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Prince of Persia 2008-bargin bin game review

Updated on July 16, 2014

Prince of Persia 2008 review

healing the land is

healing the land is your main goal in POP 2008
healing the land is your main goal in POP 2008

Well I decided to get a game I have wanted for a few years now, and now that it is in the bargain bin for under 5 dollars used I decided now was the perfect time to buy it. The game is the 2008 reboot (pfft) of the Prince of Persia. Reboot has in it didn’t go anywhere, the next game belong in the Sands of Time universe, and it looks like the Prince has been assassinated by some white robed Assassins with a creed. Has we haven’t heard of the Prince in several years.

Graphics

Oh my god do I love the way this game looks. 2nd to Okami when it comes to unique art style that works well in this game. The cel shaded visuals give it a unique illustrated look. But it’s just more than just pretty color it’s how the game uses them. Yeah the corrupted areas are all dark and evil but they don’t just look simply black and covered with goo (although plenty of places are) but rather 3 out of 4 of these places look like your running through them at night (the 4th has a green smoky polluted look). And you get some very pretty night time colors on rocks and buildings has you run past them. Healing a fertile ground all though doesn’t send an explosion of flower power color at you still changes the way the area look into a more daytime area. Healing all of them can drastically change a way the place looks when it comes to color changing it to a peaceful sunny summer day.


One of my favorite areas the citadel for example before you heal it has a giant black hole whirl pool of sand beneath you. Healing the land turns it into a green tropical lake. All the areas have a unique beauty all of their own and it is just a joy to run through and experience them.

Sound.

We get some good Persian esc music from the sound track. The voices in this game are pretty good with the Prince being played by Nolan North who has done a lot of voice work in his career. Most notably he has played the Marvel Super Hero Deadpool in his game. He also does the voice of Nathan Drake in Uncharted. And for Ubisoft he has done the voice of Desmond Miles (ok so not all the characters he plays are memorable for the right reasons). And Elka is voiced by Kari Whalgren who also has a huge list of credits to note including play Ashe on Final Fantasy XII, and Lady from Devil May Cry 3,.


All in all nothing is wrong with the sound.

Too bad the gameplay isn't perfect

It’s too bad I can’t say the gameplay is perfect.

If you never played a Prince of Persia game before let me say its main focus is on its park our platforming. The main idea is to solve puzzle and get around obstacles by using a physic defying set of park our tricks. You will be running on walls, climbing on ledges, and bouncing from place to place to get around.


Figuring out when to jump, and where is pretty much the aim of the game, you will make mistakes on the platforming sections and the game is design for you to do it. The game however runs much more automatically then Sands of Time this can actually add to the frustration rather than take away from it. Sometimes you don’t know whether to press the A button to run or not to because if your wrong about the A button rather than continuing a wall run you will jump to your doom (or until Eleka catches you) and have to start the whole thing over again.


Yeah let me get to one of my main complaints and that is Eleka with her around you can’t technically die. Rather every time you make a fatal mistake she catches you and brings you back to the last safe area you were in. If you think that this makes the game less frustrating then the sands of time series you would be mistaken. In that series you had a limit amount of the sands of time to rewind time when you made a mistake but where you stopped it was your decision. Therefore a mistake wouldn’t send you to far back unless you ran out of the sands. In Prince of Persia 2008 however it is make a mistake and you start the whole platforming section over again. While this may not be a big deal 9 times out of 10 but when you get into a complicated section of platforms expect to be frustrated when you are thrown back quite a distance.


While I may not like how they make mistakes I love how they open the world up, your now pretty much free to explore where you want. This is done because each area is more like a highway, To get to the fertile grounds though you have to have special plates activated so you won’t be able to access certain areas at first. However your free to wonder around that highway has much has you please until you do activate the plates.


How do you activate the plates well after you purified each ground light seeds will appear. Collecting enough life seeds will allow you to activate a plate by the temple. This is another one of my small complaints. The purified areas look gorgeous and are worth playing through again just to take a 2nd look. Unfournatley all Ubisoft could do too reward/make you explore the purified areas is a gimp version of Pac-man.

Finally there is the combat system which is well terrible. I admired what Ubisoft was trying to do one on this one, swashbuckling adventure, with one on one combat. It ends up has a mess that feels like a button mashing and sometimes pointless fighter. Basically the idea is to either swing your sword, grab them with your gauntlet, or throw Eleka at them for a magic attack to do damage. Comboing them can be effective, if you get an ordinary enemy to the side of the arena you can automatically win. Bosses however are a lot more different with the exception of one you have to finish off their health bar (the one that is the exception can only be killed off by knocking him into a trap in the arena). They can also shield themselves and force you start your combo with a certain button to do damage. Oh and you can’t die during these fights either, I mean you literally can’t die. If you lose in a fight Eleka will step in to save you just like in the platfomring, however the boss gets a huge chunk of their life bar back.


Oh and about these bosses you don’t fight each one once, nor do you fight them twice, not even 3 times, but up to 6 times. That’s just a little bit repeative in my book.

Achievements

For the most part achievements are pretty easy to pick up. Just play the game wisely and make sure you listen to Eleka whenever there is a dialogue box and you will get most of them with a standard play through. There are a few speed runs and some extra boss conditions that will require more than one play through if missed. The only ones that take time though are the seed collecting achievements which require you to find all 1,000 seeds if you want to unlock them all.


However there is one called To Be Continued that does piss me off. It’s easy enough to get it unlocks by beating the game. Yeah the game ends on a cliff hanger, with obvious sequel being made. However no sequel has been made in over 6 years. Yeah it looks like Assassins Creed manage to finish off Prince of Persia franchise. A year after this Assassins Creed 2 came out and was a really big seller, since then ubisoft has been pushing out AC every year. I actually don’t mind this because I like assassins creed. However if I were to compare the Prince of Persia 2008 to the original AC and decide which one is more deserving of a sequel that is another matter. I will explained next time I do a bargain bin hub.

Final Recommendation.

Anyways you can pick up Prince of Persia 2008 for like 4 dollars out at gamestop use. It’s worth the price but the game is not perfect.


I would pay about 10-15 dollars for it. Steam if your looking to go digital on PC has it for that price. Unfortunately PSN and Xbox live are still a little high with 20 dollars being the regular price.

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