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Fun Games for the Home

Updated on February 6, 2015

Apples to Apples

Apples to Apples is a party game originally published by Out of the Box Publishing, and now published by Mattel. The object of the game is to win the most rounds by playing a "red apple" card (which generally features a noun) from one's hand to best "match" that round's communal "green apple" card (which contains an adjective) as voted on by that round's judging player. The game is designed for four to ten players and played for 30–60 minutes.

Apples to Apples was chosen by Mensa International in 1999 as a "Mensa Select" prizewinner, an award given to five games each year.[1] It was also named "Party Game of the Year" in the December 1999 issue of Games magazine[2] and received the National Parenting Center's seal of approval in May 1999.[3] The popularity of the game led to an increased interest in similar card-matching/answer-judging party games. (Source)

Cards Against Humanity

Cards Against Humanity is a party game for horrible people. Unlike most of the party games you've played before, Cards Against Humanity is as despicable and awkward as you and your friends.

The game is simple. Each round, one player asks a question from a black card, and everyone else answers with their funniest white card. You can choose how many white cards it takes to win the game, but typically the game is so funny that you will keep playing until all the white cards are gone.

It's basically Apples to Apples, just a really perverted adult version.

Scattergories

Scattergories is a creative-thinking category-based party game produced by Hasbro through the Milton Bradley Company and published in 1988. The objective of the 2-to-6-player game is to score points by uniquely naming objects within a set of categories, given an initial letter, within a time limit. An example would be if one player rolled the letter 'T' and the category card (consisting of 12 separate ideas) had the some of the following: Countries, Colors, Boy's Names, Snadwiches, College Majors.

In 1989 Milton Bradley published a "refill" pack for Scattergories. It consists of 18 cards with 144 new categories and contains 6 new answer pads.

(Source)

Cornhole

Cornhole, also known as Tailgate[1] Toss, bean bag toss, corn toss, baggo or bags and even Lawn Darts For Drunks[citation needed] is a lawn game in which players take turns throwing bags of corn at a raised platform with a hole in the far end. A bag in the hole scores 3 points, while one on the platform scores 1 point. Play continues until a team or player reaches the score of 21.

In order to score, the bags must either be tossed into the hole or land on the board. A bag that falls through the hole is worth a value of three points. The bag can be tossed directly into the hole, slide into the hole, or be knocked into the hole by another bag. A bag that lands on the board and is still on the board at the end of the inning is worth one point. If a bag touches the ground and comes to rest on the board, it is removed from the board prior to continuation of play and not worth any points. Usually, cancellation scoring is used. In one version of cancellation scoring, bags that fall in the hole and bags that land on the board that are pitched by opponents during an inning cancel each other out.

(Source)

Kan Jam

KanJam was created in the 1980s by Charles Sciandra and Paul Swisher in Buffalo, New York, originally being called "Trash Can Frisbee". The game was mostly played locally in the Buffalo area until the mid 1990s, when Sciandra and Swisher established a company.[1][2] The developers sought a patent for the concept but ran into problems distinguishing it from other pre-existing games—most notably the game of Tiddlywinks—although this obstacle was overcome through the introduction of the "instant win" feature.[2][3] After several years of development, a patent was granted and KanJam went on sale in 2005.[2]

Sales started after the developers were able to sell the game to schools in North Tonawanda, the district in which Swisher works as a science teacher, as part of their physical education program. In 2006, Swisher sold his share to Mitchel Rubin. Sciandra and Rubin reorganized the company and founded Kan Jam LLC, made the game more retail- and user-friendly, and began selling games from their basement. By 2007, approximately 14,000 units were sold. They moved their operation to a larger facility.[2][4]

Kan Jam is now played in all 50 states, across Canada, the Caribbean, Australia, New Zealand, across Europe and many other countries around the world.

Variations of the original game include Kan Jam Mini and Kan Jam Splash. Kan Jam Mini is designed to be played indoors or out, on table tops, the floor and anywhere it fits. The Kan Jam Mini has a smaller goal and disc than the original game. Kan Jam Splash is designed to be played in water and has a buoyant base. The Kan Jam Splash also has a smaller sized goal and disc. (Source)

Trivial Pursuit

Trivial Pursuit is a board game in which progress is determined by a player's ability to answer general knowledge and popular culture questions. The game was created in December 1979 in Montreal, Quebec, by Canadian Chris Haney, a photo editor for Montreal's The Gazette, and Scott Abbott, a sports editor for The Canadian Press. After finding pieces of their Scrabble game missing, they decided to create their own game.[1] With the help of John Haney and Ed Werner, they completed development of the game, which was released in 1982.[2]

In North America, the game's popularity peaked in 1984, a year in which over 20 million games were sold.[citation needed] The rights to the game were initially licensed to Selchow and Righter in 1982, then to Parker Brothers (now part of Hasbro) in 1988, after initially being turned down by the Virgin Group; in 2008 Hasbro bought out the rights in full, for US$80 million.[3] As of 2004, nearly 88 million games had been sold in 26 countries and 17 languages. Northern Plastics of Elroy, Wisconsin produced 30,000,000 games between 1983 and 1985. In December 1993, Trivial Pursuit was named to the "Games Hall of Fame" by Games magazine. An online version of Trivial Pursuit was launched in September 2003.[4]

Dozens of question sets have been released for the game. The question cards are organized into themes; for instance, in the standard Genus question set, questions in green deal with science and nature. Some question sets have been designed for younger players, and others for a specific time period or as promotional tie-ins (such as Star Wars, Saturday Night Live, and The Lord of the Rings movies). (Source)

Monopoly

Monopoly is an American-originated board game originally published by Parker Brothers. Subtitled "The Fast-Dealing Property Trading Game", the game is named after the economic concept of monopoly—the domination of a market by a single entity. It is produced by the United States game and toy company Hasbro. Players move around the gameboard buying or trading properties, developing their properties with houses and hotels, and collecting rent from their opponents, the ultimate goal being to drive them into bankruptcy.

(Source)

Clue

Cluedo /ˈkld/, or Clue in North America, is a murder mystery game devised by Anthony E. Pratt from Birmingham, England and published by the United States game and toy company Hasbro, which acquired its U.S. publisher Parker Brothers, and Waddingtons with the object of the game being to strategically move around the game board (representing the rooms of a mansion), each in the guise of one of the game's six characters, collecting clues from which to deduce who murdered the game's victim who was named Dr. Black in the UK version and Mr. Boddy in North American versions, in which room the crime took place, and which weapon was used to commit the murder.

Numerous games, books, and a film have been released as part of the Cluedo franchise. Several spinoffs have been released featuring various extra characters, weapons and rooms, or different game play. The original game is marketed as the "Classic Detective Game", while the various spinoffs are all distinguished by different slogans.

In 2008, Cluedo: Discover the Secrets was created (with changes to board, gameplay and characters) as a modern spinoff.

(Source)

Life (The Game of Life)

The Game of Life, also known simply as LIFE, is a board game originally created in 1860 by Milton Bradley, as The Checkered Game of Life (and later produced by the Milton Bradley Company of Springfield, Massachusetts). The Game of Life was America's first popular parlor game.[1][2] The game simulates a person's travels through his or her life, from college to retirement, with jobs, marriage, and possible children along the way. Two to six players can participate in one game. Variations of the game accommodate eight to ten players.

The modern version was originally published 100 years later, in 1960. It was created by toy and game designer Reuben Klamer[3] and was "heartily endorsed" by Art Linkletter. It is now part of the permanent collection of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. It later spawned a book, The Game of Life: How to Succeed in Real Life No Matter Where You Land (Running Press), by Lou Harry. (Source)

Jenga

Jenga is a game of physical and mental skill created by Leslie Scott, and currently marketed by Parker Brothers, a division of Hasbro. During the game, players take turns removing one block at a time from a tower constructed of 54 blocks. Each block removed is then balanced on top of the tower, creating a progressively taller but less stable structure.

For more interesting Jenga, draw different actions on the Jenga tiles and the person that pulls that action must do it before continuing.

Jenga is derived from a Swahili word meaning "to build."[1]

(Source)

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