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Facing The Lupus Giant: My Lupus Diagnosis

Updated on April 24, 2017
Gina Welds-Hulse profile image

Natural Health Coach, Herbalist, Aromatherapy Consultant using the power of essential of essential oils to improve health and well-being.

Picture taken on my 40th birthday.  I was already diagnosed with a heart and lung condition at this point.
Picture taken on my 40th birthday. I was already diagnosed with a heart and lung condition at this point. | Source

Life Before Chronic Illness

There are several narratives that describe my life, but never thought that chronic illness would be one of the stories that would play out in mine. Sometimes I think back to my life before illness, and long for those days when I could run 3 miles without struggling to breathe, back to the days of my martial arts training, back to the days when I could run around and play with my children without having to pause constantly to take a breath.

This story will document a little of my life after lupus. Some images may be disturbing. I have made myself very vulnerable in this particular segment, and I appreciate your comments at the end.

Thank you for allowing me to share my story with you.


Leading up to my Lupus diagosis

After battling with what seemed like endless illnesses, as you can see from the list below, I was finally diagnosed with lupus, and was told that lupus was the culprit all along.

  • Diagnosed with asthma around 2000

  • Diagnosed with heart condition chronic atrial fibrillation late 2006

  • Diagnosed with COPD and mild Emphysema circa 2008

  • Diagnosed with pernicious anemia January 2012

  • Diagnosed with neuropathy February 2012

  • Recommended for lupus screening by the neurologist based on all my other diagnoses

  • Diagnosed with lupus March 2012
  • Diagnosed with depression in May 2012

Since my lupus diagnosis,

  • I have undergone many iron infusions due to severe anemia.
  • I was also diagnosed with a degenerative spine...arthritis.
  • I have also been diagnosed with costochondritis...arthritis in the rib cage.

The Diagnosis: "You have lupus!"

After the diagnosis

Obviously the journey to my lupus diagnosis took several years, as is the norm for many lupus patients. Lupus often mimics other illnesses, so getting the final diagnosis can sometimes take years. Getting this diagnosis of lupus was almost a relief for me. I finally had something to blame for everything that had been happening….but what the heck was lupus. I had no idea of an illness called lupus until my neurologist mentioned it, and then I spent days researching and educating myself on what it was, only to discover there were several kinds. Deep inside I was praying it was just the discoid lupus which affects the skin only…most of the time. However, I knew, based on all my other diagnoses that it would have been systemic lupus.

Once the confirmation came a few weeks later after the second testing, upon the insistence of my primary care doctor, the next question was, “What’s next?”

Source

So I Have Lupus! What's Next?

Based on everything I had read and researched, I had one major question: “Can I die from this?” considering that there have been advances in medical care….never mind the fact that there was only ONE, yes ONE, medicine designed for lupus in 100 years.

I was told that lupus is very unpredictable. I knew that based on research. I was told that the symptoms could range from mild to life-threatening at times. I knew that, also, especially since lupus had already attacked my heart, lungs, peripheral nervous system, stomach. I was told it was a chronic illness. I was told about flares, and about periods of remission that could occur.

AND THEN THERE WAS THE DREADED STATEMENT: THERE IS NO CURE FOR LUPUS! “YOU WILL HAVE LUPUS FOR THE REST OF YOUR LIFE!” I guess that’s what chronic illness means.

However, I was not going to accept the statements that it was "INCURABLE" nor that I was "GOING TO HAVE IT FOR THE REST OF MY LIFE."

What Is Lupus, You Ask?

What Is Lupus?

Lupus, n a nutshell, is an autoimmune disease. It happens when the immune system attacks its own tissues, causing inflammation, swelling, pain, and damage. The immune system mistakes the body's own tissues as foreign invaders and attacks them.

Lupus symptoms include fatigue, joint pain, fever, and a lupus rash.

Some people with lupus suffer only minor inconvenience, while others suffer significant lifelong disability.

Lupus affects people of African, Asian, or Native American descent two to three times as often as it affects whites. Nine out of 10 people with lupus are women. The disease usually strikes between age 15 and 44, although it can occur in older individuals.





Different types of Lupus

Types OF LUPUS

Discoid lupus is characterized by a rash that appears on the face, neck, or scalp. The rash is typically red and scaly, and may cause discomfort and hair loss around irritated areas. When it appears on the face, it is sometimes called a “butterfly rash” because it resembles the wings of a butterfly. Some patients may have the rash for only a few days at a time, while others may suffer rashes that last for months or even years. This type of the disease also causes mouth and nose ulcers, as well as sensitivity to sunlight. In some cases, it may progress to systematic illness.

The best-known type of the condition is systemic lupus. While the illness can cause the rashes common in the discoid variety, it may also affect the skin, blood, nervous system, kidneys, heart, joints, and lungs. Some individuals with the disease have only one or two organs or tissues affected, while others may have many affected organs, systems, or tissues.

Drug-induced lupus is a rare type of the disease caused by the long-term use of certain drugs. Symptoms are similar to those found in discoid and systematic form. Many drugs are linked to this type of the disease, including medications for tuberculosis, high blood pressure, schizophrenia, and Crohn's disease. Only a very small number of people taking these drugs develop this condition and the symptoms generally disappear upon discontinuing the medication.

Neonatal lupus is another rare form of the illness. The condition occurs when women with systematic lupus transfer some of their auto-antibodies to their infant during the birth process. In many cases, this condition is temporary and the symptoms subside within a few months. Rarely, the illness leads to heart defects, skin problems or decreased liver function.

Stiff face and tight skin

There were some days when I could not smile because my face was so stiff and dry.
There were some days when I could not smile because my face was so stiff and dry. | Source

Bleeding gums

Some days my gums would spontaneously bleed.  As a result of this, I have regular dental check-ups.  I have already lost several teeth because of lupus, but have improved gum health.  You will read about that later in another article.
Some days my gums would spontaneously bleed. As a result of this, I have regular dental check-ups. I have already lost several teeth because of lupus, but have improved gum health. You will read about that later in another article. | Source

Lupus rash

Some days I would wake up to a swollen face, with a rash that covered almost all my face, but most of the time it was across my face.
Some days I would wake up to a swollen face, with a rash that covered almost all my face, but most of the time it was across my face. | Source

I have Systemic Lupus!

Yes, I was diagnosed with Systemic Lupus or SLE, as it is called. It has affected my heart, lungs, peripheral nervous system, stomach. It also affects my skin, f I am not careful of how much sun exposure I get. I get kidney function and liver function tests done regularly, as I have mild involvement in those organs. When I was first diagnosed I experienced the butterfly-shaped rash across the bridge of the nose and cheeks. At times it felt like alligator skin.

Aside from the visible effects of systemic lupus, I also experience joint pain in the rib cage called costochondritis, as well as joint pain throughout the rest of the body. Bran involvement is rare, but for some, like myself, lupus can cause confusion, depression, seizures and in more severe cases, even strokes. I have mild seizures relating to the neuropathy, and I also experience severe tinnitus and hearing loss due to lupus-related neuropathy.

During very cold weather I experience what is referred to as Raynaud's syndrome, where the blood vessels in the skin contract, preventing blood from getting to the hands and feet. Most attacks last only a few minutes, can be painful, and often turn the hands and feet white or a bluish color. I have learned to keep my hands warm by wearing gloves.

Lupus Fatigue

Many days I battled fatigue, not being able to work for more than two hours at a time.
Many days I battled fatigue, not being able to work for more than two hours at a time. | Source

Swollen feet

I have to be very careful of how long I am on my feet, as they get swollen very easily, and with neuropathy, I tend to lose feelings very often in my feet.
I have to be very careful of how long I am on my feet, as they get swollen very easily, and with neuropathy, I tend to lose feelings very often in my feet. | Source

No Cure For Lupus!

While there is no cure for the disease, symptoms and flares sometimes respond to treatment. Medications, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be used to treat fevers, joint pain, and discomfort. In some cases, immune-suppressing medications help slow the production of auto-antibodies, thus relieving symptoms. Corticosteroids are also sometimes prescribed to reduce inflammation in the body. Since many immune-suppressants and steroids have serious side effects, they are usually taken on a short-term basis only.

Lifestyles changes are sometimes recommended for those suffering with the disease. Eating a non-inflammatory diet, getting plenty of rest, and avoiding sunlight exposure may help reduce symptoms. Since lupus can be a frustrating and difficult condition to manage, some people benefit from joining support groups or attending therapy. Talking to other people with the disease, or expressing concerns to a supportive doctor or therapist may help reduce the stress and negative emotions associated with a chronic condition.

Lupus and Hair Loss

Ulcers can also occur on the scalp causing hair loss.  It resulted in my own hair falling out in patches.
Ulcers can also occur on the scalp causing hair loss. It resulted in my own hair falling out in patches. | Source
Bandanas or head wraps became a fashion accessory for me during the time my hair was falling out.
Bandanas or head wraps became a fashion accessory for me during the time my hair was falling out. | Source

Loss of toenails

Loss of toenails occurred a few times due to changes resulting to my thyroid.
Loss of toenails occurred a few times due to changes resulting to my thyroid. | Source

Lupus and Oral Concerns

Oral ulcers frequently occur with lupus.  I had to have more frequent dental check-ups as lupus started to affect my teeth.
Oral ulcers frequently occur with lupus. I had to have more frequent dental check-ups as lupus started to affect my teeth.
Sometimes my teeth randomly start to bleed.  This is another reason for the frequent dental check-ups.  I lost several teeth due to lupus, but managed to get it all under control using herbal remedies.
Sometimes my teeth randomly start to bleed. This is another reason for the frequent dental check-ups. I lost several teeth due to lupus, but managed to get it all under control using herbal remedies. | Source

Lupus and Hair Loss

Lupus causes widespread inflammation that usually involves your skin — particularly on your face and scalp. Lupus can cause the hair on your scalp to gradually thin out, although a few people lose clumps of hair. Loss of eyebrow, eyelash, beard and body hair also is possible. I found this out the hard way. My eyelashes started to fall out to the point where wearing mascara made no difference. My eye brows thinned out, but my wonderful daughter showed me make-up tricks to make them look thicker and real....that was important.

I developed round (discoid) lesions on the scalp. These discoid lesions can scar your hair follicles, and can cause permanent hair loss. However, I found out natural ways of treating and reversing the hair loss. I will discuss that in an upcoming Blog, Facing the Giant: My Herbal Journal to Healing.


Neuropathy issues

Some days my toes or fingers would lock in position.  The pain is dreadful when that happens, and all I can do is wait for the pain to subside and the nerves to unlock.
Some days my toes or fingers would lock in position. The pain is dreadful when that happens, and all I can do is wait for the pain to subside and the nerves to unlock. | Source
Fingers stiffened due to neuropathy issues
Fingers stiffened due to neuropathy issues | Source

Lupus and Peripheral Neuropathy

Had it not been for my neurologist, I would probably still be guessing what's wrong with me. After a slew of neurologic tests, he suggested that I get tested after seeing the results. He could not understand how someone in my physical fitness state could possibly have that kind of nerve damage.

I had been suffering with tingling in my hands and feet, then a range of burning sensations, until my doctor finally, at my urging, sent me to see the neurologist.

Symptoms of peripheral neuropathy from lupus can range from mild to serious and mainly affect the hands, feet, legs or arms. They include:

* pain
* burning sensation
* numbness
* tingling
* weakness
* inability to sense heat or cold
* paralysis
* vision problems
* carpal tunnel syndrome

After trying me on B12 supplements and shots that did not work, I was finally sent for lupus testing to determine if in fact that was the culprit.

The Traditional Treatment Plan

Plaquenil in addition to all the other medications that I was on for heart, lungs, neuropathy, pernicious anemia.

WHAT IS PLAQUENIL? Plaquenil is used to treat the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, such as swelling, inflammation, stiffness, and joint pain. It is also prescribed for lupus erythematosus, a chronic connective tissue inflammatory disorder.Immunosupprresant drugs.

I was beginning to question my existence, question God. Why did I end up with this dreaded illness? I had taken excellent care of my body..martial arts, cross country throughout college, and now it seems that my body was rebelling against me….literally attacking me.


I told my doc that I should have had that shot of tequila and smoked that joint when I had the chance.


I felt like he had just given me a death sentence, but I had no intention of dying from this.

An Arsenal Of Pharmaceuticals

Medications include those for heart, lung, neuropathy, costochondritis, arthritis, epi-pen for allergic reactions, depression meds, COPD/emohysema meds, B12 deficiency meds to name a few.
Medications include those for heart, lung, neuropathy, costochondritis, arthritis, epi-pen for allergic reactions, depression meds, COPD/emohysema meds, B12 deficiency meds to name a few. | Source
Lupus rash under and around my eye
Lupus rash under and around my eye | Source
Frequent bruising from having blood-work done so often.
Frequent bruising from having blood-work done so often. | Source
Full rash across the face, but also extended to above my lip as well as chin and neck area.
Full rash across the face, but also extended to above my lip as well as chin and neck area. | Source
Rash frequently felt like the texture of alligator skin...very scaly.  It often flaked off when severely dry.
Rash frequently felt like the texture of alligator skin...very scaly. It often flaked off when severely dry. | Source

My Collapse

My diagnosis occurred on a Tuesday. I immediately started the new treatment. 4 days later, Saturday morning, I woke up feeling very ill. I had already been thinking of more natural remedies to treat this disease. It could be any worse than this archaic remedy, plaquenil. I was nauseous. I was weak. I felt like an alien had taken over my body and was fighting to regain control of it. Mrs. Mango PUT PICTURE HERE.

I remembered driving by what looked like a broken down old shack several times, where, inside held a treasure trove of natural herbal healing remedies. I decided to take the short 3 mile drive with my daughter and youngest son, who were keen on finding out what this place was all about.

While inside I spoke to the Master Herbalist Anneke, told her my symptoms and diagnosis, developed a more natural treatment protocol, and paid for my merchandise, knowing that I was going to be a regular customer here. Throughout this discussion I felt really ill, and was going in and out of the store thinking that I was going to hurl.

After a few minutes, I came to staring up at many faces looking down at me. I was told that I had collapsed and was to be rushed to the hospital. I was told by my daughter, who witmessed it, that it was the most graceful collapse ever. In a nutshell, I fell into a door face-first. Then I fell back, twisted and fell face-first into a table, bounced upwards, before finally falling onto the floor.

When I got to the ER I was questioned about the medication that I took repeatedly and asked if was sure that I should have taken those. After telling the attending ER doctor that I was told to take them together, he informed me that they contributed to my near cardiac arrest state that I was brought in with. I visited my primary care physician a couple of days later and a quick change was made. I also informed him that I would be taking a more natural path from now on. He was not happy, but said, “Let’s see.” I did not quit all pharmaceuticals at once, but I did add some herbal remedies with the pharmaceuticals, under the watchful eye of my herbalist.

Lupus and Heart Issues

Hooked up to the heart monitor again, after going to the ER with atrial fib
Hooked up to the heart monitor again, after going to the ER with atrial fib | Source
Source
My resting heart rate is frequently way over 100 bpm, and very irregular, which is why I have keep an eye out constantly.
My resting heart rate is frequently way over 100 bpm, and very irregular, which is why I have keep an eye out constantly. | Source

Lupus and Heart Issues

How does lupus affect the heart and circulation?

There are many ways in which lupus can affect the heart. It can cause pericarditis, myocarditis, coronary artery disease In my case it puts me into constant atrial fibrillation. I have severe tachycardia as a result. My highest recorded heart beat per minute was 248 BPM. My doctor said he was very surprised that I had not gone into cardiac arrest.

How does lupus affect the Circulatory System?

Inflammation in the circulatory system can cause the following symptoms.

  • Fever
  • Feeling ill
  • Poor appetite
  • Weight loss
  • Headache
  • Blurry vision
  • Seizures
  • Strokes
  • Behavioral disturbances

Many days I ran a low grade fever, had regular headaches. I had started to gain weight from the Cymbalta and other medication I had been taking. I had blurry vision from the effects of the plaquenil, and had even started to hallucinate. As a result I went to see a psychiatrist, who told me I was fine. The images that I had been seeing were ANGELS so he was not in the least bit concerned about my hallucinations. He was concerned about the side-effects of the plaquenil, however.


Look out for part 2 of Facing The Giant: My Herbal Journey To Healing

One of the things that allowed me to progress past my diagnosis was to view myself as someone with a chronic illness, not someone who was chronically ill. The change in attitude, outlook on life kept me from losing my identity as a person.

Lupus was just a small part of my life!

I continue to face the lupus giant daily.

My journey continues to beat this illness.

In my next segment of FACING THE GIANT you will learn of my herbal path so watch out for part two called Facing the Giant: My Herbal Journey to Healing

John Lennon's Tribute to friend who died from lupus, "Lucy In The Sky"

What is Lupus?

If you've just been diagnosed, this book will be helpful!

© 2015 Gina Welds Hulse

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    • Gina Welds-Hulse profile image
      Author

      Gina Welds Hulse 11 months ago from Rockledge, Florida

      Hi Shyron. The surgery went well. I am entering 2017 with a little less of me than I started with in 2016, but it's all good. My farewell letter to those body parts to come soon. (smile) I am still in recovery mode, but oftentimes I forget that there are certain things I am not supposed to do, like lift up anything over 10 pounds. LOL. It's been an interesting recovery.

      I do hope you get some answers and relief. It can be a struggle just trying to find the right doctor who will finally know what to do.

      The New Year will be much better. Has to be! Hugs and blessings.

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image

      Shyron E Shenko 11 months ago from Texas

      Hello Gina, I am so sorry that I did not get back to you. How did the surgery go? I do hope that your surgery was a success.

      You asked if there is an alternative for me, my hubby wants me to go to a neurosurgeon that the ENT specialist recommends, and maybe I will go to see if he can help me, the neurosurgeon that the hospital sent me to, I am not happy with at all.

      Blessings and hugs

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 11 months ago from Central Florida

      Thanks, Gina. I'll email you so I have your address to pass on.

    • Gina Welds-Hulse profile image
      Author

      Gina Welds Hulse 11 months ago from Rockledge, Florida

      Hi Shauna! Happy New Year, my friend! Yes, please feel free to share the article as well as connecting us. I love connecting with fellow Lupies or Lupus Butterflies (as we call ourselves).

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 11 months ago from Central Florida

      Gina, I have a friend who works in the same building as I, who has just been diagnosed with Lupus. I told her about you and the herbal remedies/tinctures you use as an alternative to medications. I will share this article with her, as well as part II. If you don't mind, I'd like to put her in touch with you. Let me know.

    • Gina Welds-Hulse profile image
      Author

      Gina Welds Hulse 13 months ago from Rockledge, Florida

      "I have lupus, lupus doesn't have me." Susan that is a great attitude to have. The lupus journey is a very difficult one and you have been travelling it for a very long time, it seems. I admire you and your tenacity. I have developed arthritis in my spine. Some days are better than others with that kind of pain but I continue to fight.

      Yes sharing your story does help others to know that there is no giving up. We cannot let lupus win. We win with every successful surgery with every day that we get up out of bed or even open our eyes.

      I am so sorry for your loss of your sister. I know that was tough emotionally and physically.

      Please keep in touch. I would love to connect with your further to know how you're doing. You can send me an email via hubpages.

      I will be praying for you doing as you under yet another surgery. I will also be undergoing surgery next week for a complete hysterectomy as I have had a severe bleeding problem that required transfusion infusions. This was my last resort. Let's hold each other up in prayer.

      I am here to tell you that prayer does work. It is also helpful to have a community of fellow warriors who understand what the fight is like.

      Gentle hugs! Much love!

    • profile image

      Susan Williams 13 months ago

      I have had SLE...lupus for 45 years. I also got Rheumatoid Arthritis a few years later. In recent years I developed Spinal Stenosis which is painful too. I have had four surgeries to remove skin cancer from my head. I take approximately 17 medications every day. I had two miscarriages and adopted one child. I am going to have cataract surgery in the next month, one eye at a time. I am concerned about it but will try to have faith in Dr. Who is doing the surgeries. I have problems with skin rashes. I had double pneumonia/sepsis/acute respiratory failure almost four years ago. Because of my age, poor immune system, and other health issues, I had a 10% chance of survival. I am very grateful to still be here. I don't give up easily. I have a good attitude and believe....I have lupus, lupus doesn't have me. I have two sisters with MS. One passed away six months ago. My body really responded to that trauma. Stress is not good for lupus.

      It is helpful to share my story. Hope you found it interesting.

      Susan

    • Gina Welds-Hulse profile image
      Author

      Gina Welds Hulse 14 months ago from Rockledge, Florida

      Hi Shyron. Thanks for stopping by. I am so sorry you are dealing with those health issues. Yes, the choice to have surgery or not is usually a tough one. I am preparing for surgery in a few weeks, after one unsuccessful one a few weeks ago. This next one is my last resort to stop some very aggravating bleeding that has caused even more health concerns. It was a very tough decision to go ahead with this coming surgery.

      Are there no other options for you?

      Yes, counting down to a miracle!

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image

      Shyron E Shenko 14 months ago from Texas

      Dear Gina, I have learned so much from you, I do hope that you have discovered a cure for Lupus.

      When I read about illness like this, I think about my hubby, and the miracle that saved his life (Countdown to a Miracle.)

      I have a tumor that caused tinnitus and vertigo, but I will not let the neurosurgeon operate, for several reasons.

      You are an inspiration.

      Blessings and hugs.

    • Gina Welds-Hulse profile image
      Author

      Gina Welds Hulse 21 months ago from Rockledge, Florida

      Hope it helps.

    • Jay C OBrien profile image

      Jay C OBrien 21 months ago from Houston, TX USA

      Thank you so much for your information. I will try and apply it.

    • Gina Welds-Hulse profile image
      Author

      Gina Welds Hulse 21 months ago from Rockledge, Florida

      Hi Jay C., Allow me to post a comment that I posted on my lupus page just this morning. I agree with you that poor elimination can be a factor, but there are so many other factors to consider.

      "It is estimated that about 50 percent of Americans have an abundance of parasitic organisms in their gut. Parasites enter the human body through the air we breathe, the food we eat and the water we drink. How do you get rid of them? Starve them! Parasites love sugar and everything that turns into sugar. So the best way to starve the parasites is through using healthy fasting and cleansing strategies while eliminating as much sugar and grains as possible from the diet.

      Several herbs and foods act as very strong anti-parasitic agents. Extra virgin coconut oil is loaded with medium chain triglycerides that enhance the immune system in its battle against pathogens. Raw garlic and onions provide sulfur containing amino acids that are anti-parasitic. Eat six tablespoons of raw, extra virgin coconut oil, one whole clove of garlic and one large red onion daily to help parasite proof your body.

      Dried oregano and especially essential oil of oregano are extremely volatile and anti-parasitic. Use two to three drops of oregano oil in water with fresh squeezed lemon and drink this three times a day. Clove works just as well so you could also substitute or use clove oil with oregano oil. Ginger, wormwood, black walnut are also commonly used in anti-parasitic strategies.

      Fasting with fermented drinks such as fermented whey from grass-fed cows and fermented ginger, kombucha, coconut kefir, apple cider vinegar, etc. are powerful tools to help destroy parasites. Many holistic health coaches recommend a three to 21 day low calorie, liquid diet that is rich in fermented beverages, water and fresh squeezed lemon. Probiotic supplements are highly recommended to help destroy parasites and re-inoculate the gut.

      After the cleansing period, it is especially important to utilize high quality, fermented raw dairy and vegetables. Raw, grass-fed fermented dairy products like amasai, cheese and kimchi, sauerkraut, and fermented veggies should be used abundantly. These foods are rich sources of L-glutamine, an amino acid that helps rebuild the gut. These fermented foods also contain very powerful strains of good bacteria, organic acids and enzymes that act to keep parasites out of the body.

      However, if you do have lupus, some parasites could be beneficial to your body in its fight against autoimmunity. Let me draw your attention to the following article. http://www.news-medical.net/…/Parasites-cou...

      However, before starting any alternative protocol or cleanse, please consult with your doctor, and do a cleanse under the supervision of your doctor.

      On a personal note: My favorite items for cleansing parasites are diatomaceous earth, wormwood and black walnutnut. (I have a tincture made from the latter two items, and it is quite powerful.) I use all the other herbs mentioned...on a daily basis.

      Always replenish your body after a cleanse using the tips given above.

      Please post your comments below. I would love to know if you do cleansing as part of your treatment protocol. How often do you perform a cleanse?

      http://fitlife.tv/8-herbs-that-kill-internal-paras...

      I don't see proper elimination as the cure-all for this but I do see it as a necessary addition to everybody's health protocol, especially those with autoimmune illnesses.

      A sick gut is the leading cause of so many illnesses. Heal the gut and the body can be healed. After all, 75% (based on where you read it could be more) of our immune system resides in the gut....so it stands to reason that if you heal the gut, you can heal the body.

      Thoughts??