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Joy of Error Collecting part3

Updated on June 25, 2010

Moring Estate Collection

1958D Lincoln Wheat Penny (obverse)  Obverse Doubled Die
1958D Lincoln Wheat Penny (obverse) Obverse Doubled Die
Close up of the face doubling from the nose to the bow tie, the 19 in the date are also doubled die.
Close up of the face doubling from the nose to the bow tie, the 19 in the date are also doubled die.
another close up,
another close up,
reverse of the above coin,
reverse of the above coin,
195? Lincoln Wheat Penny (Obverse)  The weight is 42 grains which is approximatly 6 grains to light.
195? Lincoln Wheat Penny (Obverse) The weight is 42 grains which is approximatly 6 grains to light.
as seen on the reverse this coin was stamped on a thin planchet.
as seen on the reverse this coin was stamped on a thin planchet.
1960 Nickel (obverse)
1960 Nickel (obverse)
Reverse Doubled Die  This was a pocket change coin.
Reverse Doubled Die This was a pocket change coin.
1972S Ike Dollar Doubled die on the Obverse from under the nose to the LIBER in LIBERTY.
1972S Ike Dollar Doubled die on the Obverse from under the nose to the LIBER in LIBERTY.
cose up
cose up
close up
close up
Reverse
Reverse

 Aloha Everyone;

Wow it is great to be alive. I went through some more of my pictures and wanted to post a few more and talk about them.

First of all I want you all to know that there is a fortune in your pocket change. The nickel that is being pictured today was found in my pocket change. I will post more in the weeks to come that have been found by saving my change, then later when I have the time look at them under a lamp using my 10X eye glass. You can have a nice error coin collection just by going through your pocket change like this.

All of the coins that you are looking at in these photos will be going to a certification company to be certified and put in a protective case. You can sell coins like this on Ebay, but to get the real value you need to certify them and put them on a large coin auction. For example I observed a 1965 silver dime, they quit making silver dimes in 1964, this was an error coin. The coin sold on Ebay for about $900.00. Another coin, a 1965 silver dime a few months later which was certified and auctioned at a regular coin auction, sold for a whopping $12,000.00.

Educate yourself on what you have or use someone you can trust to give you good sound advice on your coins. There are a number of coin certification companies available to certify you coins for a fee. I have personally used PCGS, NGC and will be using ANACS for my error coins. These three are at the top of the list.

As with the certification companies there are also a number of top coin auction companies. I use Heritage Auction for my coins. Heritage Auction Company has an archive of their past auctions. I use these for valuation purposes of my coins and my friends collections. Most normal coins that are found in pocket change that looks great to the naked eye are going to grade in the AU area. (almost uncirculated). Others that look perfect to the naked eye will grade in the MS (mint state) condition. Most of these range in the MS-60 to the MS-65 area. I have looked at a lot of coins through my 10X glass that I would have graded MS-65 and had them certified MS-66. I have looked at millions of coins in order to get good at knowing pretty close to where they will grade.

Ok enough for now. Enjoy the pictures.

Aloha,

Bruce Moring

PCGS has a great price guide for coins. I have used their guide to give

A great price

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