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Insider Guide to Collecting Diecast Models

Updated on January 6, 2013

EVERYTHING (ALMOST) YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT DIECAST CARS

Ben Legacy Guide: Get an overview of the diecast collecting hobby. This guide is for you if you're just beginning to collect models OR you have a collection and want to make sure you have the fundamentals down. I also hope experienced collectors read this and suggest improvements.

What are major differences in scale model cars?

So you know what you're looking at

Scale: Models are made in a range of scales. The three most popular scales are (from lowest) 1:43 - 1:24 - 1:18. A 1:43 model means that every dimension of the model is reduced to 1/43 of the subject car. So if the subject car is 16 feet in real life, here is how long the models would be:

1:18 = 10 inches

1:24 = 8 inches

1:43 = 4.4 inches

In 1:18 scale, every 18 inches of the real car will be represented by 1 inch of a scale diecast car.

Method: The two leading manufacturing methods are diecast (the model is usually assembled from so many individually cast components) and resin-cast (the model is molded from synthetic resin). The larger scales have traditionally been dominated by diecast, but an increasing number of 1:18 issues are being resin-cast.

Resin-cast models can be very detailed and beautifully made and valuable. Their detail is on the exterior and what you can see through the windows. Such models do not open. Diecast models, on the other hand, typically feature opening doors, hoods and trunk. As a result, more of the car can be seen.

Even though "static," resin-cast models can be just as dramatic and valuable as a diecast. Two brands that make precision cast resin models as valued by savvy collectors as diecast models, are available on Legacy Motors: BBR Models and Automodello.

Why would one diecast model cost more than another - Which factors determine the value of a diecast model?

This exotic Alfa Romeo has been big hit with collectors.
This exotic Alfa Romeo has been big hit with collectors.

Rarity: How many were ever made of this model at this scale? The fewer number issued of a specific model raises its value. Lowering the value is that same model being issued in a range of colors or livery (racing decals). When models become rare over time, their value appreciates.

Detail: How closely does each component of the model resemble the subject car? Does the tooling of the model look like the real thing? Detail is usually a function of number of parts and also inventive choice of different "media" (i.e. not all diecast metal). Related to detail is accuracy. Accuracy refers to how faithfully the model reproduces the specifics of the subject car.

Operability: What opens to reveal more interior, like engine and interior, adds to the model's realism.

Stance & Finish: Great model engineering overcomes the limitations imposed by miniaturization of each component. There are fewer compromises made. A bolt looks fine on your Ford Taurus but imagine what it takes to make it realistic at less than 1/32 of an inch. You can most readily see this in the stance of the car - which means how it "sits" on a surface. Is the suspension unrealistically high or too low or just right. Finish refers to the quality of paint and decal applications.

Condition: You want a model to be "Mint in Box" - which means in the condition it was sold originally. If buying from a reputable retailer, this is what you would expect.

Scale: Size and heft impacts value; but of itself is secondary to other factors. Despite being a fraction of the size, a 1:43 scale model can cost much more than a 1:12 model if it is rare and more accurate.

How much should you expect to spend - Diecast models are a great gift for car buffs

Models worth every penny, but cost a pretty penny
Models worth every penny, but cost a pretty penny

For a collector-grade diecast model, this is what you can expect at each price range.

Top of the line: lots of perfectly crafted parts, excellent fit-lines (along doors, hoods, etc.), creative blend of materials. Built from small components more like the original car was. Click on Top of the Line to get an idea of what a diecast aficionado thinks is amazing.

Modestly priced: the same criteria as above, except with less finesse, fewer parts, no engineering marvels. Still can have WOW! factor. Excellent value for between $60 - $130.

Inexpensive: get a lot for a little, but the detail is less crisp, the paint is less likely to be spot-on and applied by automation. Still, you know in an instant that these are a lot more than toys.

Exquisite models can be made of cars and trucks that never cost much in the showroom! For example, a replica of a VW mini-bus - modestly priced in the sixties - can cost over $200 because of its detail and originality. Conversely, you can get a cheap model of a Ferrari.

What cars and trucks have been modeled in diecast? - Do they make a model of my favorite car?

Pagani Huayra - fewer people will own the real one than the model
Pagani Huayra - fewer people will own the real one than the model

The manufacturers make models in every category of vehicle you can think of. Click on Categories of Models. Browse cars from every era, every racing genre; trucks and working vehicles of every type; and motorcycles.

The makers choose subject cars based on what collectors have bought up in the past. This has nothing to do with a vehicle's actual sales volume in the real world. You will wait a long time to see a replica of the Toyota Camry or Honda Accord. On the other hand, you won't have to wait long at all to see a replica of an exotic Pagani supercar - that only maybe 200 multi-millionaires can afford.

The selection of which vehicles to model is based on costs including licensing and projections on how quickly they want to sell out. In the diecast hobby, most models are some form of limited edition.

Your suggestions are appreciated - Let's collaborate on what you and I know

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      The Art Of Collecting....Art

      A carefully and meticulously executed scale model with respect to detail and authenticity is a work of art in its own right. Carefully selecting and gathering a number of models, whether to tell a story of the evolution of a marque or simply to express one's passion for the automobile can become an art form in itself, if done with taste and measure - a definite challenge, given all the subject matter that is available!

      Integrating other media such as literature, film and artwork can enhance and enrich a collection and help tell a more complete story, particularly when a specific replica can be seen in action, a picture, or somehow described in the supporting media, adding a note of drama or excitement to the ensemble.

      A well-presented collection is the expression of a passion, as is a poem, a photograph, a painting or any other art form - and you can't put a price on passion...

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      RJP

      I read your articles. I think it is a great idea to encourage more young collectors. I myself have been collecting diecast for about fifteen years or more. I have about 150, "all" 1/24 scale, not too big, not too small. My corvette collection alone, between the FM & DM, i have from the 1953 to the 1972 consecutively, plus all of what they made in the 80's 90's & 2000s. I filled in the gaps with less detailed one's. One suggestion; word of mouth also does a lot of advertising. Good luck.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Really good overview of a changing hobby. As I switched from the 1/24 scale U.S. domestics to 1/18 resin and higher end diecasts, largely of Euro sports cars, I am encountering larger followings and reviews of these models in Europe and Asia.

      This kind of site is renewing my interest in the hobby! Bravo!

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Good overviews on the hobby of collecting. Hopefully, it will encourage others to take this hobby up so that they find the same rewards and satisfactions that so many have found, whether it be be collecting or even modifying die cast cars. myself, I've been collecting for some 40 years. Started with plastic model cars, then sold off most of my 3,000+ collection and migrated to die cast cars. There is no end in sight for me, as I can see myself enjoying this great hobby for quite some time yet.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Terriffic article. I started collecting in 1982 in Japan, now wish I had fewer moderately priced pieces and a few top of the line to display.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: That sums up my feelings perfectly!

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      Ben Legacy 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Thank you for sharing your scale model history. I hope you will participate and contribute on our Forum 18 in the Diecast Zone!

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      The very reason that it has become a somewhat difficult hobby is , in my opinion, is too many choices of models made available in so many price ranges. To often, a person has to choose a model of very minor quality, at mostly a fair price, over a much nicer quality product, that quite possibly most people cannot afford. $ 400.00 or more for a working person to buy a decent quality model is hard to understand.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      I read your primer - yes, that's what I'd call it. And I want to add my 2 cents to the equation. I have been collecting as an adult for more than 30 years, starting with 1:24th and eventually changing to 1:18th scale dieCast. I sold my 1:24th collection when I realized that 1:18th was so much more detailed and now I have about 234 pieces, the majority in 1:18th scale. As a child I built 1:25th scale models - all of them mostly stock and played with their suspension to make it work. As a retiree now I can not afford to keep buying as I once did, but I select my desires carefully. I mostly buy 1950-60-70 era American vehicles, though I have others as I saw them and liked something about them. My collection is half on display and half packed away just because I don't have room in the house for all of them. I occasionally rotate what is on display. I don't keep boxes for some lower-priced models, only the better quality ones. DieCast collecting is my main hobby and I try to write a short article about each real car that I have a model of.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Thanks for all your effort to support and encourage this hobby. Just like the plastic model kit hobby that almost died, the manufactures need to somehow encourage the younger generation to start collecting. Younger folk much care about the pre1970s automobiles

      We all have different goals in collecting. I started with the Franklin Mint cars of the 50's many years ago. These were somewhat crude by today's standards,but the body shapes and colors were were fairly accurate and captured an era of car design that had already disappeared. My collection of models is fairly large and includes all scales. I seldom turn the cars over to look at chassis detail or open the hoods trunks or Interiors. I have all my cars displayed in glass bookcases where I see their wonderful shapes and colors. I will never be able to resell them as "Mint-In-Box" or "Excellent" but rather as "greatly enjoyed" and "appreciated". I have already recovered my monetary investment many times over. P.S. I love the increasingly available/affordable 1/64th scale vehicles that may be classified as toys, but some are quite accurate and come in multiple original style color combinations. The truck selections are particularly fun.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Very well said. I do not want to lose that disease.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Good general overview.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      When these gems are properly made, they give us a free ride back to our childhoods, or other peak moments in our lives. Keep 'em coming!

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Great,article,I just love the diecast!!

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Very good overview!

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Not exactly true about both mints not producing 1:24 scale cars. I am expecting a brand new one on wednesday from Danbury, 1948 Chevy and I have seen one for sale on the diecast zone already.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Very informative article. More information is much better. DCCC is a great resource. I have been collecting 1/24 from FM, DM, WCPDC, CMC, GMP and others since the late 80's and believe I have a complete collection of "factory stock" models. I never did it to make a profit. I just did it as a lifetime car enthusiast. It is a shame that the manufacturers of 1/24 have all gone. Hopefully some will come back soon. I do like the Automondello 1/24 cars and have been collecting them also.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      diecast collecting is like a disease once bit thsts it

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Mr. Knab,

      Thank you for the primer. Recently there has been news of die cast factories in China being closed down for reasons unknown (maybe bankruptcy) and model tooling confiscated. This as I understand it has affected quite a few companies production including Danbury Mint and AutoArt, maybe others. Getting a postcard from a company saying that the model is no longer available, yet you know some quantity have been delivered, but not knowing why is disappointing and confusing at best. I have been collecting and modeling for 50 years, so my collection is sizable, i know the names of die cast suppliers, but not all of them.. It would be very worth while for collectors to know 1) The names of the better die cast companies, if they can be ranked according to price and quality and 2) A status on the companies health, that is, are they affected by the situation in China and possibly some information on the price increases (per year) by various die cast manufacturers. Has a die cast supplier gone out of business and is some other retail entity selling the remaining inventory. This would help the collector with respect to understanding why the model ordered a year ago has not been delivered and why. Thank you for you effort in educating the automotive die cast collector.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Very informative information, also a good read

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Very good article. I have a varied collection of die cast, 1-18 down to 1-64 of both 'toy' and mint models. I buy those models and years which appeal to me. Because of this article I may beginning looking at

      Resin-cast models.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Good article. Diecast models are always at the top of my wish list for birthdays, Christmas, etc. 1:24 scale is my favorite size.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Article was excellent. I have about 600 pieces in my collection,they are in all scales due to the fact that not all cars are available in all scales. I tend to buy models of cars I like, a not worry about the scale or the media.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Good basic primer.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      A really good article with excellent basic information. I think listing all the current manufacturers would be helpful. I have been building models since the late 50's and collecting die-cast for over 20 years and there is always something that I want. When family or friends ask me what I would like for Christmas I have always pointed them in this direction and let them choose.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Tony G, Torrance Ca. My interest in diecast cars started with Hot Wheels then later grew to both Danbury and Franklin Mints, I even have a full collection from West Coast Precision. It's been a great run, I say this because both the Mints and West Coast are no longer producing 1/24 scale diecast.

      I do have a few 1/18th scale diecast but because of lack of space I'm limited to how many 1/18th scale I can store. I love the art of diecast collecting, but with the Mints no longer producing 1/24th scale diecast,

      my interest in the art has somewhat lessened.

      What I would like to know, is there an official catalog out there where I can find out what my diecast are worth and who (organizations, etc.) can I contact to sell my diecast too?

      My Thanks to all the companies out there who made the "young boy" in me enjoy my hobby!

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      My experiences have proven that when choosing those models to collect for resale purposes choose quality over price.Cheap stuff will not hold any promise for a profit down the road!

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      mark l. from nevada i have been collecting 1:18 diecast muscle cars for over 15 years. i know the molds are expensive but i would like to see more models other than the olds ones continually being redone.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Great article for the neophyte as well as the experienced collector.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Ray....I agree with you...there needs to be a "collectors" blue book out there for us to see just how much we do have invested in our collections, and how much they have increased in value..which would also bring posssibly more interest to the hobby!

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      What a great primer for folks beginning to get interested in this avenue of motordom! You have succinctly stated the basics as well as a great overview of this wonderful hobby. Excellent, excellent job!

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Great way to stir up more interest in the hobby! I have been collecting for over 25 yrs..Started off with just bank trucks/cars, but also collect whatever "turns my crank" [ as long as it is diecast]. I have recently been collecting theme vehicles....hearses', TV/movie that sort of thing....the Charger from Bullit movie is now out..that sort of thing. What I am having a prob. with is finding a book to give me some kind of idea of value on these die casts. I have some that are older and run in a #'d series, and would like to know the value for ins. reasons if nothing else, but I can not find a good appraisal book anywhere. Are there any out there?

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Excellent article; I love corvettes and Danbury Mint models that I collect for some years. The main problem for me is import models in Italy; the cost of Customs has increased too. Diecast Zone helped me find the right models. Thanks to exist

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      ChuckG....Excellent article......All one needs to know in a concise, fully understandable presentation.....hopefully it will aid a lot more newbies to get involved in our collectible passion....

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      A GREAT & CONCISE WAY OF INTRODUCING THIS HOBBY TO A NEW OR INTERESTED COLLECTOR.iT IS VERY INFORMATIVE AND NOT NISLEADING AS FAR AS SWAYING A COLLECTOR TO BUY ONLY A CERTAIN SIZE OR MAKE OF PIECE.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      It's important to emphasize the [importance] of buying what you like in a collectible model - regardless of its rarity or price. At the end of the day that will make the difference in whether or not you enjoy and stay with the hobby over the long haul.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Once you "Spring" for one of the higher priced models, you will be hooked and you will be amazed at the detail!

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      My problem are the constant price increases of diecast and resin models. Pretty soon prices will be triple what they where in 1993 Actually minichamps is selling an f-1 1/43rd resin model for 100:00. So the day is here. With every price increase i'm forced to buy fewer and fewer models.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Good article...I've been collecting for over 20 years, with all different scales, quality levels, and prices. But I always like to read articles from others to learn new things or even get a validation of what I've learned...good stuff.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Excellent article / overview of the hobby. Anything new or additional to the hobby helps publicize it both for the benefit of current and new collectors. Thanks for your continuing support of this hobby.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Your article was great and very informative. I started collecting in 1958 with 2 models I got at Disney Land.I probably have acouple of thousand now. Mostly 1:43 scale but I bought from Danbery Mint and the other Mint one so I do have a lot of 1:25. I have a couple of larger ones but there in lyes the problem of SPACE. I think most people like to collect cars they can relate to. So replicas of cars that only millionairs own, don't appeal to me as much except for the Bugattis. I own real live MG's so I am always interested in those

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Great article. Has the info to know and understand scale. Diecast.org has a lot of info, auctions, news, new releases, blogs, etc. Each collector will likely tweak their collection to personal taste/likes. I am a 20 year collector of mostly street cars and trucks. A few drag racers along the way. One thing I have learned along the way, even in the 40's and 50's there were some beautiful colors available. Most enjoyable article.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      i have just started collecting and am loving it guys it gives me a great sense of fullfillment to buy top quality models and appreciate the craftemanship involved, i would though like to ask as i am from Australia where there is not a great demand for this type of ART what sites or distributors you may be able to recommend not just for the models but for premium packaging and service, cause there nothing worse then receiving brocken goods,thanks G

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Great article!! Much needed as an excellent overview of the hobby, including manufacturing methods and materials used today. Collecting model cars is also a great learning tool for kids interested in history, engineering, and car design.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Great article!! Much needed as an excellent overview of the hobby, including manufacturing methods and materials used today. Collecting model cars is also a great learning tool for kids interested in history, engineering, and car design.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Great article. I love collecting 1/18. I am almost 70 and still collecting.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      The power of a fine model is that it captures and possesses the living soul of the real thing!

      Looking at these model cars sitting on my shelf makes me think - what is it that I love about them? They serve no practical purpose yet they stimulate me, inspire me, I lust to discover every fine detail. While their engines will never roar or their tyres claw the tarmac, I feel the power in their purposeful design and the feline grace of their shape moving through the air at over 300 KPH. I sense the balance and poise of the pouncing chassis, even the look of the soft rubber tyres translates into wild agility. Then I pick one up and feel the smooth weight of the quality materials, the deep lustre of the paint, marvel at the finely crafted features and exacting attention to detail, then I open the bonnet and gasp at the minute engine detail â everything is there, nothing is left out.

      I think back to my first real cars and motorbikes. How I used to sit and look at the curves of the extractors, imagining the smooth flow of burning exhaust gases. The elegant way the spark plug cables run side by side before dividing to deliver their explosive moment of life. Now I relive those feelings with the most exotic racing cars on earth; Ferrari, Porsche, Jaguar. I can hold the naked aggression of a Formula 1 car in my hands or trace the aerodynamic curves of a Le Mans prototype with my fingers. That is the power of a fine model; it captures and possesses the living soul of the real thing!

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Good article. It´s a pity I could not buy from you due to problems with customs office.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Great blog. I have been collecting since the 70's, like mostly cars of the 30's and 40's. Was sorry that Danbury, and Franklin Mints dropped the die-cast cars. I felt there are so many "classic" cars they could have come out with. Again, thanks for sharing all of this information.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      A very effective survey of the hobby.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      I like shopping at legacy for the variety of model's made by different vendors. .I was lucky at times to purchase models no longer made but were available again through Legacy..I primarily like "Die Cast Metal" and I'm anxious to see how "resin cast" model's appear as to the car being modeled...I have been collecting die cast for 40 to 50 years or so and I recommend you go to the Legacy web site and go through their showroom of cars..Legacy is a very reputable site and have has a lot to offer..

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Informative article , I also collect 1/24 & 1/18 GMP Diecast cars 1966,1967 Ford Fairlane & 1970 Plymouth Road Runner & GTX are my prize models . This article will help me further better my collection.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Great article! How about another which documents some of the more valuable die cast releases for collectors? Sort of a "blue book" for us collectors!

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Great and relevant article. Not many people "get me" when it comes to collecting diecasts. I have over 600 since starting to collect in 1997. Since moving to a condo from a house, I have had to store most in a storage facility...which people "don't get"! Keep the articles coming.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Thanks to you folks I am in my 12th year of collecting diecast cars. I have around 300 now and rely heavily on your reviews and pictures to choose what I buy. This is a great informative post that everyone getting started in diecast collecting should read

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      I currently have over 500 1:18 scale cars (maybe, 600 but I lost count a long time ago). I started out buying the models at standard toy stores and occasionally will buy from a warehouse club if it's a make I like and one that I want to expand the chronologic period of my collection. However, over time, most of my purchases have been in the moderate range with a few up to $200 (I try to buy on sale if I can.)

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Nice! Thanks for sharing.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Good information! My collection of several hundred 1:43 models is based on American cars of the 1950s and earlier, but I am often attracted to others. The 1:43 scale is just right in my opinion for display, especially when accompanied by figures of similar scale. The variety available is great!

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Love every car u send me I appreciate every article and enjoy your e mail u always send me but sad at this time . Because u no longer have the evo x which I was going to buy if u could please get it for me I'll be more than grateful love this sit Thanks one more time

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      I only began collecting die-cast model cars in the last 5 or 6 years. It started with me trying to collect the cars that I drove since I was 16 years old. Suddenly it evolved into a collection of cars that I drove, wish I drove or hope to drive. :-) I have even begun giving die-cast model cars to friends to encourage collecting. So far it has worked.

      This article/blog is fantastic and very informative for the new collector -- me!

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Excellent blog

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Sure wish I had this kind of information when I started my collection. Great stuff.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Great article on scale models. My modest collection includes over 1200 models (and still growing). Although the majority of mine are 1:24 scale, I have models in scales 1:6 (engines), 1:12, 1:16, 1:18, 1:24, 1:32, 1:43, 1:50, 1:64, 1:87, As your article states, the 1:18 scale are easier to view, but typically have fewer details, and they present a problem of storage and display due to their larger size. My favorites are the 1:24 due to their excellent detail, working components, and slightly smaller size, but they too, will eventually cause a problem with display space (already there!). I have several 1:43 models, but they typically lack detail, few working components, and are often priced as high or higher than my beloved 1:24 scale. The two greatest advantages of 1:43 scale is the wide variety of available vehicles and the fact that they don't take up too much storage space. Great article - keep up the good work.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Hi and greets from Finland.

      Good and informative article. Not too short or too long.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      You hit the nail right on the head, Benny! Wonderfully written and informative. Thanks!

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      A concise guide for new and seasoned collectors.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Die cast collecting is an addictive hobby but full of rewards. This article is a great primer.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      I have a 35 car collection. Mostly 1950s car. My first real car was a 1953 Chevey and I have two models in my collection. With these models I have a chance to relive my teens and my love of the big chrome bumper cars.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Couldn't have written it better myself...

      Everything the newbie collector wanted to know about model car collecting, but was afraid to ask! :)

      I would add that - in model car collecting, it is a case of you get what you pay for - I have always found the more I've paid, the more satisfied I have been with the model in question - I settle for nothing less than accurate and great detail.

      Experience of model car collecting will tell you generally which are the best manufacturers, and with experience, learning which manufacturer produces a better and more realistic quality of car model than another rival manufacturer.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      This is a great time to start collecting: new models are becoming ever more impressive in their detail and many subjects are still appearing for the first time in metal or resin. There is a good back catalog of well-made stalwarts. A place like diecast.org is a great place to start, because you can learn on the forums, shop for new models at the Legacy motors online shop or keep a daily watch on the active auction pages.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Great information - especially like the scale comparison chart.

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      john-kuvakas 4 years ago

      Excellent and helpful information. Let me add this concerning 1/43 scale;

      It is the most popular scale on a world-wide basis with an astonishing number of models available in an incredibly diverse range of subjects. When the art of making an accurate miniature gets down to this size, fidelity becomes the primary focus. 1/43 shares the same diversity in pricing as the other scales but, as the price rises, you'll find fewer operating features, the reverse of the larger scales. Some 1/43 models will feature detailed engines or chassis but accurate-to-scale shut lines become an elusive challenge. Opening doors, hoods and trunks are not as highly regarded in 1/43 as they are in 1/24 and 1/18 models. The primary focus of the premium 1/43 collector will be fidelity and exclusivity.

      The higher end 1/43 models will typically boast astounding accuracy with most of these precious miniatures being hand made in very small quantities, sometimes in multiples of tens rather than thousands as we may see in some of the larger scales. With recent developments in manufacturing, assembly and casting technology, 1/43 is seeing a slow but steady increase in operating features but has experienced quantum leaps in accuracy.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Please come and visit us on any of the forums, they will grow on you. BTW, in 1:43rd scale there is a third manufacturing method called hand-built white metal. These are hefty, high quality, up-scale models that you would love to have. They start at around $120 and go on up but are pieces of art and well worth the price.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      This is good information to the novice collector. I might suggest a slight change in the title - "Insider Guide to Collecting Diecast and Resin-cast Models

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      I haven't given enough time to scrutinze it carefully but so far I think it's a good start. Will the site allow you to include a link back to Legacy? That way, if someone wants to buy a model, Legacy will be the first retailer they visit.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Visit us at www.diecast.org and stop by the Forums to say hello. The fun comes in ALL scales!

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Some well defined information and a rule of thumb to go by.