ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

High Levels of Creatinine in your blood

Updated on April 26, 2016

A Look at your Kidneys

What is creatinine?

With Obesity being such a major issue of concern these days, many people are trying to change their bad habits and become more fit and healthy. Understanding and knowing what needs to be done for overall health and wellness is one thing, actually being disciplined enough to do them is another. If you know, understand and pay attention to your body, it will tell you when something is not right. All you have to do is listen to it. Unless you have been some kind of a hermit, hiding out in an isolated cave or something for the last twenty some odd years, you already know or have heard of creatine. Besides being produced in the human body naturally in low quantities, it's one of the most widely used and controversial sports nutrition supplements you can buy on the market today and can be found in pretty much any vitamin, nutrition store or even your neighborhood grocery store. In a different form, ATP (adenosine triphosphate), or creatine is an intricate part of the body's production of the energy process. Produced in your liver, it's mostly found in the skeletal muscles of the human body. You know what creatine is, so then what is creatinine you ask? Is there really a difference between the two of them? Creatinine is actually the end product of phosphocreatine metabolism. Once your body uses creatine, it's changed into creatinine. So now your asking why would you buy and take a sports supplement that your body already produces naturally at a pretty consistent rate (depending on how much muscle mass you have)? Although it's found abundantly in red meats and a variety of fish and the human body does produce it naturally, it can not produce nearly enough to reap all the athletic performance (strength and muscle) benefits of taking it as a nutritional supplement.

How Creatinine is moved through the Body

Explination of how muscles contract

Where does Creatinine come from?

Creatinine is actually the molecule waste product of creatine, coming from your normal muscle contractions. A naturally occurring amino acid found in muscle tissue that assists in keeping your body strong and youthful. It's transported through the bloodstream into the kidneys. The kidneys will control your creatinine levels by filtering it out through the urine. Depending on your activity, your body naturally produces it to a certain level. Under normal circumstances, the levels in the body generally do not change from day to day. If you are into body building/fitness competitions or developing muscles through a strength and weight training routine just to stay fit and healthy, your levels are more than likely going to be a lot higher than normal. High levels of creatinine in your blood without exercise usually means there is some type of problem in the body, presumably in the kidneys. This would be one of those "tell tell" signs of the body that something is wrong that you should pay attention too.


Men naturally have more muscle then women

More Muscle, means more creatinine

Since creatinine is the by product of muscle contractions and it's a fact that men naturally have a lot more muscle mass in their body than a women does (women have more fat then muscle), men are generally going to have much higher levels of creatinine in their system than that of a woman. Ladies you can blame it on mother nature, God or whatever reason it is that men have a lot more muscle tissue than you do, but that's just the way it is. Men usually will have anywhere from .6 to 1.2 milligrams of creatinine in their bodies at any point during the day, versus women who will generally have approximately .5 to 1.1 on any given day.

Causes of Decreased/Increased Plasma Creatinine

Structure of creatine and creatinine molecules

Created Naturally in the body

Totally created naturally in your body, it's absolutely not affected by your diet/eating habits no matter how bad or good they are nor is it affected by physical activities, no matter how active you are. It's primary function is to alert of kidney disease of any kind of malfunction. Any type of condition that impedes the proper functioning of the kidneys, will most likely increase the creatinine levels. It also can be a red flag of renal disease and dehydration. Problems with your thyroid can cause creatinine levels to increase or decrease. Serum Creatinine is a blood test, usually performed during a physical examination by a health care professional that evaluates the kidneys and their proper functionality. The down side to the serum creatinine is that it does not become abnormal until there is already extensive damage to the kidneys. These test can also assist a doctor in determining other things such as your race, gender and even your age.


Symptoms of High creatinine levels

Do you have any symptoms of High creatinine levels?

See results

High levels of creatinine can affect the kidneys

Diet versus Creatinine Levels

The levels of creatinine in your blood measures how effectively the kidneys are functioning. Both low and high creatinine levels usually indicate diminished kidney function. Being that all the diseases that affect the kidneys are naturally progressive and if nothing is done to prevent and maintain them, the condition will continue to get worse so it's imperative to restore efficient kidney function as quickly as possible. Your doctor can assess how serious the situation of your kidneys is by the levels of your creatinine. Normal adult levels will range between approximately 0.6 to 1.2 mg/dL. As stated previous it's created naturally in the body, so there really isn't a specific diet that will change your creatinine values. However there are some dietary changes that can be made to assist in the reduction of some of the symptoms of kidney disease and prevent the more important detrimental effects of renal failure. The restrictions put on your eating habits by your doctor will be individually based on lab test results, blood pressure and a variety of other factors associated with the symptoms that are involved. Sodium is directly related to blood pressure, limiting your sodium intake has shown to be very beneficial. The kidneys control phosphorus levels and high levels of phosphorus being what makes you itch uncontrollably. So individuals experience kidney malfunction should avoid high phosphorus foods such as milk products, dried beans, organ meats and oh yeah, that beer you like to drink. Ironically foods high in potassium should also be avoided, as potassium can cause nerves to fire erratically resulting in irregular heart activity. Under normal circumstances broccoli, squash, oranges and potatoes are considered to be healthy, but not when the kidneys are not functioning properly, as they are high in potassium. Excess protein is excreted by the kidneys, so when you are experiencing kidney malfunction, protein intake should also be moderated.

Tests for BUN/Creatinine levels told by Dr. Tom Wade

Dangers in High Levels of Creatinine

Normal levels will always differ and will be dependent upon the amount of muscle tissue in your body, your current weight, age and gender. Produced by the body consistently, there is little fluctuation unless there is some type of problem/affliction within the body. The symptoms to elevated levels can vary anywhere from fatigue, shortness of breath, swelling and confusion. Dehydration and damaged muscle tissue from trauma will also cause higher creatinine levels in the blood. These test are usually performed during routine blood work in a health check up or if a health care professional has some reason to believe there is an issue with your kidneys. If you are experiencing some of these symptoms and think your kidneys are not functioning properly, make sure you request a test from your physician the next time you see him.

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • awordlover profile image

      awordlover 4 years ago

      good hub. I'm putting a link on mine to send readers here for more information. :-)

    • Alphadogg16 profile image
      Author

      Kevin W 4 years ago from Texas

      Thank you, I appreciate the feedback.

    Click to Rate This Article