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Being Misunderstood and Mental Illness

Updated on February 26, 2016

Being Misunderstood and Mental Ilness

Being Misunderstood and Mental Illness

By Monica Ortega

Being misunderstood can be so debilitating regardless of who you are. Having a mental illness can have an even more debilitating crucial affect. There can be so much bias towards a person with a mental illness that it can make it very hard to live those feelings down of being some type of freak or outcast. A person can be highly misunderstood within a family because most times families can mistake the affected person as having an attitude problem, being rebellious, or even doing drugs (Not all cases). When in reality the individual may most likely have an undiagnosed mental illness.

A person with a mental illness may very possible have noticeable characteristics such as: shame, depression, being withdrawn, always wanting to be alone and left alone, always feeling inferior and major trust issue’s with anyone regarding any personal information about themselves. Maybe, even having frequent physical routines or unhealthy behavior’s to pacify themselves, this is done to hide. Many times it is hard to face the realities of the hurt, pain, and fear they are experiencing, because of past or even present physical, mental, or verbal abuse causing such traumatic characteristics. Depending on the experience of the individual and time frame, they can start showing characteristics of a mental or a temporary emotional illness at any unfortunate time in life. Sadly enough, without professional help the individual can get progressively worse. Sad to say, but many undiagnosed individuals end up in prison for crimes committed, drug abuse, or suicide.

Individuals with these illnesses are highly mistreated and misunderstood. See, a person with a mental illness feels the same everyday feelings as anybody else. Differences are, is that a person with a mental illness just feels those same feelings in an even deeper, more amplified intense way, everyday… For example, a person that has those same everyday feelings or maybe not at all, but on a scale of one-to-ten they would feel a one. On the other hand, a person with a mental illness would feel those everyday feelings on the same scale of an amplified ten.

In general, feeling misunderstood can be harsh for anyone and can cause temporary emotional and mental disruptions in one’s life. As far as an individual with a mental illness, the feelings of being misunderstood can be very discouraging causing internalized life-long lasting disruptions in life. In conclusion, this article is of my own opinion and personal experiences leading me to share my thought’s in order to help and encourage anyone who would find my articles helpful, for yourself or a loved one.

“Life is meant to be lived, life is meant to be enjoyed, life is meant to be shared with each other, regardless of race, religion, culture and, or educational and employment status. Life can never be learned or have these qualities, until understanding can be accomplished”

(Quoted by Monica Ortega)

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  • monicaortegamon profile image
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    monicaortegamon 4 years ago from Ontario, california

    gsidley, thanks for clarifying I appreciate it, Monica, Sorry if I sounded crude in any way I just wanted to make sure I was hearing what I was reading correctly, :)

  • gsidley profile image

    Dr. Gary L. Sidley 4 years ago from Lancashire, England

    Hi Monica

    Just to clarify ...

    The point I was highlighting was the same one you made in your hub i.e.

    "See, a person with a mental illness feels the same everyday feelings as anybody else. Differences are, is that a person with a mental illness just feels those same feelings in an even deeper, more amplified intense way, everyday"

    There is a growing body of opinion (on both sides of the pond!) that what people with mental illness suffer is an extreme version of what everyone experiences from time to time. There is no clear dividing line between the mentally ill and the rest, it's just a question of degree. This continuum approach to mental health problems has a lot of evidence to support it and also has two major advantages:

    1. it is much less stigmatising

    2. it means that the range of strategies that benefit us all (e.g. exercise to improve mood, respectful relationships with other human beings to improve well-being, meditation to help us relax) are equally applicable to those suffering mental illnesses.

    I hope this provides the clarification you were seeking.

    Best wishes

  • monicaortegamon profile image
    Author

    monicaortegamon 4 years ago from Ontario, california

    Hey gsidley, how are you? Wasn't quite sure where you were going with your comment that's no lie...but can you please elaborate a little more clearly for me please and for others? As a westerner I'd really like to hear more about your theories being from the UK and all...Very interested. I agree with the echo of persons who lie on a continuum everybody does, but am not understanding where your comment fits or has anything to do with being mentally ill?

  • monicaortegamon profile image
    Author

    monicaortegamon 4 years ago from Ontario, california

    Hi Insanity Inc, I think that it is sad that someone else would evade your privacy about your illness, but if you really think about it the bias and stigma actually might have started with the person who revealed this information in the first place. I have come to realize that I don't care anymore...At first it was hurtful but now I welcome it and I really put myself out there. There's no hiding. Until people become more and more aware and can understand from a freak, lol like me I'm gonna continue to fight against this bias. It amazes me to see how we are looked at people with apparent mind illnesses, yet we have to deal with people who have small mind illnesses, go figure! Seriously though keep your head up and try not to let it bother you we live in a world with many misunderstandings, unfortunately...At least we are given the freedom to speak our minds, the thing is who's mind speaks louder...Hear what I'm saying? Thanks for sharing, Monica and keep writing.

  • Insanity Inc profile image

    Insanity Inc 4 years ago from Vermont, USA

    The most difficult experiences for me has been when someone I just met appears frightened of me. Why? Because someone else told them I have bipolar disorder. Despite the fact that I make every effort to maintain my privacy, Little Town USA talks. Thanks for this airing of society's dirty laundry!

  • gsidley profile image

    Dr. Gary L. Sidley 4 years ago from Lancashire, England

    Hi Monica

    I think you make some good points. In particular I'd like to echo that each of us lies on a continuum (of mood, arousal, unusual experiences etc.) and those with "mental illness" are just at a more extreme end of the scale, and are not qualitatively different from other people.

  • monicaortegamon profile image
    Author

    monicaortegamon 4 years ago from Ontario, california

    My goal is helping others n am very interested in reading you articles thanks Monica.

  • monicaortegamon profile image
    Author

    monicaortegamon 4 years ago from Ontario, california

    Hi Linda I'm totally open with you using any of my articles.

  • cherriquinn profile image

    cherriquinn 4 years ago from UK. England. Newcastle upon Tyne

    Hi there

    I would like to share your article on my facebook page 'fragile minds'. Would this be ok?. You may want to read some of my own experiences too. Best wishes.

    Linda

  • monicaortegamon profile image
    Author

    monicaortegamon 5 years ago from Ontario, california

    I am interested in reading your hub regarding your thought's you have mentioned. What is the title of your article? Thank you for comment because your right when you say it is a vicious cycle...Monica

  • meloncauli profile image

    meloncauli 5 years ago from UK

    Thanks for sharing your thoughts on this subject. It is somewhat of a vicious cycle isn't it? People with mental illness are not totally accepted socially and many tend to hide away. Isolation has a detrimental effect on anyone but if you already have a mental illness it can exacerbate the condition. I have mentioned this in one of my hubs.

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