode experience in each and everyone of Treyarch’s mainstream Call of Duty titles.

Sledgehammer Games WW2 Zombies game mode is mediocre at best, with the plus of having well designed maps (*if we include the DLC 1 Zombies chapter map). Treyarch still reigns king on the front for the Call of Duty Zombies game mode, and a Vietnam War setting would go perfectly with Vietnam jungle setting zombies maps.

(cc image, "Born to Kill" poster from Full Metal Jacket movie, 1987) - Ever Since the Vietnam War Call of Duty Fans Have Been Asking for a Fully Honoured Vietnam War Title - Black Ops Simply Wasn't Committed Enough
(cc image, "Born to Kill" poster from Full Metal Jacket movie, 1987) - Ever Since the Vietnam War Call of Duty Fans Have Been Asking for a Fully Honoured Vietnam War Title - Black Ops Simply Wasn't Committed Enough

No.5 - An All New Vietnam Centred Game

Forget Black Ops (an unpopular opinion, we know), how about an all new series for the Call of Duty franchise that centres around the average US military soldiers life as they first deploy into the Vietnam jungle.

Dark, suspenseful, terrifying, and that’s only the beginning, as the US military became desperate during the Vietnam War dropping aimless bombs reigning down on civilian villages, towns, and even scattered bombs throughout the in-depth jungle wilderness.

The Vietcong were brutal warriors, often times running towards the US military with bayonet rifles and suicide bombs planted all the way around the enemy fighter. Often outnumbered, the US military would find themselves in close-quarters combat, perhaps even ill-trained and ill-equipped to deal with the oncoming threat.

Most of the US military infantry that were deployed into enemy territory in the heart of the Vietnamese war were perhaps no older than 19 years of age, and would find themselves outmatched fending off against 3 enemy Vietcong suicide fighters.

To put things into perspective, the US military had not trained their infantry for jungle warfare, and so, whilst fighting in the middle of a jungle the US marines would typically walk into enemy traps and explosives, not to mention the Vietcong also hid in wate under dig outs under ground covered with bushes and leaves. A battalion would walk past these Vietcong hideouts under ground, and as the team passes through there would be enemy targets armed with high-powered AK rifles firing at medium to short range distances.

That was kinda sorta fun to think about, so the real question left unanswered is, why have we not seen a Call of Duty game focus on these elements of the real Vietnam war from an average US military infantry soldiers eyes perspective. Black Ops focuses on the elite soldiers, whereas what we’re talking about is average Jo riding in on a US military helicopter into the heart of the Vietnam jungle with an M16 AR in one hand, and a gut load of fear in the other.

(cc image, Wiki - Fandom) - Call of Duty: World at War 2 Seems Unlikely, But it Wouldn't Be the Worst Game Imaginable
(cc image, Wiki - Fandom) - Call of Duty: World at War 2 Seems Unlikely, But it Wouldn't Be the Worst Game Imaginable

No.6 - Treyarch May (Just to Cover all Grounds) Be Returning to their WW2 Origins

Technically, when the Call of Duty community started their wishes and hopes forms for future COD titles, almost always it would be the World War 2 era, but clearly Activision weren’t listening with both ears since it was the Treyarch development house that the fans wanted focusing on the most expansive modern war there ever was.

Sledgehammer Games stepped forward in late 2017 with their latest Call of Duty development, WWII (the literal title for the game), set of course during the World War 2 era, covering a story that stretches across the European theatre.

Besides 2017’s Call of Duty: WWII, we haven’t seen a World War 2 era video-game of note in years, but why should that end here, as it might be a viable option for Treyarch to return to their roots, the roots being that of World at War, and a whole new story could be built around a World at War 2, a title that would garner a lot of invested interest.

World at War 2 could be a prequel to the first World at War, focusing on the events of World War I instead of the second World War. Battling down in the trenches, across no-mans land, now here’s a Call of Duty title that the masses would truly learn to appreciate.

(cc image, WWIILive) - Call of Duty's Online Meta Hasn't Seen Drivable Vehicles Since 2008's World at War, And Given Modern Advances in the Field of Gaming Technology, A "World at War" Remastered Would Be a God Send for the Eyes to Enjoy
(cc image, WWIILive) - Call of Duty's Online Meta Hasn't Seen Drivable Vehicles Since 2008's World at War, And Given Modern Advances in the Field of Gaming Technology, A "World at War" Remastered Would Be a God Send for the Eyes to Enjoy

No.7 - New Advancements in Vehicle Engagement Within the Developing Call of Duty Franchise

Concerning more to do with Call of Duty’s vast multiplayer experiences, the larger maps of recent online Call of Duty titles simply doesn’t cut it, as it prevents real player engagement with ground vehicles, aircraft and water assault.

As early as Call of Duty 3 the developers (Intinity Ward) tried and tested drivable vehicles in the games multiplayer, and although these experiences were gimicky at best it providing an adaptable player environment in the games multiplayer.

A couple of years after, Treyarch developed the Call of Duty: World at War title, and like Call of Duty 3 the title was set during the World War 2 era, even including very large maps in the games multiplayer where players could drive and cannon-fire tanks, amongst smaller ones where the battle is more confined.

Since 2008 when World at War released, there have been no Call of Duty titles that have broadened the span of gameplay in their multiplayer settings, opting instead for quicker gun fights in closely confined maps, with the average map being medium to small in size, and compared to World at Wars large maps the more recent Call of Duty titles have tiny large maps.

Without drivable, controlble vehicles (like in the Battlefield franchise), Call of Duty’s multiplayer is far too controlled as an environment for war battles to take place, and every experience on a particular map will feel like the same experience on that map, never altering, never evolving, and never opening a can of worms for possibilities that even the games developers didn’t see coming.

(cc image, PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds) - Since the Shooter Gaming Market Began Shifting Towards Battle Royale Titles, Call of Duty Has Begun to Shrink in Online Player-Count Numbers. How Will they Respond to this Threat in the Market?
(cc image, PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds) - Since the Shooter Gaming Market Began Shifting Towards Battle Royale Titles, Call of Duty Has Begun to Shrink in Online Player-Count Numbers. How Will they Respond to this Threat in the Market?

No.8 - Battle Royale

Call of Duty multiplayer over the past few to five years has become somewhat stale, perhaps due to its predictable formula for map design, map construction, and the rules written back when the most infamous Call of Duty multiplayer title released, Modern Warfare 2, all the way back in 2009.

In 2017, Call of Duty: WWII launched to a surprising multiplayer announcement, and obviously we were glad to see the franchise return to its roots in going back to the World War 2 setting (boots on the ground shooter action), but we’re thinking more about the all-new multiplayer game mode, War, which uses large exclusive to the game mode maps, each with their own unique operations covering key battles of World War 2 events, requiring the completion of 3 progressional objectives.

Crazy as it might sound, the WW2 multiplayer game mode playlist addition of War is the best thing to happen to Call of Duty since 2008’s Nazi Zombies game mode was released as a side mode in World at War, given that it feels so refreshing to play, and immediately there is the feeling of knowing this is an exclusive experience only found in that one title that is being played.

On to Battle Royale, and with the sudden hit popularity of the two major shooter video-game success titles, PublicUnknown’s Battlegrounds and Fortnite: Battle Royale, it would seem the shooter gaming community as a whole have taken a special liking to the battle royale style of gaming. In battle royale, there is a set number of players overall, perhaps 50, and the rules can change but a popular rule set is every man/woman/child for him/herself, and everyone spawns on the same giant map, and the mission is to be the last one standing. Usually, in this game type, there are weapons, health-packs, armour, defences, explosives, amongst other things dotted around the map as collectibles to use in assisting the players survival.

It is highly-anticipated that the Call of Duty franchise, more than likely in 2018’s COD launch, is going to be including the battle royales game type as an additional game mode in multiplayer, and just like with WW2’s multiplayer additional game mode for War, Treyarch’s 2018 COD title could make a unique multiplayer game mode titled Battle Royale, and just as with War add a whole bunch of uniquely giant maps.

(cc image, Wallhaven) - Forget Futuristic Warfare Settings, Call of Duty Needs Improved Gameplay Mechanics - Not Actual Futuristic Mechanics
(cc image, Wallhaven) - Forget Futuristic Warfare Settings, Call of Duty Needs Improved Gameplay Mechanics - Not Actual Futuristic Mechanics

No.9 - Redesigned Gameplay - A Definitive Change to Gameplay Design and Function

Call of Duty is a heavily multiplayer focused FPS franchise in 2018, and over the past few years the game - and the games multiplayer have been getting stale.

The multiplayer is the biggest fault to date, as the past few titles have not shuck things up a whole great deal, but rather keeping the standardised franchise a standardised game, each and every time.

The standards are growing tired, and just because the Call of Duty franchise has the best gameplay experience on the FPS gaming market isn’t to say it couldn’t be better, as sheer complacency in sticking to the current (for many, now the old) is preventing the CoD franchise from evolving at its core basics (gameplay, game design strategies, and stage of setting). Sure, the setting for the war era changes as the Call of Duty franchises progresses forward, but along the way the leaders have forgotten what inspired the making of the originals.

(cc image, Wiki - Fandom) - Call of Duty: World at War Menu Screen - Dark, Stacked with Suspense, and Visceral Deception - Since 2008, Call of Duty Titles Have Played Down the Blood, the Gore, and the Scary Mood Setting
(cc image, Wiki - Fandom) - Call of Duty: World at War Menu Screen - Dark, Stacked with Suspense, and Visceral Deception - Since 2008, Call of Duty Titles Have Played Down the Blood, the Gore, and the Scary Mood Setting

No.10 - Fifth Times the Charm - Bitter Blood, Gore and Devastating Violence

Treyarch studios are no stranger to the Call of Duty franchise, and arguably the best development for the franchise, as they are responsible for the development of four current Call of Duty titles that are available on the open gaming marketplace; 2008’s World at War, 2010’s Black Ops, 2012’s Black Ops 2, and 2015’s Black Ops 3.

Success and glory is the way we would describe the Black Ops series created by Treyarch studios for the Call of Duty franchise, as they were arguably the best told campaign stories in the COD franchise, and the statistics analysis has also proven that this was the series that saw the most engagement from players in the multiplayer section to the individual game titles.

Here’s the grevience, the Call of Duty franchise was once fairly graphic with violence, and more specifically in World at War, the official Call of Duty launch title for 2008. Now, we’re in 2018, and later this year Treyarch is getting prepared for the launch of their next Call of Duty title, and since Activision has been giving these long speeches about the Call of Duty franchise going back to its roots; having released the remaster for Call of Duty 4 in November of 2016, and having also brought the main Call of Duty launch title in 2017 back to the World War 2 era setting, it would only make sense that 2018 brings back roots for the Treyarch development house.

World War 2, not only the setting for Call of Duty 2017 (titled WWII), but also the decade ago roots for Treyarch studios, the head studio for Call of Duty 2018’s launch. World at War was great, but rumours support the Black Ops 4 release speculation, and that would be fine, but we still want similar gore and violence similar to that of World at War (campaign, multiplayer, and zombies mode).

© 2018 Dreammore

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