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Chinese Medicine For Unusual Chronic Pain

Updated on March 6, 2016
Patty Inglish, MS profile image

Ms. Inglish offers 25+ years successful experience in medicine, psychology, STEM courses, and aerospace education (CAP).

Part of a Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) market.
Part of a Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) market.

Headaches of Many Kinds

Although I have had a few small headaches in my lifetime, I remember only two of these pains vividly: the horrid headache of a high fever as a child and the first migraine I experienced after inhaling secondhand marijuana smoke for 12 hours at work in food service at a university rock concert. The second event was accompanied by additional, bizarre symptoms. Chinese Medicine can help some of these bad experiences becomes less painful.

Source

Unusual Symptoms

Symptoms of my first migraine included the more usual symptoms of pain in the back of the neck that radiated up the back of the head and into the eyes, sensitivity to light, dizziness, and nausea, but also several hours of vomiting (more than usual) and extremely cold hands.

Migraine can also include visual obstructions – like seeing a herringbone pattern in the air – cognitive impairment, blurred vision, and other symptoms. I didn’t experience those symptoms, but suffered an inability to walk, difficulty in maintaining consciousness, and a a salt craving. In another migraine a few years later, I remember one aspect - tunnel vision in which the tunnel was becoming smaller in diameter.

Migraine suffers may also experience an aura before the onset of pain and other symptoms and I experienced this a few times -- My head felt as if it were enclosed in a large space helmet filled with angel hair (fiberglass Christmas decoration) through which electricity and an odd far-off gong sound were passing. I found that TCM can help alleviate all sorts of unusual symptoms.

During the initial migraine, it was a period of two hours spent away from the marijuana smoke in a different part of the building before I could drive home. Today, if I smell marijuana smoke, I vomit. At any rate, migraines are to be avoided. I found that certain aspects of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) alleviate, reduce, and prevent not only migraine pain, but also the aura, the visual symptoms or hallucinations, and cold hands.

Acupuncture and Migraine in the News

Herbs, Massage, Acupuncture, and Energy Exercises

We know that for millennia, 1) acupuncture and 2) Chinese herbal preparations have relieved many types of headaches and their root causes. They also eliminate additional symptoms attaching to the chronic pain.

The body of related research literature around the world has shown that TCM has most often been used for cases of chronic pain other than headache, but has also proven effective in eliminating chronic headaches and even migraine.

Acupuncturists often advise that for the maximum effectiveness, acupuncture treatments are combined with

  • Chinese herbs,
  • Specific massage techniques, and
  • Specific energy exercises from TCM.

The use of Chinese herbs for migraine and chronic headaches of other types is complex and specific and is listed EIGHT divisions described in the second half of the page at Traditional Chinese Medicine Information Page.The herbs administered and shown effective are specific to each one of the divisions.

Example of acupuncture.
Example of acupuncture. | Source

In addition, the extensive text at the link above indicates that acupuncture works for migraine and and other headaches by changing levels of chemicals in the body: serotonin, endorphins, acetylcholinesterase, serum (blood level) magnesium, and endogenous (produced by the body) opioids. Controlled studies bear witness to some of these affects.

My personal experience with TCM is that migraine was completely eliminated by a combination of adequate hydration with teas and water, massage, relaxation techniques, and exercises.

Relaxation and Breathing Techniques

Replicated Research Evidence

One controlled study in 2004 that is compelling is found in the British Medical Journal. It looked at a total of 401 adults. They were 18 to 65 years old and all experienced chronic headaches at a rate of at least 2 per month.

These adults were assorted randomly into two study groups. Group 1 received standard Western (allopathic) care along with 12 sessions of acupuncture. Group 2 received only the allopathic care. Acupuncture was the only difference between the groups.

Both groups were followed for one year of time. At the end of that year, results showed that the adults that received acupuncture suffered 22 fewer headache days, used 15% less headache medicine, completed 25% fewer physician’s visits, and lost 15% fewer sick days from work than the adults that had no acupuncture. There were significant findings. TCM (specifically, acupuncture)

  • Produced a reduction in chronic headache pain,
  • Saved healthcare costs, and
  • Saved lost time from the job, to the employers’ delight.

Additional References and Evidence

  • Acute and chronic effects of acupuncture on radial artery: A randomized double blind study in migraine Artery Research. Université Paris-Descartes, Paris, France. February 19, 2010. Researchers: Pierre Boutouyrie, Robert Corvisier, Kim-Than Ong, Claire Vulser, Catherine Lassalle, Michel Azizi, Brigitte Laloux, and Stéphane Lauren

-- Acupuncture migration changes the circulation via vasodilatation (widening blood vessels) in the radial artery in patients new to acupuncture; “chronic treatment” maintained the vasodilatation (and migraine symptoms lessened).

Acupuncture for the Management of Chronic Headache: A Systematic Review. Anesthesia and Analgesia. 2008; 107:2038-2047. Researchers: Yanxia Sun, MD, and Tong J. Gan, MB, FRCA.

-- Positive results found overall from an examination of 31 separate studies

  • Acupuncture for chronic headache in primary care: large, pragmatic, randomised trial. British Medical Journal; 2004;328:744. March 15, 2004. Researchers: Andrew J Vickers, Rebecca W Rees, Catherine E Zollman, Rob McCarney, Claire M Smith, Nadia Ellis, Peter Fisher, Robbert Van Haselen.

--"Conclusions: Acupuncture leads to persisting, clinically relevant benefits for primary care patients with chronic headache, particularly migraine. Expansion of NHS acupuncture services should be considered."

  • Acupuncture versus medical treatment for migraine and muscle tension headaches. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry 1984;47:333-337. Researchers: L Loh, PW Nathan, GD Schott, KJ Zilkha.

Clinical Experience

In a decade of work with pain and stress management programs among Workers’ Compensation and Social Security Disability chronic pain clients, I found additional elements from and related to TCM that can also help migraine and chronic headache sufferers–

Migraine sufferers often experience cold hands. Relazation and biofeedback techniques can warm the hands, but in patients for which this method is not effective, wearing gloves often both warms the hands and lessens migraine pain as well as lessening the more unusal symptoms. This has to do with circulatory changes that accompany migraine pain; warming the hands reverses them.

Stress can exacerbate migraine symptoms and increase their occurrence. TCM stress relief techniques, energy exercises, herbal preparations, and massage can reduce and eliminate stress that exacerbates these symptoms.

© 2010 Patty Inglish

Comments and Experiences

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    • Tracy Ann profile image

      Tracy Ann 7 years ago from Washington

      What a great hub. I am truly impressed! I used to suffer from chronic pain and i still have migraines. I will have to look into some of these treatments. Thanks!!

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
      Author

      Patty Inglish 7 years ago from North America

      Internetwriter62 - I imagine there are greater numbers than we know who are allergic to marijauana. That makes it difficult if they could use medical marijuana for other conditions, but are allergic doesn't it? It may be an embarrassment to say one is allergic to it some places as well. I'll look at Headache Take Care and see what's in it.

      LLRobbins - Herbs might work. For some women, though, the migraines go away after menopause begins or ends. Let me know if the herbs help.

    • LRobbins profile image

      LRobbins 7 years ago from Germany

      I get really bad migraines and didn't have any luck with accupuncture, although I know it works well for a lot of people, but I never thought of trying herbs or other TCM techniques. Thanks for the info.

    • Internetwriter62 profile image

      Internetwriter62 7 years ago from Marco Island, Florida

      Hi Patty,

      The beginning of your hub where you talk about getting a headache as a result of second hand marijuana smoke at a rock concert reminds me of a time I went to a Who concert with some friends when I was just twenty and there were like seven different kinds of smoke, mostly marijuana. From breathing all that second hand smoke, I went home with the worst headache. Thanks to your article I now know for sure it was the second hand marijuana smoke. I usually use naturopathic medicine for headaches. I like a product by New Chapter called Headache Take Care. Great Hub, even though I have never tried acupuncture it is something to consider if one suffers from chronic migraines.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
      Author

      Patty Inglish 7 years ago from North America

      Hello, hello - Now that you mention it, my mother had migraines for about 20 years and they disappeared. Fortunately, I have not had one for 10 years, so I think I'm cured. I also recall that if I sat beside another operson that was in the midst of a severe migraine, I would have one myself shortly - something about hormones and other chemicals in the air; there was a defintely aura around one individual before he described it to me - liek the air was too thick and even "tingly." Odd.

      emohealer - If ths Hub can help anyone, I will be glad of it. Thansk for reading it and putting to use in that way.

      myawn - acupuncture and acupressure might help your back, but sometimes stretching exercises will do the trick; sometimes a doctor is needed. Hope the pain is not very severe.

      Thanks to everyone that has commented.

    • Pamela99 profile image

      Pamela Oglesby 7 years ago from United States

      Patty, A nice hub with good information.

    • soni2006 profile image

      Rajinder Soni 7 years ago from New Delhi, India

      This is another excellent hub from you Patty.

    • myawn profile image

      myawn 7 years ago from Florida

      Interesting reading about the headaches from migranes. I have pain in my back.

    • emohealer profile image

      Sioux Ramos 7 years ago from South Carolina

      Excellent, excellent information! I have never suffered a migraine, so your detail of the experience helps me to assist others who experience this pain. Another great example of what TCM and Chinese medicine can do and the effective results it gets. Isn't that what is most important, the results? Thanks for a great helpful hub, helping the world to look at healing and health from a different perspective. sue

    • Hello, hello, profile image

      Hello, hello, 7 years ago from London, UK

      My mother suffered terribly with it. It was really awful to see. Thank you for your helpful hub and I am sure migrane sufferers will be grateful.

    • Sandyspider profile image

      Sandy Mertens 7 years ago from Wisconsin, USA

      This is something worth trying. Nice information.