ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

RITES OF PASSAGE FOR A MODEL RAILWAY - 27: THORPE CARR, A Space-saving Mini Layout In Progress

Updated on April 10, 2017

Progress so far - work on the 'outer shell' comes on apace

The coal depot end of the mini-layout, the preliminary outline of the 'shell' will enable scenic work to go ahead. (Reminds me, the walkway's got work to be done before it can be fixed down).
The coal depot end of the mini-layout, the preliminary outline of the 'shell' will enable scenic work to go ahead. (Reminds me, the walkway's got work to be done before it can be fixed down). | Source

What's in a name? If you create a freelance location, fit a station name to an area to make it 'authentic'

A view of Star Carr in the Vale of Pickering, an archaeological site near Pickering, once at the edge of the lake that extended across the width of the dale east towards Scarborough.
A view of Star Carr in the Vale of Pickering, an archaeological site near Pickering, once at the edge of the lake that extended across the width of the dale east towards Scarborough.

First things first, find a name for the beast: how 'Thorpe Carr' came about.

Remember what I said about finding a name for a layout that would be apt for the area or region represented by your layout?

In the case of this little layout, I thought I'd set the scene in a fictitious location near the Yorkshire Wolds. Many village names in the region involve the word 'thorpe', the adapted Danish word ['torp') for a settlement smaller than a 'by' or town, and bigger than a 'toft' or 'garth', meaning farm. There's also 'kirk', or church, that features in countless place names. That's got one part of the name fixed. Again many villages have double names. A physical landscape feature might come in handy. The small layout I did for my son involved the word 'rigg', dialect for ridge. There is a fair amount of reclaimed marsh land around Ryedale (between the North Yorkshire Moors and Yorkshire Wolds) in North Yorkshire, named 'carrs', also from the 9th Century Danish settlement of the region and originating in the word 'karre', carried on in the dialect word 'carr'.

So I settled on the name 'Thorpe Carr' for the station, coal and goods depot that would serve a farming community and its local area. The theme harks back to an era when the railway still fulfilled a social function in providing a means to get to market towns (Pickering and Malton were the centres in Ryedale). Farm produce had to be forwarded to urban centres such as Scarborough, York and further afield. There was a whole cluster of woollen mill and business centres around Leeds and Bradford etc.

Most small stations had some function to handle coal for small industry, heating homes, businesses and schools. This is just before the decade of closures, (railways, local schools, cottage hospitals), where village life went on as before when the railways first arrived and 'wagon load' was still the railway's ethos, before block trains and bulk loadings saw a marked change in transport.

In the map below, navigate around north-eastward and eastward from Malton along the edge of the hills, the Wolds. Take a look at the names and see if you could come up with an apt name that would fit,

Malton, North Yorkshire

Back to basics - this page will be added to for you to check on progress until the project is complete

Seen from the projected Thorpe Carr station end, the track formation's been arranged but not yet fixed down. Bottom right-hand corner is the coal depot with space for four bays (to accommodate two twin hopper wagons)
Seen from the projected Thorpe Carr station end, the track formation's been arranged but not yet fixed down. Bottom right-hand corner is the coal depot with space for four bays (to accommodate two twin hopper wagons) | Source
The 48 x 15 inch frame completed, risers attached to four intermediate cross-members between the frame sides, 3-ply board cut to shape and screwed onto risers. Peco track shuffled into position and assembled...
The 48 x 15 inch frame completed, risers attached to four intermediate cross-members between the frame sides, 3-ply board cut to shape and screwed onto risers. Peco track shuffled into position and assembled... | Source
Station platform building (Aherne trophy, 2015) in situ to show where platform goes, with coal depot in front. Open area to be completed with scenery and ramp to main road. Latitude for scenic detail.
Station platform building (Aherne trophy, 2015) in situ to show where platform goes, with coal depot in front. Open area to be completed with scenery and ramp to main road. Latitude for scenic detail. | Source
as well as the runner-up, another aspect of the goods shed that will occupy the forward part of the area opposite the coal depot
as well as the runner-up, another aspect of the goods shed that will occupy the forward part of the area opposite the coal depot | Source

Material was recycled from an earlier layout.

An ample supply of timber was at hand, mainly 2 X 1 inch, 2 X 1/2 inch and 3 X 1 inch for battens.

These will be added at either end to secure against undue pressure in manhandling the completed frame. The aim of the game was to put together a small layout I could transport on the back seats of the car I currently drive. Measuring lengthwise gave me a comfortable 48 inches with a depth of 15 inches (as on Thoraldby), which gives ample space for track area and scenery. Layout height should be no more than, say 12 inches from footing to backdrop top edge. It will be a single table-top unit anyway, so there's no problem with support.

The frame was assembled with four intermediate cross-braces, to which the risers were screwed to support the 'ground level'. The coal depot area was sunk below the main level, attached to lower risers and linked to the main level by a narrow ply 'road'. This in turn will be linked to a road ramp up to the bridge that divides the two halves. Another ramp will descend to the goods shed yard on the far side for delivery vans or four-wheeled flatbed lorries.

After building Thoraldby I still had a sizeable cache of Peco Steamline and Setrack points, and plain track - straight and curved - in different lengths. (Even after this exercise there'll be enough for a longer layout). I still had to buy a few shorter radius right-hand Setrack points and shorter track sections to fit into the space allotted.

With restrictions things can get tricky, and options reduced. All the same in Double O Gauge (4mm scale body size with 3.5 mm track gauge, a weird post-WWII compromise that halved O Gauge track dimensions but used 4mm scale on other elements) you can still arrive at a workable solution. With some jiggery-pokery I reached a satisfactory solution. Eureka! I think the running should be interesting as far as shunting is concerned. I was still unhappy with one element, to keep a reasonable length of track that will take a small goods or passenger working.

Get help with your own projects

On the DOGA Forum. e-mail the members with your queries and watch the solutions crop up. alternatively you might be able to offer advice on projects from your own experience. This is the railway modelling group for modellers in far-flung places, or who haven't the time for weekly get-togethers. Regional groups are on the rise, and there are members across the globe who've joined to get help or suggestions with problems encountered in the hobby. Use the link to see if it's for you.

A step forward - getting the track sorted on the way into the station, and at the coal depot

Trackwork adjusted by inserting a large radius Peco Streamline 'Y' point where the right-hand No.2 radius point was. Single slip reversed to ease passage of pick-up goods locomotive around its short train..
Trackwork adjusted by inserting a large radius Peco Streamline 'Y' point where the right-hand No.2 radius point was. Single slip reversed to ease passage of pick-up goods locomotive around its short train.. | Source
Now at the front of the goods shed there's more space for delivery vehicles. The roadway access ramp will slope down to the right (off-scene). An underpass will give access to the coal depot
Now at the front of the goods shed there's more space for delivery vehicles. The roadway access ramp will slope down to the right (off-scene). An underpass will give access to the coal depot | Source
The grey underlay foam has been roughly cut to shape for the track formation, track in the coal depot suspended over the opening between buffer stop heading and main area
The grey underlay foam has been roughly cut to shape for the track formation, track in the coal depot suspended over the opening between buffer stop heading and main area | Source
With intermediate sleepers removed, the coal depot track is overlaid where it will be fixed once the timber deck is in place
With intermediate sleepers removed, the coal depot track is overlaid where it will be fixed once the timber deck is in place | Source
Coal depot takes shape. Track fixed down against the back support to allow space for gangway timbering. Struts along the tops of the cell walls will separate cells and support intermediate sleepers. Front ribbing to follow
Coal depot takes shape. Track fixed down against the back support to allow space for gangway timbering. Struts along the tops of the cell walls will separate cells and support intermediate sleepers. Front ribbing to follow | Source
View along the deck level shows supports under the track and outer face made up of Evergreen 'H', 'I' and rectangular section, Supports to be added along the outer edge of the cell walls for the walkway, as well as between inner edge and back wall
View along the deck level shows supports under the track and outer face made up of Evergreen 'H', 'I' and rectangular section, Supports to be added along the outer edge of the cell walls for the walkway, as well as between inner edge and back wall | Source
Ballasting's been added right up to the coal depot end wall.now the rails have been fixed in place across the cells.
Ballasting's been added right up to the coal depot end wall.now the rails have been fixed in place across the cells. | Source

Next steps, underlay and pre-ballast groundwork

Having decided on the track area, the underlay needed to be measured out, positioned and laid down ready for ballasting. The advantage of buying the foam underlay in rolls is that you decide how and where to cut. Use PVA or wood glue to fix it down. After I'd had it laid down for a few days I trimmed some off. Believe me, it did stick well! Spread the glue liberally over the area to be covered OR spread over the underside of your sheet. Do it the way you feel comfortable, in sections or in one. The PVA does not dry too quickly so you've got time, and remember to press down hard across the surface of the foam. Use a large steel rule if you've got one and push it steadily across the foam to ensure even spread. Leave at least over a few nights under weights. I used sawn 3 X 1 inch wood battens weighted down by hammers and other heavy items.

The track formation right of centre to the right of the single slip needed adjustment before ballasting, a large radius Streamline 'Y' point inserted where the No.2 radius right-hand point was, next job being turning the single slip around to facilitate movement between the platform road around the loop to the bridge for the return movement (to 'pick up' empty coal hoppers from the depot and shunt full ones into the coal depot, (see also removable loads in ROPFAMR - 13: Open Merchandise Wagons & Lift-out loads, and ROPFAMR - 14: Miniaturised Minerals as well as ROPFAMR - 8: Minerals, Processable Solids). Now I can make a start on ballasting.

If you remember the Poppy's Woodtech ballasting box on the THORALDBY page, (ROPFAMR - 18) with its web link, (and the 4D shop in Leman Street, London E1 for materials, see that link also), this will come in handy now for what should be the most important stage. It worked well on Ayton Lane, so let's see how it goes (get this wrong and there's an expensive clearing job to do and replacements to buy - they don't come cheap!). As mentioned on the THORALDBY page, be careful around pointwork, don't rush the job. Be sparing with the ballast, 'dribble' it in between the sleepers here but not near movable parts and drip in the diluted PVA or wood glue (the latter might be more expensive but it's stronger). I've got three syringes, bought at the 4D shop for the purpose. Well worth the outlay, and remember don't dilute it too much or you'll find yourself doing the job again. Add washing-up liquid to the mixture, this will help it to spread evenly through the ballast. Watch it doesn't spread towards working parts on the pointwork, take a scrap of cloth or a square-ended brush (size 3 or 4) and wipe off the flow before it looks as if it'll get there. Brush away loose ballast near point levers, allow an eighth to a quarter of an inch for movement either side. You can always carefully paint the area to disguise the gap.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I shall add more information and advice as I go along with this page, so keep a weather eye out for it. Bookmark it and be sure to check back periodically after weekends after I've had a chance to push the project onward.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Clearly written tips to achieve best results for small spaces, I've had a copy of this and several other books by this author on railway modelling. The concept works in O Gauge even, as shown in a number of pictures of Ditchling Green on the Southern Railway! Lots of diagrams of 'box' units and support frames with an eye on weight limitation. Decide on your choice of operating area, era and available space. Select your materials, light is best for handling - crucial if you mean to transport your layout to exhibitions. Work out your track, where signalling goes, and other permanent way features, basic scenics decide the general geography. Here's where your skills come in use, in woodwork, spacial conception and model-making. Then get to work on detailing features, road access, buildings etc All the advice and more to get you - and keep you - going, to the best solution for your needs.

Getting underway, what do you need for ballasting work?

The tools for the ballasting job: large syringes suitable for pushing through dilated PVA/wood glue solution + washing-up liquid, jar of ballast (ash) and Poppy's Woodtech box with its 'chute' and lateral slot to allow an even flow of ballast
The tools for the ballasting job: large syringes suitable for pushing through dilated PVA/wood glue solution + washing-up liquid, jar of ballast (ash) and Poppy's Woodtech box with its 'chute' and lateral slot to allow an even flow of ballast | Source

There's nothing worse than getting your platform face and surface in place, than to find locomotives or carriages get stuck

And if you want to exhibit it's embarrassing. I've seen it for myself at an exhibition, where.the scenery, stock, locomotives were first rate. Everything was finely detailed, but passenger trains wouldn't move because the builder hadn't taken care his platform outer edges allowed trains to pass smoothly. As it was based on pre-WWI North Eastern Railway (Northumberland) practice I'd looked forward to seeing the layout. That flaw left me disappointed. I don't think the operator was too happy with it, either.

Going on, a good way to judge clearances on curves - if you haven't got a diagram from one of the railway modelling magazines or sites - is to run a locomotive and carriages along the proposed site of the station and mark with a joiner's pencil where carriage or brake van step-boards, or locomotive cylinders stick out over the sleeper ends. In some places platforms were lower than the passenger step-boards, which make the modeller's job easier. Then there were the bogie step-boards. The NER/GNR and GER had them, the LNER continued the tradition and British Railways Eastern or North Eastern Region only did away with them by the 1960s. If your LNER/BR layout is based before the 1960s you have to take this into consideration.

Then there are also the side and overhead clearances. Again the diagram shows you how to achieve the 'mean'. On many branchline routes in Britain clearances were fairly close in tunnels or under bridges (something the railway engineers in the New World, Australia, Southern Africa or New Zealand didn't have to consider in most places, except for getting through the Appalachians, the Rockies, Blue Mountains or New Zealand Alps). Model railway clubs and railway historical societies have the diagram somewhere in their literature.

The only affected places on this small railway layout are the station, beside the goods shed, under the approach bridge and the single track tunnel mouth at the station throat, so engineering work isn't unduly stretched. You decide on your parameters.

Work continued lately on the station area as a prelude to ballasting. A wall at the back of the coal depot was built to incorporate a dividing wall in front of the station platform. The North Eastern Railway often raised walls to prevent passengers being deluged with coal dust when the wagons dropped their loads into the cells (see picture above). At the same time the bridge abutments were added either side of the running lines. Signal posts will be added wide of the ballasting profile, so ballasting can be begun as and when. I shall keep you posted...

Track and basic scenery, ballasting progress, platform clearance and low level work

A catch or trap point was added to the coal depot approach, right-hand to deflect runaway wagons away from the platform road.
A catch or trap point was added to the coal depot approach, right-hand to deflect runaway wagons away from the platform road. | Source
With the platform road ballasted, time to work towards and around the pointwork. Use heavy-ish tools to weigh down ballasted track until it's set. Give it 24-48 hours in dry cellar conditions
With the platform road ballasted, time to work towards and around the pointwork. Use heavy-ish tools to weigh down ballasted track until it's set. Give it 24-48 hours in dry cellar conditions | Source
Around pointwork 'dribble' the ballast sparingly between the sleepers. Drip the pva mixture carefully and dry-brush away spillages. Where the pva threatens to encroach on point levers, brush away speedily, taking care to keep clear of moving parts.
Around pointwork 'dribble' the ballast sparingly between the sleepers. Drip the pva mixture carefully and dry-brush away spillages. Where the pva threatens to encroach on point levers, brush away speedily, taking care to keep clear of moving parts. | Source
Intermediate results look good. Ballast needs to be added and fixed down to the right of the track formation here. This is a day after work continued.
Intermediate results look good. Ballast needs to be added and fixed down to the right of the track formation here. This is a day after work continued. | Source
Ballasting done past the pointwork on the 'Up' end  At left is the way into the goods shed where a wagon weigh bridge should be added in front of the office window. Centre is the shunt road, right is the 'Up' road out (probably under a skew bridge)
Ballasting done past the pointwork on the 'Up' end At left is the way into the goods shed where a wagon weigh bridge should be added in front of the office window. Centre is the shunt road, right is the 'Up' road out (probably under a skew bridge) | Source
The shunt road on the outside around the goods shed...
The shunt road on the outside around the goods shed... | Source
The goods office and doorway where a Pooley goods wagon/van weighbridge should be added in due course
The goods office and doorway where a Pooley goods wagon/van weighbridge should be added in due course | Source

Aids to good ballasting

You have to be careful on ballasting, as you do with your clearances. The first consideration should be for tools to make the task easy. I've added the web site above for the Poppy's Woodtech ballasting hopper (you make it up yourself using pva or similar adhesive).

At the 4D shop in Leman Street, London E1 you'll find the large syringes to apply diluted pva (make sure you add household washing-up liquid so that the solution spreads over the ballasted area. As I've mentioned on the Thoraldby page, be careful around pointwork/turnouts. The 'minimalist' approach will see you right. Where necessary apply with a small brush (size 0 or 1) by dripping the diluted mixture. You can always wash out the pva with warm, soapy water and squeeze away the residue to use the brush for painting.I shall use ash ballast on this short branchline, as the NER and its successors did until the 1960s in some areas where the expenditure on high grade granite ballast was not considered warranted. I've ordered Woodland Scenics' Medium Cinders (pack 883) for the job, as I used it on Ayton Lane Shed (Thoraldby layout).

Get a good plastic or unbreakable glass jar to pour in your ballast and scoop it out when needed. Packets are easily dropped, contents scattered. Great for suppliers but not for you. Likewise get a jar for your pva solution, to draw up into the syringe. Experiment with your solution, but don't make it too thick or it clots up the syringe. Too runny and you'll find yourself doing the job again. Where I've used it on Thoraldby it sets like concrete and the only way of undoing errors could be costly, resulting in the purchase of new points/turnouts. The ready made ones are pretty pricey these days.

From the same source (John Dutfield at Chelmsford) I've ordered the Wills coarse stone (plastic moulding) for the coal depot and overbridge walls. To attach plastic to wood I use wood glue, similar to pva but stronger, (for furniture joints) and drip superglue onto the surface before 'mating' the plastic with the wood. Once it's set, try prising it apart!

Ballasting's almost completed, buffer stops to be added before being 'half-buried' in ash ballast

The track on the right will be covered by another road after the Peco power clips have been added, and 'bled off' to fiddle yard. Centre is the wagon headshunt, left the 'stub' at the goods shed's back door.
The track on the right will be covered by another road after the Peco power clips have been added, and 'bled off' to fiddle yard. Centre is the wagon headshunt, left the 'stub' at the goods shed's back door. | Source
One of the Slaters' North Eastern buffer stops will be placed at the end on the centre road here
One of the Slaters' North Eastern buffer stops will be placed at the end on the centre road here | Source

A few hints to avoid disappointment

It can't be said too often: take your time, take care and don't overload the ballasting hopper before you move it along (firm and steady, but not heavy-handed). You can always add a bit more, but too much at the outset can lead to problems getting rid of excess.

Do the ballasting in short sections between pointwork (turnouts), be sparing with the ballast but not miserly or you'll find you have to repeat the process, and before you get carried away with the 'white stuff' consider where the power input will go. There are a few ways of doing this, the obvious being a power clip.

As I have used Peco track, this manufacturer offers handy power clips that fit under the rails and can be hidden (and screwed down) under or immediately behind a bridge abutment, a building or trackside feature off scenery. Keep the clip clean, and install it in a way you can extract it for whatever reason. Other manufacturers have similar products. Or before you start any ballasting drill down either side of your track and insert cable to link up with an ac/dc power unit. I've seen several layouts this method has been used on, and it works. Consult a railway modelling electrics manual, or section in a book/magazine to see how this kind of power input is installed.

Back to ballasting: on ballasting around pointwork dribble small amounts of ballast below blades and drip in the adhesive mixture with a small brush (size 0-1), making sure none comes into contact with moving parts. Once a blade is bent out of true it is near impossible to correct and you'll find you have to extract the whole point unit, or put up with a faulty connection. Around points add ballast until it is level with the tops of adjacent sleepers, no more. When detailing surrounding scenery at a later stage, imperfections can be disguised with a bit of judicious paintwork or scatter (to look like weed or grass between rails).

Working on the coal and goods depots, and access roads

The goods shed's been secured in place, granite sets added to front. A connecting road needs to be laid in to the coal depot under the access road via a tunnel. Front 'bleeds off' the layout.
The goods shed's been secured in place, granite sets added to front. A connecting road needs to be laid in to the coal depot under the access road via a tunnel. Front 'bleeds off' the layout. | Source
Supports for the timber decking on the coal depot have been added, the decking laid on to show how it will look before the guard rails have been mounted. Buffer stop to add at the right, past the last cell drop.
Supports for the timber decking on the coal depot have been added, the decking laid on to show how it will look before the guard rails have been mounted. Buffer stop to add at the right, past the last cell drop. | Source

Steps toward 'proper' scenery

With ballasting almost complete and buffer stops to add, it's time to concentrate on basic, ground-level scenery. The goods shed has been secured on a 'platform' of plastic sheet, allowing space to support the Wills granite sets (SSMP 204) on a 'ramp' (for drainage). More was added around the building. The access road to the overbridge will be 'bled off' the scenery, and a tunnel for coal lorries created. A pedestrian underpass may also be added, using the Wills Cattle Creep kit.

The coal depot's coming on, supports added to the back wall for the nearside and offside timber walkway decking. See the image above that shows how the decking fits in. A ramp will be added adjacent to the high wall to ease access by foot from track level. Station masters usually had the coal merchant's concession, often trebling their pay packet.

Work on the station platform and 2D access to be continued once the back and end scenic walls have been added to the unit.

En-casing the joint

Behind the goods shed cut-outs were made where the 'back road' comes in and leaves the scenery, the batten serves to screw the corners together and support another to build the smaller overbridge onto.  Cut out near the corner for exit to fiddleyard
Behind the goods shed cut-outs were made where the 'back road' comes in and leaves the scenery, the batten serves to screw the corners together and support another to build the smaller overbridge onto. Cut out near the corner for exit to fiddleyard | Source
The front casing has been cut to depth, the gap between the stone sets and the front to be covered with plastic filler
The front casing has been cut to depth, the gap between the stone sets and the front to be covered with plastic filler | Source
Close-up of the coal depot corner, with the casing cut out to ground level and modelled around the end wall - the gap here also to be filled in.
Close-up of the coal depot corner, with the casing cut out to ground level and modelled around the end wall - the gap here also to be filled in. | Source
Where the twain meet - the back support for the goods/coal depot access road covers a small gap between the two board halves.
Where the twain meet - the back support for the goods/coal depot access road covers a small gap between the two board halves. | Source

Board work

A 4' X 2' sheet of .quarter inch ply (to keep the weight down) was cut at the shop into three 8" depth lengths and cut further to approximate size for the back, sides and front of the layout.

A separate fiddleyard will be added to feed trains onto this scenic unit, but first I need to get to the point where I've made satisfactory progress on this unit. Markings were made on the board, for further cuts. When I've got to the point of working on the backscene, I can do some more cutting for roof-lines etc.(if needed). The board still needs to be screwed on all the way around the unit, although you can see from these images roughly where it'll go from here. Cuts were made where bridges/road embankments enter and leave, for the low level coal depot and access road frontage (maybe part of a carr/marsh) as well as around the front of the goods shed.

Lots still to do. .

Roads, bridges and embankments

Plastic cut to approximate shape is tacked onto the formers to show where the road overbridges and embankments will go
Plastic cut to approximate shape is tacked onto the formers to show where the road overbridges and embankments will go | Source
From the side - this is where the longer bridge will be, of a vari-girder type with conventional road surface over steel frame with girder side sections according to width. In this case the bridge is supported on profiled stone abutments .
From the side - this is where the longer bridge will be, of a vari-girder type with conventional road surface over steel frame with girder side sections according to width. In this case the bridge is supported on profiled stone abutments . | Source
This is where a shorter, brick-walled bridge will be, that leads along the edge of the unit to be 'bled off' the scenery on the right near the goods depot.
This is where a shorter, brick-walled bridge will be, that leads along the edge of the unit to be 'bled off' the scenery on the right near the goods depot. | Source
The view from the front. The ramp down to the goods depot leads off to the right. An underpass will link this side to the coal depot (left side)
The view from the front. The ramp down to the goods depot leads off to the right. An underpass will link this side to the coal depot (left side) | Source

Just to see how the road links would work, I cut some plastic roughly to shape and pinned them down onto the formers behind the bridge abutments (where the road will cross over the railway on a vari-girder bridge), and on a descending gradient to where a ramp drops to the goods depot. Further to the right another, shorter, bridge will cross over the railway to take another road that will 'bleed off' the scenic unit behind the good depot. This will be a brick-sided bridge, and scenery will rise at the end to cover its rear.

Ancillary buildings, gangers' huts, coal offices etc

A couple of small buildings that can be located around the railway, one of which (on the left) after addition of a brick chimney or smoke stack would be suitable as a coal office
A couple of small buildings that can be located around the railway, one of which (on the left) after addition of a brick chimney or smoke stack would be suitable as a coal office | Source

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No comments yet.

    Click to Rate This Article