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Call of Duty: WWII Online ‘War’ Mode - Operation Neptune, Operation Breakout, Operation Griffin

Updated on November 8, 2017
Craig Easom profile image

Craig has been a writer on HubPages since 2013. He is currently studying for Marketing at Nottingham Trent University—in the land of Robin.

Call of Duty: WWII - the 'war' multiplayer mode returns - could this be the first sign of innovation from the developer, Sledgehammer Games, for the Call of Duty (multiplayer) franchise?
Call of Duty: WWII - the 'war' multiplayer mode returns - could this be the first sign of innovation from the developer, Sledgehammer Games, for the Call of Duty (multiplayer) franchise?

Is Call of Duty: WWII everything that fans have been hoping for? It has been approximately 8 years since the fans of Call of Duty first asked to see another World War 2 era title for the franchise, and this goes as far back as 2009’s Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2, as a certain selection of the franchises community were saddened to see the IP move back to the modern war era. That means that Call of Duty has not trod in the boots of the World War 2 military soldiers feet since 2008’s (Treyarch-made) World at War, the last traditionally made Call of Duty title, given that the franchise began its success in the first-person-shooter market in the World War 2 era setting.

2008’s World at War had a multiplayer mode called ‘war’, and this mode was a very early faze for something that would make the World War 2 online multiplayer experience unique to the time-era setting for the Call of Duty franchise. The mode was one of the few reasons why certain elements to World at War’s multiplayer were the way that they were. The ‘war’ mode enabled a much larger battlefield for online players to experience, and this included drivable military tanks from the World War 2 ally and axis forces, and the overall spectacle was something of a dream-come-true. The drivable tanks gave a whole new meaning to in-battle strategy, as now the enemy hideouts in bell towers, top floor buildings and wreckages could be wiped out with a single shot from the tanks blaster.

In 2017, 9 years after the release of Treyarch’s groundbreaking release of World at War we now have the definitive World War 2 era video-game for the Call of Duty franchise, titled “WWII”. Now, that is what you call a video-game innovation statement, and comes to explain the reason why the Battlefield franchise were so eager in recent years to release a World War I era video-game, as it stands for the competition staggering behind to require dramatic business modelling in order to stay ahead of the 8 ball. Many Call of Duty fans have been calling for a World War I era video-game since the recent launch of Sledgehammer Games Call of Duty: WWII. This could be a possibility in upcoming years, but as always, only time will tell.

Onto the topic for discussion today: the epic ‘war’ mode in Sledgehammer Games Call of Duty: WWII multiplayer. The ‘war’ mode is a multiplayer mode that Call of Duty traditionalists will be well aware of not being included in Call of Duty titles since way back in 2008’s World at War, and certainly stands to question the innovative status of the individual Call of Duty developers for not included a multiplayer game mode similar in activities over the past decade almost. In “WWII”, the ‘war’ mode is a multiplayer mode that requires the ally and axis teams to battle-out in a large map over the course of three objectives. Now, these objectives vary depending on the specific map, and to lay things in concrete these maps are large and therefore only exist in the ‘war’ multiplayer mode.

The first ‘war’ mode map in “WWII” is called Operation Neptune - In this particular map there are two teams, the allies and the axis, and your team is either attacking or defending various objective points on the map. Overall, there are three objectives (the same number for all ‘war’ mode maps), and the attacking team will first spawn in the ocean beside the Normandy beach, and the first objective is to storm the beach and successfully capture the bunkers that overlook the beach head. Meanwhile, the defending team must protect the bunkers at all cost, and man the turrets to eliminate all of the troops landing on the beach. Once the attacking team have captured the bunkers, they must now push up to the next enemy building located further in-land, and in this building there is communication machinery that must be destroyed. Meanwhile, the defending team must remain in the attacking building to protect the communication machinery from enemy destruction. The final objective requires the attacking team to push even further in-land to the artillery bunkers where they must plant three separate charges on the artillery to destroy them, and this is a process that must be repeated twice for both of the artillery bunkers. Meanwhile, the defending team must protect the artillery bunkers until the reinforcements arrive, and if a bomb is planted then a teammate must defuse it before it explodes.

The second ‘war’ mode map in “WWII” is called Operation Breakout - In this map there are two teams, the allies and the axis, and your team is either attacking or defending various objective points on the map (four in total). The attacking team will spawn at the edge of a town, and the first objective is dead ahead in the building where the team must secure the premises from the enemy forces. Meanwhile, the defending team must counter strike the enemy team and defend the first building objective at all costs until backup arrives. Next, the attacking team will have to push further in-land to the second objective which is the bridge that must be built in order to get the tank across, and it is vital that the supporting team members give covering fire to distract the enemy forces from shooting those building the structure of the bridge. Meanwhile, the defending team must apply direct fire onto the opposing forces to prevent the successful build of the bridge. The next objective requires the attackers to plant a bomb, and protect it from enemy forces until it blows. Meanwhile, the defending team must eliminate all opposing players that make attempts at planting the bomb, and were the bomb to be planted the team must defuse it immediately. The final objective requires the attacking team to escort the tank to the edge of the town where it will be tasked with blowing up the artillery barrage-infuser winning the match for the attacking team. Meanwhile, it is the final stand for the defending team who are now tasked with preventing the opposing teams tank from entering their location, at least until backup arrives.

The third ‘war’ mode map in “WWII” is called Operation Griffin - In this map there are two teams, the allies and the axis, and your team is either attacking or defending various objective points on the map (three in total). The attacking team will spawn at the edge of the map where they are tasked with escorting three tanks to the gates, whilst all-the-while defending the tanks from oncoming fire from the enemy team. Meanwhile, the defending team must prevent the opposing teams tanks from reaching the gates until the reinforcements arrive, and this is only a matter of time. The second objective requires the attacking team to load up the lead tank with fuel that can be attained at two various points around this objective, and to obtain the fuel simply stand next to the fuel point till your character switches to his side arm (now carrying the fuel container), then go back to your teams lead tank to fill it up with the fuel that you are now carrying, and then repeat this stage two more times to complete the objective successfully. Meanwhile, the defending team must build barricades, and defend the fuel depot points from the opposing forces that seek to steal away the fuel for their mission. Finally, the attacking team must successfully escort the lead tank to the end of the bridge before it is explodes by the enemy forces. Meanwhile, the defending team must clear out the opposing forces using extreme aggression in order of preventing them from escorting their tank to the end of the bridge, and if successful the bridge will be blown up.

There you have it, the three multiplayer maps for the ‘war’ mode in Sledgehammer Games Call of Duty: WWII.

Summary: The multiplayer ‘war’ mode in “WWII” was better than expected, and has definitely provided the much needed innovation for the Call of Duty multiplayer universe, as previous Call of Duty titles have remained weary and distant from story-like progressional systems in their multiplayer design. Clearly Sledgehammer Games have rose up to the occasion, and have provided a definitive piece of multiplayer entertainment that is the first of its kind. The ‘war’ mode has its own maps, comes with clearly constructed themes, and opens up the door to endless possibilities for enhancements in later DLC map pack releases (hopefully covering the ‘war’ mode) and future Call of Duty games.

One thing that strikes you most when playing the ‘war’ multiplayer mode maps is that it feels somewhat like competition for other franchises like Star Wars: Battlefront and Battlefield, but clearly the mode is not the entire games multiplayer so it does not stretch beyond the three-maps experience, but still an innovative direction from Sledgehammer Games that has more than earned its acceptance from the greater part of the Call of Duty community. Perhaps the greatest and most surprising element to the ‘war’ mode is the scene at the start of Operation Neptune when the attacking team storm from the seashores to the Normandy beach, whilst all the while the defending team man the turrets in the risen bunkers overlooking the beachfront. What was so amazing about this scene is that Sledgehammer Games added in AI players to also storm from the boats and onto the beach, and the kill-equivalence on the AI’s is 10XP (not 70XP), and once they have been killed once they are dead entirely, whereas the real attacking players will have unlimited lives. This is only a minor detail, as it makes for a fairer and more exciting start to the Neptune mission, but is a great leap forward for the Call of Duty multiplayer platform as a whole. Success in innovation typically leads to an expansion of similar innovation, or an exasperation of innovation failures. So, basically the Call of Duty developers will have to react to the innovation with a mode of similar distinction, and so the ‘war’ mode could be the start of something truly exciting as a hallmark in Sledgehammer Games Call of Duty title endeavours.

© 2017 Dreammore

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    • Junaid7 profile image

      Junaidul Islam Zihad 

      9 months ago from Bangladesh

      Thanks

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