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Do Boar Bristle Brushes Reverse Hair Loss?

Updated on March 31, 2012

Do Boar Bristle Brushes Reverse Hair Loss?

Boar bristle brushes have been long touted as a tool to improve the hair of ones health. In recent times, many are suggesting that this tool is an effective means of treating baldness. One blog that is picking up steam around the web recounts the story of how a woman was able to completely reverse her hair loss with just a boar bristle brush and patience. Does this mean every sufferer of hair loss should start brushing?

Why Would Boar Bristle Brushes Work?

Pure boar bristle brushes are designed to safely brush dry hair. This works because boar bristle is capable of brushing though non-tangled hair with ease without causing damage to the hair or the scalp. The boar bristle itself has a stimulating effect on the hair, the scalp, and follicles. Like a massage, this technique draws blood to the scalp area.

Blood carries nutrients to the scalp that helps hair grow. The theory of boar bristle brushing makes sense. If one stimulates their scalp while drawing nutrients to their follicles, they could conceivable spur a new growth cycle to inactive follicles that have entered a dormant phase.

Boar bristle brushes also distribute the natural oil “sebum” evenly throughout your scalp and hair. While many hold sebum responsible for hair loss, I believe it is only the accumulation of sebum that plays any role. Sebum can be good for your hair when evenly distributed.

Removing sebum completely would only cause the sebaceous glands to produce more of this oil. Boar bristle brushing does a wonderful job at spreading this oil evenly across the hair shaft.

How Long Would It Take To See Regrowth?

The time it would take to see results would vary from person to person. The one aspect that seems clear is that you must be consistent with the technique to see results. I used this technique in combination with many other techniques and got about ninety percent of my hair in a six to eight month period. I can’t say for sure if boar bristle was a major factor in my results.

Should I Start Using Boar Bristle Brushes?

This is a decision ultimately up to you. I first learned the power of using boar bristle years ago from a hair stylist. I bought one and have never stopped using it in my personal hair care maintenance. In my opinion, it is a no-brainer to add a boar bristle brush to your current hair loss approach. The brush is designed to create a better environment for hair to prosper which makes it a valuable hair care tool.

What Type Of Boar Bristle Brush Should I Buy?

While there are many companies who have embraced this theory and are marketing expensive boar bristle brushes, one need not spend hundreds of dollars to add this tool to their hair care regimen. Cost is not the determining factor; it is the purity of the bristle that matters. Many brushes combine boar bristle with nylon. Avoid these brushes.

What you are looking for is a one-hundred percent pure boar bristle brush. This brush can be had for ten to twenty dollars at any beauty supply store. If you buy a boar bristle brush, it is important to keep it clean so that it will work optimally. I simply fill a cup with hot water and a pump of shampoo.

I then swirl the brush for a minute and let it soak for ten more minutes. I then remove the brush and run my hand down the bristles to ring out excess water. From there, I let the brush dry out for the rest of the day and commence use the next day. I clean the brush once every one to two weeks.

How Often Should I Use A Boar Bristle Brush?

While in the aforementioned blog, a woman claims to have used this technique constantly, I have found that ten to fifteen minute of thorough brushing in the morning and at night will do a lot for your hair. Fortunately, boar bristle brushes were designed to be safe on your hair and scalp, which means you can get away with using this tool frequently without worrying about overdoing the routine,

I use the brush religiously, but it is only one part of the routine I use to keep the hair I have managed to regrown. Don’t underestimate the power of this simple and inexpensive tool. This beautiful instrument will help make your scalp an optimal place for hair regrowth. The brush also feels great on the scalp when in use. Don’t hesitate when thinking about this inexpensive investment in your hair care.

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    • profile image

      Keris 

      3 years ago

      Hi there, I'm a twenty nine year old male suffering from hair thinning on my temples and crown, I have a boar bristle brush 100%, and have been using it for a week. My questions are when should you start seeing improvement I.e regrowth, and secondly did u combine the brush with any topical solutions?

      Your help would be most welcomed as a hair transplant is out of the question, and the shampoos like the coffee one are useless. I look forward to your reply

      Many Thanks

    • profile image

      Dave 

      4 years ago

      I would also like to know what other techniques you are using, too.

    • profile image

      john 

      6 years ago

      You mention other techniques, what other techniques are you doing to get 90% of your hair back?

    • samueljreed profile imageAUTHOR

      samueljreed 

      6 years ago from Northern California

      Thanks for your insights Bill, wounding the skin seems to be a theory growing in popularity being used in the application of even the newest techniques and procedures. The article does not make the contention that boar bristle brushing alone will regrow hair, rather that it is an inexpensive technique that positively affects the scalp.

      As far as genetics go, I think genetics is far too simplistic, I believe we must explore what genetics do that cause men and women to lose their hair. If boar bristle stimulates blood flow, it is then acting on the same premise as Minoxidil, which in theory should produce similar results. Of course as with Minoxidil, one must allow an adequate amount of time to pass to measure the efficacy of one such technique.

      Best Wishes,

      Samuel

    • profile image

      Bill Seemiller 

      6 years ago

      Interesting article. As the managing publisher of various hair loss websites, I've seen and discussed the concept using of slightly wounding the skin using products such as the Nanogen scalproller which allegedly allows easy absorption of topical treatments into the scalp. But I haven't seen any evidence that brushing hair with boar or other type of bristles can stimulate hair follicles and help them grow.

      Also, very few people experience hair loss form sebum build-up. Most causes of hair loss is genetic.

      Best wishes,

      Bill

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