ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

5 Types of Creepy Crawlies and Why You Attract Them

Updated on July 30, 2019
drfreddabranyon profile image

Fredda Branyon has dedicated her life to the advancement of complementary medicine.

Source

Here's a spine-tingling fact: About 91,000 described species of insects are living and breathing in the United States. To make matters more hair-raising, an additional 73,000 undescribed pests are crawling in our motherland. Yikes.

Everyone's worst nightmare would come true if all 164,000 species of creepy crawlies found a way to invade our homes. Luckily, that is not the case, and only a few are persistent.

Below are five common household bugs that, no matter how unwelcomed, still make their way through our doors, windows, and any space they can fit it.


1. Mosquitoes

If vampires turned into bugs instead of bats, they would be mosquitoes. When these blood-sucking insects are inside your home, the chances are that you have stagnant water somewhere, which female mosquitoes use to lay about 300 eggs. Yep — 300.


Puddles and leaks, house plants, and even an unused toilet are common breeding grounds for mosquitoes. To prevent them from trespassing and multiplying in your home:

Mosquitoes top this list because they carry life-threatening diseases, including dengue fever, West Nile fever, Zika infection, malaria, and many more.


2. Flies

With flies gorging on animal carcasses, garbage, fecal waste, and several other things that disgust us — there is no explanation needed as to why they carry diseases. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), flies transmit at least 65 diseases, including skin infections, eye irritants, and diarrhoeal disorders.


If flies are swarming around your property, it is likely because you have decaying organic filth lying around, including rotting meat and animal feces. The best course of action is to get rid of the source. If they remain swarming, set a fly trap.


3. Cockroaches

Let's be honest. The sight of a roach is enough to make a full-grown man scream like a child. When roaches overrun homes, it is because they seek out warmth, darkness, and moisture. To these tenacious creepy crawlies, leftovers on the kitchen counter are just a delicious bonus.


Try the following to get rid of roaches in your home:

  • Clean, clean, and clean more

  • Put your leftovers inside the fridge

  • Avoid leaving undone dishes in the sink overnight

  • Seal any cracks and holes in your walls or floors

  • Repair all leaks because roaches thrive on water

  • Keep the temperature in your house as cool as possible

  • Kill it with kindness, or kill it with roach-killer sprays

  • If you suspect an infestation, bring in the experts


4. Bedbugs

Sleep tight, don't let the bedbugs bite! Warmth, blood, and carbon dioxide attract the tiny insects our parents warned us about as children. However, a cluttered space provides them with more hiding spots.


To eliminate bedbugs from your household:

  • Wash your clothing, bedding, linens, carpets, curtains, and other fabrics in hot water. Then, use the highest dryer setting to dry them

  • Vacuum your mattress, as well as the above household items and surrounding areas regularly

  • Call your local exterminator or pest busters


5. Spiders

The American Psychiatric Association states that phobias affect over 1 in 10 people in the United States, and of those men and women, up to 40 percent of phobias concern bugs, including the eight-legged, fangs-equipped, ever-dreaded spider. So, how do you ensure that one never steps foot in your home?

The truth is, spiders are attracted to every insect on this list. Mosquitoes, flies, roaches, and bedbugs — the itsy bitsy spider went up the water spout to eat them. To make your home spider-free, make sure none of its favorite meals live there, too.

© 2019 Fredda Branyon

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment
    • Larry Slawson profile image

      Larry Slawson 

      10 months ago from North Carolina

      Really interesting article. Thank you for sharing!

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://maven.io/company/pages/privacy

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
    ClickscoThis is a data management platform studying reader behavior (Privacy Policy)