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How to make Money in the Lord of the Rings Online

Updated on February 20, 2013

Making Money in LOTRO in 2012

When it comes to Making Money in LOTRO in 2012, there are various ways to do that. Unlike other MMO games, the choice of profession that you would like, Lord of the Rings Online does not enable you to choose single professions.

However you choose a vocation that is certainly comprised of three professions. Because the professions are bundled into groups of three, each of them include a minumum of one gathering skill and a couple crafting professions that go hand-in-hand together.

These tips/help assists you to create a sort of dependence on all the vocations within the LOTR economy, requiring that players trade for stuff that they require for their vocations. Here's the breakdown of the different vocations which you can choose and which professions they include:

Overview LOTRO Professions
Overview LOTRO Professions

Overview LOTRO Professions

1.Armorer - includes: prospector, metalsmith, and tailor.

2.Armsman - includes: prospector, weaponsmith, and woodworker.

3.Explorer - includes: forester, prospector, and tailor

4.Historian - includes: farmer, scholar, and weaponsmith.

5.Tinker - includes: prospector, jeweller, and cook.

6.Woodsman - includes: forester, farmer, and woodworker.

7.Yeoman - includes: farmer, tailor, and cook.

Lord of the Rings Gold is a little bit different from other games that are known off. First off, there's the conversion rate:

First Thing in LOTRO!
First Thing in LOTRO!

First Thing in LOTRO!

Read this first

1 Gold in LotRO represents way more than it does in certain other games where gold is a base money. You can acquire a little home for not less than 1 gold.

In early stages in the game, quest rewards are calculated in Copper. Merchant rubbish from mobs may be worth a few copper every now and then. Eventually, quests reward silver, and vendor trash trophies are worth silver. Gold originates from vendoring plenty of trash and completing a lot of quests.

F2P accounts start off along with a currency limit of two gold. Any excess coin the gamer earns is stored by having an escrow broker, and also this coin can't be used, but this cap could be liftedby buying upgrading in the LotRO store. The currency cap upgrade increments the amount of gold a player can transport and use, and several such upgrades must be purchased if the player desires to carry huge amounts of coin.

You likely will never have to buy this upgrade for a time, but in the future in the game it'll be necessary.

Something to understand is always that coin is just one with the currencies utilized in the game. Gold and silver coins are utilized to buy mundane things - crafting ingredients, traveling from stable-masters, repairs, etc. - and additional skills. Exceptional things like raid armor and account upgrades are ordered by other means, like barter tokens, skirmish marks or Turbine Points.

Having a lot of coin is great, however, you will have to earn the other things also.

PLaying Low Levels - Treasure or Trash?
PLaying Low Levels - Treasure or Trash?

PLaying Low Levels - Treasure or Trash?

Selling Trash making Fortunes?

At lower levels, most coin will probably be earned by killing mobs, selling the junk they drop and delivering quests. There are, naturally, exceptions to this rule, but that is generally the case. Mobs drop junk, junk is worth money.

Weapon, armor and jewellery rewards from low-level quests in many cases are inferior to crafted items for a similar level range. Critted gear comes with a even longer shelf life, and if you're walking around in a full critted list of armor with critted weapons and jewelry, you can usually just pawn all of the reward items for quests.

When handing the quests in, try to find the one with the highest coin value and select that. If the reward is preferable to what you have, take it and use it instead, however it usually won't be.

Items with the dark purple background grey border are vendor trash/task trophies. Green background, green border are crafting items. The red-bordered stuff at the base row is crap I can't delete from my inventory.

The "trash" trophies, items using a dark purple background (see picture), are frequently turned in for tasks. This can be kind of a trade-off at low levels - you get XP and (sometimes) track record of completing tasks from bulletin boards, but no coin, and when you decide to sell these to a vendor instead for coin, you will get no XP or rep on their behalf.

If you are desperate for coin, avoid doing the duties and just sell the garbage loot. Really, gaining levels is pretty easy!

Then there's the crafting mats. Anything with a green background (see picture) is effective to someone even if you can't utilize it yourself. Never sell these items to vendors. Cut back piles of them and sell them to other players, most likely through the Trade chat channel or by posting auctions in the auction house.

Trade channel is available to everyone: type /trade and compose your message. Holding the CTRL key and right-clicking around the item will link it in chat, so you can show what you are selling. Earning profits by using the Trade channel will involve a bit of market-savvy, knowing what those things you are offering are worth.

You can determine the worth of items by inspecting similar sales inside auction house and working out a rough average per-item price. If you are being not sure of a decent selling price, say "PST with offer" and keep your fingers crossed.

How to Play the Market with Auction House - Good money....

How to Play the Market with Auction House
How to Play the Market with Auction House

The auction house is quite easy to use for simple things, but there are many subtleties that more advanced players are able to use to their advantage.

F2P players will likely need to buy the ability to use the auction house through the LotRO Store. If you're in this game for the long haul, this is definitely something to consider, as you can use the ah to make absurd numbers of money. But it is probably something you will need to hold off on until later amongst people, after you have purchased other necessities like currency cap upgrades, inventory space, virtue slots and quest packs.

Posting a sale is simple enough. Open the auction house panel at the auctioneer, choose the Post tab, drag the item you wish to sell, set the purchase price and the duration, hit Post Auction. There are some different options for this process, that is the basics. When you post an auction, you are charged a little fee for the posting, the amont based on the duration of the posting. When the auction sells, the auction house claims 10% of the final bid to get a "delivery fee" and the money is shipped to your mailbox.

Prior to deciding to post, though, you will want to know what your item is selling for currently. To ascertain this, you'll want to try to find other auctions of the item. Drag your item for the search box striking the Search button, and you may see all the other entries for your item. You can examine these auctions, determine a mean average price for your amount you are selling and figure out whether or not that amount is suitable.

When you post antique dealer, there are 2 fields for that asking price: Initial Price and Buyout Price. The original Price is the lowest amount you are going to accept for the item, and interested buyers will increment this price with every consecutive bid. You will want to set the initial price at at least the vendor value, as well as the posting fee, plus 10 - 15% to pay for the "delivery fee". If you the choice is yours lower than this amount, your family will enjoy more money by just pawning the item to vendors, therefore the auction is a net loss. For particularly desirable items, you can set the initial price greater. Setting the initial price low can cause bidding wars, that may be kind of fun to look at. People will literally wait through the auctioneer, monitoring their auctions, all night, countering bids as they happen. For many auctions, there will be no apparent interest prior to the last few hours, after which there may be a bidding war.

The Buyout field is optional, but you can sometimes stand to make more money quicker by setting a top Buyout price because many people (like me) are impatient and don't want to bother with a bidding war or hold off until the auction ends to win (or lose) the bid. The Buyout option lets people to buy the item right away. For the Buyout field, set the best price you think you are able to reasonably get for your the item according to market place value. Generally, this really is 5 - 10% lower than the lowest current buyout of the identical item, but you will find exceptions.

For big ah profits, timing is crucial. Big-ticket, sure-sale items can be posted for shorter durations (which cuts down on posting cost). For other things, keeping the auction alive for may be necessary to ensure sale, and you'll want to wait until the weekend to publish them. Weekends typically see more players online, which means more people looking for particular items than you might see on, say, a Wednesday morning. When more players are purchasing, prices can be set higher. Weekend = a lot of money.

Smart auctioneers can play the market industry like a Middle-Earth broker. Once you learn what items typically cost, you can watch for bargain-priced auctions, snap them up (or buying them and keep your buying track with the Bids tab) and repost them at a markup. For example, if someone posts several stacks of black dye for less than 100 silver a stack buyout, you should buy them up and repost them for 200 silver, selling in smaller quantities over an extended period of time so you don't flood the market industry and encourage undercutting. This course requires a good deal of patience and market-savvy, and it is more of a long-term thing when compared to a way to make quick-and-easy cash, but shrewd players can make it pay off.

What about Skirmishes, Instances & Deeding - Oh yeah...

By the time you get to level cap, earning profits becomes much, easier.

Skirmishes make OK money from your bounties that occasionally drop from lieutenants. You'll not get rich running skirmishes, but you will usually make enough from vendoring the bounties to pay for your repairs and several extra. Plus you will end up getting loads of skirmish marks, which can be traded for items which sell well on the auction house. The Symbol of Celebrimbor currently will cost you around 20 gold, and that can be earned per day by running 5 instances. If you're lucky, you'll get more than 1.

Instances are apt to have a bigger payout than skirmishes, because mobs in instances drop coin along with other loot. A full-clear of Grand Stairs can enable you to get around 2 gold just from that. You may also auction the relics from boss chests. Managing a lot of endgame group content will typically earn you a lot of money.

Occasionally, men and women organize "gold runs" on later-game raids. The best will set a price for specific loot pieces, and anyone who wants that specific piece pays in the pot to be guaranteed that loot. At the conclusion of the raid, all the money is divided among the participants. This sort of run carries its very own risks, but if you might be raid-ready, hurting for coin and willing to risk wasting a few hours with a bunch of clueless noobs, go nuts.

Deed grinding is an additional way to earn decent coin. Humanoid mobs usually drop coin and other loot, and beasts etc drop loads and lots of vendor trash. Killing a huge selection of worms in Angmar means numerous scales, skins, eyes and whoever else - these all add together. Obviously, this is not a get-rich-quick scheme, but it's profitable over time.

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    • ImmatureEntrepr profile image

      ImmatureEntrepr 5 years ago

      Really well crafted lens! Love the topic too. Squid Angel blessed!