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5 Things My Dentist Didn't Tell Me

Updated on April 26, 2016

Don't Be Afraid to Ask Your Dentist Questions

I've been going to the same dentist for me than 8 years. While we're very friendly and share small talk about my husband and kid, he's never gone into any great explanations about things I could be doing for better health care.

We discuss my general care, like how healthy my gums are and if I am getting all the benefits of my spin rotating toothbrush.

While my dentist is an expert at helping me to maintain my oral health, shouldn't he also offer practical advise as well?

What about dental concerns that are not related to my current visit. At this point you may be wondering what types of concerns should my well visited and well respected dentist be addressing?

1. Oral Cancers

Since you are looking directly into my mouth, do you notice anything unusual about my tongue? Does the rare occasions when my gums bleed mean something significant that I should be concerned about?

Have you checked me for oral cancer? What are the symptoms that are tell-tale signs that I should be mindful of between dental visits?

2. Daily Brushing and Flossing

Sometimes I forget to brush and floss more than once per day. Is it really necessary? We've all be trained in early childhood to brush and floss in the morning when we rise and just before bedtime each night. Actually, one really good and thorough flossing and brushing each day is enough to keep plaque away.

Plaque can take up to 24 hours to grow back in any significant quantity to really cause a problem, according to Dr. Edward Roman a leader in cosmetic dentistry in Morristown, New Jersey.

Most dentist don't bother to mention this to patients because the average person spends less than 30 seconds brushing their teeth and most don't even floss. So suggesting brushing and flossing less than twice per day may just be a mute point.

3. Sugary Drinks is Only the Beginning

It's true that nearly all dentist discourage their patients from drinking sugary drinks, which often leads us, patients to think that the sugar is the actual culprit. Interestingly enough even diet sodas, which is considered to be "sugar free" can be an issue for teeth.

Why you may ask? Phosphoric acid. Many carbonate drinks contain phosphoric acid, which over time can be quite problematic for teeth and can even disintegrate teeth.

Dentist often use a form of phosphoric acid to etch enamel on the teeth, so that they can bond them. So, if you can manage a day without a sugary carbonated drink, go with root beer or a cream soda that are made without phosphoric acid.

4. Makeover Madness

Not everyone needs a Hollywood smile. There's no need to finance a smile but, I'll take your money anyway. Most patients may need just a little alignment and bleaching. Invisible braces are a comfortable alternative for many people and a little home bleaching can go a long way to achieving a beautiful smile. Another tip? A summer tan and a lipstick that is a few shades darker than your own lips can make your smile look a few shades lighter, without actually doing anything at all to your teeth.

5. Choose a More Friendly Toothpaste

When was the last time your dentist asked you what kind of toothpaste you were using? Toothpastes with Flouride and Sodium Laurel Sulphate can wear down the enamel on your teeth over time. Opt for a more organic option if at all possible. You're actually getting plenty of Flouride in the course of your day, without even realizing it. You simple don't need the additional chemicals in your mouth.


Did You Know?

  • Sleeping on your side actually helps your nighttime breathing. Sleeping on your stomach can affect the muscles in your head, neck and jaw. It may even be the cause of waking up with a morning headache.
  • European Dental care is highly comparable to that of dentist in the United States. If a travel dental emergency arises contact the American Dental Society of Europe or ADSE for a list of members in your area.
  • Oral Wipes are available for nearly every member of your family including babies and pets. Carrying oral wipes is convenient and usually TSA friendly if you and your toothbrush become unexpectedly separated.
  • Kissing is safer than shaking hands. It's true that 80 million bacteria are passed during a passionate 10 second kiss but, you're much more likely to get sick by shaking hands throughout the day than by kissing. Not everyone washes their hands - besides you are much more likely to be more selective in who you kiss.

Easy Oral Care on the Go!

Clean Teeth Anytime or Anywhere

Speak Eazy Mouth Wipes Clean Teeth and Tongue Anytime or Anywhere and Taste Great Too!

Travel Well Poll

Do You Buy a New Toothbrush When You Travel

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You Can't Handle the Tooth

Tell the Tooth

You can't see them or feel them, but your mouth is home to entire colonies of microorganisms. While most of these tiny bacteria do you know harm, there are more than a few that do.

Streptococcus mutano (or Strep) is a bacteria that you've probably heard the most about. It lives in your mouth and feeds on the sugars and starches that you eat. That in and of itself wouldn't really be that bad, except for your ravenous appetite. This combination can produce enamel eroding acids that make streptococcus the main cause of tooth decay.

The good news is that you can manage and control the bacteria in your mouth with good oral care. Brushing after a meal or using an oral care wipe can help to keep bacteria at a minimum in your mouth.

That along with an antibacterial mouthwash and a sensible diet can keep your oral flora from taking over and causing dismay.

Healthy Travel Tips

When traveling for short or long distances, it's a great idea to carry a mini-dental kit with in your hand held luggage.

If your luggage is lost or delayed, you're not likely to borrow someone else's toothbrush. You may have to buy a new toothbrush on the run, which is not entirely bad.

One great alternative is to build a mini-oral care kit. Toothpaste, Mouth wipes. Mouthwash and a travel toothbrush that fits into a backpack or carry on.

Take Your Vitamins

In recommended doses, immune-boosting complex vitamin formulations can help to counter stress,

which is known to lower your resistance to common ailments. And these days, we all know how
stressful travel can be, especially with long lines at security checkpoints, grumpy TSA officials,
and departure delays.

T+L Recommends: Berocca and Airborne are popular effervescent tablets ideal for
packing in a carry-on. The Mayo Clinic also offers useful information on the efficacy of supplements and herbal remedies, as well as healthy lifestyle tips
about nutrition and stress management.

Get Prescriptions in Order

Bring prescription medications in your carry-on luggage, as well as copies of all prescriptions,

including generic names for the same. Pack a note from your prescribing physician regarding
controlled and intravenous substances. Check with the Department of State or American Embassy to ensure that your medication is permitted into the country you’ll be visiting. For travel in remote areas where health clinics are questionable or few and far between, consider asking your doctor for sterilized syringes as well.



Get The Travel Facts

  • Be Prepare for the Unexpected
  • Take Your Vitamins
  • Get Your Prescriptions in Order
  • Be a Clean Freak
  • Drink Plenty of Fluids

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