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US Silver Peace Dollars (1921-1935, 1964)

Updated on November 11, 2013

My Coin Blog

If you are interested, I just started a blog where I will be sharing information and some of my personal collection. You can stop by at:
www.ClarkCoins.com

A short introduction

I am a hobby coin collector, wouldn't quite consider myself a numismatist yet but certainly working towards that title. My personal coin collection focuses mainly on US coins, more pennies and silver coins than others. I do have a few world coins, and also a couple different foreign paper currency notes as well.

In this hub, I plan to share with you some information and history behind the US Silver Peace Dollar. So without further ado, I hope you enjoy!

1921 Peace Dollar From My Collection

My 1921 Peace Dollar (obverse). It has a smudge across it, but in my opinion, a beautiful coin nonetheless.
My 1921 Peace Dollar (obverse). It has a smudge across it, but in my opinion, a beautiful coin nonetheless. | Source
My 1921 Peace Dollar (reverse)
My 1921 Peace Dollar (reverse) | Source

The US Silver Peace Dollar (1921-1935, and 1964)

The Peace Dollar was first struck in December of 1921. Just over 1 million were struck, and released to the public on January 3, 1922. The mint initially struck them in high relief, but quickly realized that it was not practical for public trade use. All of the coins struck in 1921 were released in high relief, and the first 35,000 or so of the 1922 issue was struck this way as well. Because of its higher cost per unit production rate, nearly all of the 1922 Peace Dollars were kept by the mint and melted down. Because of this, very few 1922 high relief peace dollars are in existence today, and the ones that are out there are in high-end collections.

The Peace Dollar design was made by a famous medalist, by the name of Anthony de Francisci. The coin is 38.1mm in diameter, and weighs just under an ounce at 26.73 grams. It's composed of 90% pure silver and 10% copper. This works out to an actual silver weight of .77344 oz. Over it's relatively short-lived span from 1921-1935, it was minted at the three main modern mint locations of Philadelphia, Denver, and San Francisco.

Great Coin Collecting References

A Guidebook of United States Coins 2014: The Official Red Book
A Guidebook of United States Coins 2014: The Official Red Book

The most popular coin price guide, a must have for any collector

 

The 1964 Peace Dollar

A lesser known fact of the Peace Dollar, is that it was actually supposed to come back into commission in 1964. There was going to be a run of the latter Peace Dollar over the following years of 45 million more coins. 316,076 were struck in Denver in early 1965, dated 1964. The plans for this production were eventually scrapped and every 1964 Peace Dollar was melted down at the mint without ever leaving.

Contrary to some rumors out there, there are no 1964 Peace Dollars in existence. There are however, many fakes claiming to be ultra-rare 'leaked' coins from abandoned production run. So if you are ever in the market for collectible coins, DO NOT BUY any 1964 peace dollars, they are faked!

Key Dates For The Peace Dollar

Key dates of the Peace Dollar that many collector's are after, are:

1921 Peace Dollar - because it was the first year that it was issued, it was struck in high relief, and because of its relatively low mintage volume

1928 Peace Dollar - because it had the lowest mintage numbers of the entire series

1934D Double-Die Obverse Peace Dollar - because it is a harder to find variety of just over 1.5 million produced by the mint that year

For a full list of mintage numbers for the entire series, please see the chart below.

Peace Dollar Mintage Numbers

Year/Mint
Mintage
Year/Mint
Mintage
1921 High Relief
1,006,473
1926D
2,348,700
1922 High Relief
35,401
1926S
6,980,000
1922
51,737,000
1927
848,000
1922D
15,063,000
1927D
1,268,900
1922S
17,475,000
1927S
866,000
1923
30,800,000
1928
360,649
1923D
6,811,000
1928S
1,632,000
1923S
19,020,000
1934
954,057
1924
11,811,000
1934D
1,569,500
1924S
1,728,000
1934S
1,011,000
1925
10,198,000
1935
1,576,000
1925S
1,610,000
1935S
1,964,000
1926
1,939,000
 
 
The production was halted for 1929 and picked back up in 1934, that is why the gap in years.

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