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Becoming Type 1 Diabetic

Updated on January 11, 2018

My personal story and warning signs of diabetes. Diabetes is something I never imagined having to battle at any point in my life. September 13, 2016 changed my

When I was pregnant with our son, three years ago, I did the normal gestational diabetes test with that orange drink and sat around for an hour. It was determined I had gestational diabetes, which meant a higher chance of becoming Type 2 Diabetic if I did not get control over my situation. I was not placed on medication, but was required to control with diet, exercise, and checking my blood sugar. April 2015, when I was admitted to the hospital to have our son, they didn't understand why my sugars were so good and my doctor decided to stop the every two hour check. I was told I had nothing to worry about, but just over a year later a shock hit me and it's nothing we ever expected.

I went through a period where I...

  • had excessive thirst
  • went to the bathroom a lot
  • fatigue at an all time high (driving was a scary task)
  • my vision was blurry
  • got my first yeast infection
  • lost over 10 lbs in a week

The first time I went to the urgent care just down the road from me we both thought of it as an oversight for the infection and she gave me a prescription and sent me on my way. The following week I went to the eye doctor and we thought we found a prescription that worked well for me. After that appointment I decided to go back to urgent care because that yeast infection didn't go away as expected. The doctor I saw that day asked "Would you mind if I just check your blood sugar level? The signs you have given me, and the infection not going away lead me to believe you have high blood sugar." I gave the consent and my life quickly changed within a matter of hours. My finger prick came back at 600+ and they had to run a lab. After about 30-45 minutes of waiting for lab results the doctor came back in the room and said "Your blood glucose is 877. You are going to have to go the hospital and be admitted to get this under control, I have already called them to tell them you are going to be on the way. Do you need an ambulance or will someone be taking you?"

So, here I am, getting taken to the hospital by my mother-in-laws other half, my mother-in-law is taking my child for an overnight 25 miles away, and my husband is at his National Guard drill 45 miles away. I'm just terrified to find out what's next in life. How long will I be in the hospital? We have plans in four days to leave town, I can't be in the hospital that long! Is Aidan going to do okay for his FIRST overnight stay away from us? Millions of thoughts going through my mind.

I get to the hospital and get checked into the ER, make it through triage check and finally get called back to a room (more like three walls and a curtain). More labs were taken, they needed to determine my A1C. I went through 3 hospital rooms before they decided where they needed me to be. My poor husband comes straight from his drill, in uniform and sleeps in a chair next to me overnight the first night. While admitted they talked to me about the importance of carb counting and daily activity to help my sugars, as days near in and my sugars begin to drop they start showing me how to use the insulin pens I will be prescribed, how to use them properly, how to dispose of the needles, the carb to unit ratio I was put on.

Three days came and went before I got my A1C results back. The percentage was so high that our local labs could not process it and my blood was sent for evaluation at the Mayo Clinic, 11.9% is what it came back at. The A1C goal per the American Diabetes Association for an adult is 7%, but is also based on numerous other factors so everyone's specific goal may be different. I encourage if you or anyone you know, experiences these type of systems to have them checked immediately.

To read more about symptoms of diabetes, how to control diabetes, or to donate to diabetes research visit the American Diabetes Association website. One day, hopefully we can find a cure.

If you'd like to look into the Dario blood glucose meter I have pictured you can visit their website. I was very skeptical when I got mine, now I can't imagine being without it. I keep mine in a bag in my purse with my Novolog pen and the additional items I need. If I switch bags everything is together and never left behind. I love the compact design of the Dario and the fact that it plugs right into my phone to do the readings. I never have to remember to log another number again as long as I have this.

My daily life.  Lantus for long lasting insulin support. Novolog for fast acting insulin support.  Dario glucose meter, it plugs right into my phone and keeps my numbers logged and safe.
My daily life. Lantus for long lasting insulin support. Novolog for fast acting insulin support. Dario glucose meter, it plugs right into my phone and keeps my numbers logged and safe.
A snip-it of my Dario logbook.
A snip-it of my Dario logbook.

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