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Factor II Leiden Genetic Mutation

Updated on September 15, 2011

Hereditary Hypercoagulability Disorder

A new genetic marker for Thrombophilia, Factor II was identified in 1969 by the same group that identified Factor V Leiden. Wikipedia describes this mutation as, Substitution of adenine for guanine at position 20210 of the prothrombin gene, known as the prothrombin 20210a mutation, prothrombin 20210 mutation and less precisely just factor II mutation, leads to hypercoagulability and may be a factor that contributes to infertility. To understand this genetic mutation we have to understand how prothombin works. "Prothrombin is a protein in the blood that is required for the blood to clot. It is also called factor II. Blood clots are composed of a combination of blood platelets and a meshwork of the blood clotting protein fibrin. Prothrombin is a blood clotting protein that is needed to form fibrin. If somebody has too little prothrombin, he or she has a bleeding tendency. If an individual has too much prothrombin, blood clots may form when they shouldn’t."

Factor II is an inherited predisposition to develop blood clots which can affect other family members. Everyone inherits two copies of the prothrombin gene, one from your father and one from your mother. If only one of those genes are mutated, you are heterozygous for the gene mutation. If both genes are mutated, you are homozygous. Heterozygous prothrombin mutations are found in about 2% of the US white population and is most common in those with southern European ancestry. It is theorized that the mutation originated with one common ancester. The mutation is rarely found in African Americans, Asians, or Native Americans. The homozygous form (two inherited mutated genes) is considered uncommon, with an expected occurrence of approximately one (1) in ten thousand (10,000) individuals. The prothrombin 20210 mutation is found in both men and in women and has nothing to do with blood type. This mutation is a major risk factor for venous thrombosis and certain arterial thrombotic conditions.

There are some definitive health risks for those with the genetic mutation. It increases the risk of developing  deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Typically blood clots occur in the deep veins and are considered dangerous because they can damage the veins, and lead to pain and swelling. In some instances it can even result in disability. The risk factor of DVT increases with age.

Women increase their risk of (DVT) when using estrogen-containing oral contraceptives. It is theorized that this may be a contributing factor to stillbirth, second trimester pregnancy loss, placental abruption, and preeclampsia.

DNA testing for the prothrombin mutation is recommended for all patients with deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, cerebral vein thrombosis, and premature ischemic stroke, and women with premature myocardial infarction. If this mutation is found in one family member, all members of the immediate family should be tested.

MY STORY
I had an early morning meeting and shortly after the meeting started I began feeling short of breath. Having asthma, I used my inhaler a number of times, but continued to have problems. After the meeting I walked several blocks back to work and realized that something else must be wrong. When I reached my office I asked the department manager to re-assign my afternoon appointments. He insisted on taking me the the emergency room. I very calmly told the receptionist that I was having a heart attack. It was hours before the cardiologist arrived. His initial diagnosis was a typical one; he believed I was having a panic attack. My internist decided to be cautious and admitted me for observation.

Early the next morning I had a second heart attack. The duty nurse told me that my bloodwork,from the night before, confirmed that I had a heart attack when I went to the emergency room. A skilled nursing staff quickly brought the attack under control with morphine. A few hours later number three hit and that one hurt! It was a Saturday and the heart catheter team wasn't available. I am thankful that a very angry nurse who called the doctor and insisted he do something. The team was brought in and the test revealed clotting in veins in the lower left ventrical. The real mystery was why? I had an exceptionally healthy heart, with clean wide caliper veins and arteries. The doctors best guess was that I had Prinzmetal angina.

A few months later my sister had a very similar heart attack and her cardiologist tested her for the hereditary gene mutation and she had it! She was also diagnosed with Prinzmetal angina. It was only then that I was tested and found that I had it too, which explained my mysterious heart attacks. Many of my direct ancestors died of heart attacks. It made me wonder just how many of them carried the mutation and could have lived a much longer life with the proper medication.

I have six siblings and so far three out of seven have tested positive for the prothrombin (factor II) mutation 20210. Two of the next generation have tested positive, but sadly some family members refuse to be tested, saying they don't want to know.

Coronary heart disease is America's No. 1 killer. It is very important to be tested if you have had any problem with deep vein clots or a history of heart attacks in your family. Women are at a higher risk when taking birth control. And if you are a woman reading this, we don't have the same warnings signs as men! For women it may seem like indigestion or in my case a problem with my asthma.

The good news is there are tests to determine if you have hereditary hypercoagulability and it can be treated with blood thinners. If you have a hereditary hypercoagulability disorder and have had a heart attack or deep vein thrombosis, please share your story in the comments section. If enough people are interested, I will start an online forum for discussion and add the link here.

NOTE: 50% of the royalties earned by this Squidoo lens goes to the American Heart Association.

The American Heart Association published this list of warning signs:

Chest discomfort. Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or that goes away and comes back. It can feel like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain.   Discomfort in other areas of the upper body. Symptoms can include pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach.    Shortness of breath with or without chest discomfort.   Other signs may include breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea or lightheadedness       

For more information and some great references on this top, please read the article published by the American Heart Association. They recommended  the following reference materials:

  1. DeStefano V, Martinelli I, Mannucci P, et al. The risk of recurrent deep venous thromboembolism among heterozygous carriers of the G20210A prothrombin gene mutation. Br J Hematol. 2001; 113: 630–635. [CrossRef] [Medline] [Order article via Infotrieve]
  2. Hellmann EA, Leslie N, Moll S. Knowledge and information satisfaction of individuals with factor V Leiden mutation. J Thromb Hemost. 2003; 1: 2335–2339.
  3. Martinelli I, Taioli E, Bucciarelli P, et al. Interaction between the G20210A mutation of the prothrombin gene and oral contraceptive use in deep vein thrombosis. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 1999; 19: 700–703.[Abstract/Free Full Text]
  4. McGlennen R, Key N. Clinical and laboratory management of the prothrombin G20210A mutation. Arch Pathol Lab Med. 2002; 126: 1219–1325.[Medline] [Order article via Infotrieve]
  5. Ornstein, D, Cushman M. Factor V Leiden. Circulation. 2003; 107: e94–e97.[CrossRef] [Medline] [Order article via Infotrieve]
  6. Reich L, Bower M, Key N. Role of the geneticist in testing and counseling for inherited thrombophilia. Gen Med. 2003; 5: 133–143.
  7. Ridker PM, Hennekens C, Miletich J. G20210A mutation in prothrombin gene and risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, and venous thrombosis in a large cohort of US men. Circulation. 1999; 99: 999–1004.[Medline] [Order article via Infotrieve]
  8. Rosendaal F, Vessey M, Rumley A, et al. Hormonal replacement therapy, prothrombotic mutations and the risk of venous thrombosis. Br J Hematol. 2002; 16: 851–854.
  9. Vandenbroucke J, Rosing J, Bloemenkamp K, et al. Oral contraceptives and the risk of venous thrombosis. N Engl J Med. 2001; 344: 1527–1535.[Free Full Text]
  10. Deborah Okner Smith. Factor V Leiden/Thrombophilia Support Page. Available at: http://www.fvleiden.org. Accessed May 18, 2004.

Educational Resources and Forums on DVT

Knowledge is power. When it comes to knowledge about DVT and FACTOR II, this knowledge could save your life. Tests for Factor II and other hereditary hypercoagulability disorders usually occur after a serious event for a variety of reasons. Learn the warning signs and if in doubt, get tested.

Factor II Leiden - hereditary hypercoagulability disorder

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Hi Shelby,

      Your story is very similar to mine, i still have A lot of problems with my leg/groin. My right leg is about 2" bigger than my left (i tried everything they told me to do to try to help with the swelling, a healthy weight, wore compression stockings etc) but lately i get really bad pains which i can feel deep down in my groin, the doctor has told me this is where it was damaged deep down in the veins when i had my big clot in the groin...there is nothing they can do! the veins in my leg (up the back of calf and around the ankle) the veins there have started to collapse due to the damage, this is all very painful but again they have told me they can't do anything and said its called chronic venous insufficiency. This is all from the clots back in 2006, my lungs are runied from the PE's, i get very out of breath which im told is from scar tissue (clots leave scar tissue).

      I am meeting with a hematologist to discuss a new blood thinning drug in August, this would be to replase my warfarin (i find warfarin so annoying, always up and down every know i change nothing in my diet etc, its never stable) Im told with this new drug there would be no need for regular INR checks etc. I will let you know how this goes :)

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      SharronMirikitani 4 years ago

      @anonymous: I wish you the best Dee. I made it through four pregnancies undiagnosed. I am glad you have been diagnosed early.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Thank you so much for all your information. I was just recently diagnosed as well after being short of breath and fainting. I am 14 weeks pregnant and my high risk ob heard something in my heart during a routine exam. I was sent to a cardiologist and am now on levenox which is safe during pregnancy. I also have asthma and thought that was the cause, thank God my doctors didn't give up until they found it. Thank you for your information it was so helpful and my siblings are being checked for it this week.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Thank you for this... I don't feel so alone now. I was wondering if t h e recharge other ways to safely regulate factors2.... warfarin scares me. I have been on it for four years now ans my insurance just got cancelled.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      I was diagnosed with a severe DVT in my right leg when I was only 20 years old. I was unaware that I too had Factor II Leiden.My clot was throughout my entire right leg from hip to ankle. Luckily I caught it before it traveled to my lungs. I was in the hospital for over 2 weeks learning all of these new things about my body and trying to stay positive about how much my life would change because of this. My right leg is still swollen, the calf is about 2" bigger than the left leg and my thigh is around 1" larger. My symptoms started with the swelling and eventually led to me waking up one morning not being able to move or walk. It's now 2 years later and I'm still battling post thrombotic symptoms.Recently I've been in a lot of pain with stabbing/throbbing pains in my inner right thigh and throughout my groin/hip. My legs are still swollen and although my blood has been therapeutic for over 7 month's, my last INR results showed my blood being so thick it looks as if I've never been on blood thinners. I've gotten a Doppler, CT scan, chest X-ray, VQ test,etc. all within the last week because of my symptoms. However, neither the doctors nor myself can figure out what is going on and why this pain is occurring again.Has this happened with anyone else?

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Hi, I had two ocasions where my right are went very weak and almost numb. The second time I decided to go to the Dr. to see what it could be. The Dr was very concerned about the possibility of a stroke, and they immediately put me on Aggrenox. They then tested me for any clotting dissorders, and I ended up being possitive for Prothrombin 20210a / Factor II Leiden Genetic Mutation. The Dr asked if I had a daughter that might be on BCP's....and I did, and yes she was BCP's to regulate her menstrual cycles. They told me to tell her to stop taking them until she was screened. We had her screened and she tested possitive. She will be using the Implanon which is implanted just under the skin and is progestrone....which should help to regulate her without the estrogen risk.

      I also have Chronic Venous Insufficency and with the risk of DVT's I wear 20-30 compression pantyhose to hopefully reduce the chances of developing a DVT. The hose really help to alleviate the pressure that builds up from the blood pooling in the legs. I highly recommend them to people that have these symtoms.

      Everybody be well

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      SharronMirikitani 5 years ago

      @Bobski606: Thank you for sharing your story. They tested me for Factor V. Apparently, they are similar. What you went through was incredible. Sharing your story and educating other is so important. All family members should be tested. I have family members who REFUSE to be tested and one sister who tested positive to FACTOR II that won't take warfarin for religious reasons. Yesterday, I had a good friend give me all kinds of reasons that I shouldn't be on warfarin. I simply said, "If I don't take it, I die!" I am a professional genealogist and in my family tree, I research cause of death. Over 95% of the deaths on both sides of my family are from heart attacks or strokes. I don't like those statistics. My mom tested positive, but I have a feeling my dad may have carried it as well. That same sister, who refuses to take warfarin, cares for my elderly mother and has refused warfarin treatment for my mother as well.

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      SharronMirikitani 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Jean,

      Thank you for sharing your story. Awareness is so important. I am one of seven and three of us, who have been tested, have the mutation. I have one sister, and even my children, who refused to be tested. Be well.

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      Bobski606 5 years ago

      After 4 years of being poorly I was finally diagnosed with Factor V leiden. My story is very similar to your's and Hannah's. I was admitted to hospital with pain in my leg and shortness of breath (which I put down to asthma). I had a Doppler scan which revealed a clot in my groin and the MRI and CT showed multiple clots in my lungs and a 3ft clot running from my tummy down to my left ankle. I was stabilized and now I have an IVC filter in my main vein to stop bits of the bigger clot reaching vitals bits. I'm now on heparin (Clexane) that I inject twice a day and at some point will be moved across to warfarin. It was scary as hell as I'm sure you'll remember. I wrote a bit more about my story on my about me lens and I'm working on a separate lens about FVL. I'd appreciate your input if you have anything to add. Thanks, Bobski.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Several years ago my brother died at the age of 48 of a pulmonary embolism. He was 1 year older than me. We were notified after his autopsy that he had prothrombin gene mutation and the family should be tested. I believe I was the only one that didn't have it but had other things he had. I had had a heart attack at the age of 42, years before his death.. My nephew died at the age of 2 1/2 months old due to a stroke he had prothombin gene mutation too. My mother died at age 69 due to strokes and heart attacks her first heart attack was at age 59 and her first major stroke was at 60. We believe she might have had the mutation. I am 55 now and see a cardiologist every 3 months and haven't had another heart attack.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Hiya, I have bought my own INR machine now and they are going to train me how to use it today, this will give me peace of mind so that when ever I'm not feeling to great I can make sure my INR level is right! When I got taken into hospital on Saturday it had dropped to 1.9 for some reason! Mine needs to be between 2.5-3.5! The machine has cost me £300 but worth every penny I think

      I am hoping the appointment for the echo comes through ASAP as I still have pins and needles all down my left arm!! Does anyone else feel tired all the time? I feel very weak at the moment as well

      I am going to look up the condition you have and read all about it

      Thank you for your help x

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      I am 22. I have 2 girls and was just planning on having a third child. But life thought it would be great to throw me a curve ball. I was sitting down and had a shooting pain sort of like your limb falling a sleep but worse. I had a cold a few days before that i was coughing up just a little bit of blood. A week later on January 17th 2012 I woke up with pain in my chest. It felt like someone had hit me on my right side with a sledgehammer. I called the ER and told them I was on my way. I had my husband watch our children. When I was there I refused medication that would alter me because I had an hour to drive to school when I left the hospital. They took blood work and came up with nothing, gave me Ibpofin (i can't really spell) and sent me on my way. I went to school still in pain, went home and had some medication from back pain I was having a few months prior. The pills and a heat pad was the only way I made it through the night. In the morning I woke up to go to work and couldn't lift my right arm to even take off my pajamas. We live with my mother so I woke her up and told her she needed to drive me to the hospital. We went and sat for about two hours. They took more blood and came back and told me I had a pulmonary embolism. I was admitted. They told me that since I smoked and was on birth control pills, it caused my blood clot. I had been on the pills for exactly 1 1/2 months and had always smoked when on birth control.

      After a week in the hospital I was able to go home. A few weeks later I had a sharp pain in my chest, and again went to the ER because my mother thought I had a heart attack. The day before I had been in bed sick (vomiting, cold sweats, muscle pain). I went to the ER and when they hooked me up to their machines my heart rate was 120 give or take a few beats.

      They took blood test and EKG. The doctors said nothing was wrong and it was all in my head. This did not make me feel any better.

      I am on coumadin. I just found out the other day (02/27/2012) that I have single mutation factor 2. I also have Lupas Anticoagulant (this is what they diagnosed me with first and later found the factor 2).

      If ANYONE can help me understand what is going on I would be forever grateful. Also I have been having migraines for a little over a week. Does this have anything to do with the medication or clots that i don't know about or are the doctors right saying its all in my head?

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Hannah,

      Thank you for sharing your story. What happened to you is similar to what others have experienced. The heart flutters.... Well, I have had them ever since the heart attacks. The originally diagnosed me with Prinz Metal Variant Spasms and my sister was diagnosed with it too. There must be a connection between Factor II and Prinz Metal Variant Spasm. The good news that it has been over 10 years now and I rarely had the spasms. The fast and slow heartbeat is something different. It is good you get tested.

      About clotting while on blood thinners... yes, it is possible. Diet is a very tricky thing and can greatly affect the INR which you are aware of already. They have a finger prick tester for INR. I wish they would make it available for home monitoring.

      I would never take oral birth control or shots again. There must be safe alternatives. Please keep us updated on your progress.

      Sharron

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Sorry I forgot to say that in 2006 they had put it down to being on the contraceptive pill that triggered off all the blood clots do I am never allowed to take the pill again

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Hi, I'm 24, in 2006 I was diagnosied with factor ll, it all started when I had a really bad pain in my leg and my leg swelled up..it was cold to touch and was turning blue! I was getting short of breath but just though I was unfit!! Eventually I went to hospital to find out what was going on as I couldn't take the pain anymore! They did a few tests and found I had a clot in the groin and a PE in each lung! After 8months they did the test and found the factor ll, I was put on warfarin for life and I am very strict on myself about what I eat etc and I don't drink (this can affect your INR reading) but in 2011 I had another PE...whilst on warfarin!!! And I've just been let out of hospital after 4 days, this is what happened a few days ago...I was just sat on the sofa watching tele when suddenly when heart rate went crazy and it was spasming, I had pins and needles in my arms and pains down my left arm, I couldn't breathe properly so I called 999, ambulance took me to hospital they recorded my heart rate and it kept going up to around 170...when it first started it must have been over 200! It kept happening over a couple of days and they said my heart was "fluttering" they first thought it was another PE because of the symptoms! I was allowed home last night and overnight I was getting pains and pins and needles again! I had been given tablets to slow my heart down and I'm currently waiting for an echo on my heart and to wear a heart monitor for 48hours which will constantly record my heart rhythm!

      I cannot understand why I clot whilst on warfarin, has anyone else experienced this??? And also I am worried something is going to happen to my heart as it can't be normal for this to be happening?? What can I do?

      Thanks

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      SharronMirikitani 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Your story is a familiar one. I will try to give you a little more information to help you. I am 63-years old, but never found out that I had Factor II until long after my heart attacks. My sister had a heart attack and her doctor discovered the genetic mutation.

      The good news is that I had four successful pregnancies, but I wasn't on blood thinners. I have one sister with Factor II that does not take blood thinners, but keeps her levels low with the food she eats. The food you eat, smoking and birth control are all things that will impact the thickness of your blood. Learn as much as you can about foods that thicken the blood. Examples of foods that thicken are beef and lettuce.

      Migraines? Well, I suffered with severe migraines most of my life. None of the specialists could figure out why I was having them. These were the severe ones that caused be to black out. Two things seemed to help. #1 was biofeedback and #2 was to remove all artificial sweeteners from my diet. If I accidentally eat an artificial sweetener of any kind, I can feel my the migraine coming on. I can't say enough about biofeedback. I didn't want to take the heavy painkillers the doctors were prescribing and it is an alternative choice that works. I was fortunate enough to have a doctor who had been taken part in a study at NIH. It worked for me and you might want to try it.

      There is always the possibility that Factor II is causing spontaneous clotting in various places in your body. I had three heart attacks within 24 hours and it all occurred in the veins in the lower left ventricle. When you think heart attack, you think of valves and arteries being clogged, but with Factor II it can happen in the veins.

      One last thing. Have your children checked. My mom has it and passed it on to at least three of her seven children. It is very important to know if they have it, so you can prevent them from being impacted. You can live a long and healthy life. Just remember, knowledge is power, so learn as much as you can.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Laury, I too have Factor II. I got the test for it after my 27yr old brother had a stroke and was found to have Factor II and a small hole in his heart that caused the clot. I already had 2 children by then so I don't know what an OB will require when you get pregnant other than taking you off asprin. I'm sure that when you are out of school and ready to have kids everything will be fine. Knowing that you are at risk will help you and your doctor plan the best care and pregnancy for you. Good luck!

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Laury, I too have Factor II. I got the test for it after my 27yr old brother had a stroke and was found to have Factor II and a small hole in his heart that caused the clot. I already had 2 children by then so I don't know what an OB will require when you get pregnant other than taking you off asprin. I'm sure that when you are out of school and ready to have kids everything will be fine. Knowing that you are at risk will help you and your doctor plan the best care and pregnancy for you. Good luck!

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      SharronMirikitani 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Laury,

      I am so sorry to hear you had to go through all of that. The good news is you survived and you discovered it early. The comment about the herbal supplements is very interesting. A lot of people don't realize that diet can thicken or thin your blood as well. It can also cause dramatic changes in your coumadin levels. I had to go searching for online for information on what foods thickened or thinned your blood. I hope one day to write an article on this for Squidoo, or even add it to this article. The good news is you can have children when you have Factor II. I had four children before I knew I had Factor II and I had healthy children. Factor II is genetic, so it can be passed on. It sounds like you were on blood thinners for a short period of time. I am surprised they didn't keep you on them. Watch your diet carefully and always let your doctor know if you decide to take any supplements. Thank you for sharing your experience. I wish you well. ~ Sharron

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      I am 24 years old and almost 2 years ago I had a stroke. The event happened on a sunday morning as I was taking an exam online. I had been feeling odd the past week, the only severe symptoms was a massive headache, some small nose bleeds and nausea in the mornings. I had associated this all with stress and never saw what was coming. That morning I went to make a snack in the kitchen and i was disoriented, I kept re-heating my food in the microwave until it was burnt to a crisp because every time the microwave would ding I had forgotten if I even cooked it in the first place. This started to scare me, so I went to find my phone to call my mom. As I was walking towards my room my body began to shut down, my arms went first than my legs, I felt myself going down so I tried to scream out for help but instead fell into a seizure and went unconscious. I woke up on the floor, I had no memory recollection what-so-ever leading up to that. I had no idea why I was on the floor, I didn't remember anything about the kitchen. I was still extremely disoriented so I decided to go to my bed and sleep it off. I went to bed and woke up again when a roommate came home, the only thing I remembered was the actual stroke and screamed for him because I could not remember anything else, I couldn't remember my morning, night before, or anything that occurred that week. I called my mother who told me to go to the hospital. At first I was resistant because I did not have insurance at the time and I was scared of a big bill only to find out it was nothing. I did go, and after some scans they at first thought it was a brain tumor. After some more tests they realized it was a clot, I was in the ICU for 4 days and the main hospital for 3.

      The cause, Factor II gene mutation. My blood hyper coagulates, they told me it was because of my birth control and with my blood mutation that caused the clot. The clot formed in my brain, it didn't travel up. I was on birth control for three years prior to this incident. Just a week before my preliminary symptoms I started taking herbal medicine for anxiety, the 3 main ingredients were valerian, holy basil and st. johns wart, which are all large blood thickeners. I truly believe those herbs were the cause probably added on top of the birth control.

      I was on warfarin (coumadin) for 6 months, I also had a hard time regulating my levels. I also had an odd side effect where I was constantly losing hair, and the hair was thinning.

      I'm really glad this site is up, it's reassuring to read other peoples experiences and testimonies.

      I had a question, anyone with factor II have any difficulties with pregnancy? I do want to start my own family one day but I am concerned because of the difficulties I had read about.

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      SharronMirikitani 5 years ago

      @anonymous: It is a genetic mutation which means it can be passed to future generations. I personally believe all family members should be tested. My mom is 81 and just got tested and yes, she has Factor II. A number of her grandchildren have Factor II. Better safe than sorry.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      I am almost 64 I had DVT when I was 24 but never was tested for factor II, I have had DVT more time than I can remember, 3 years ago I had a knee replacement got DVT again and spent a month in the hospital. After that my doctor sent me to get a DNA test and came back I had Factor II. Last week my sister's son got PE and was in ICU for a week they tested him right away and he also had factor II. How important is it for my other sister and brother to be tested, we know it can be passed to our children with my nephew getting factor II, but can they pass it to our grandchildren. I really don't want anyone going through what I have been through these past 40 years

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      SharronMirikitani 6 years ago

      @anonymous: I did a Google search and can't locate this book anywhere. Thank you for telling me about the broken link. I will remove the link. I am getting ready to write a comprehensive article on foods the thin or clot your blood. Diet has a huge impact on your blood clotting time. I am going vacation, so it will be more than a month before I get the article written. Ask questions any time.

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      i would like to read the book you listed - "blood coagulation disorders" but the link appears to be broken. Do you have an alternate site? My wife was recently diagnosed with factor II & I want to educate myself.

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      SharronMirikitani 6 years ago

      @anonymous: Sitting is the worst thing possible for DVT. I remember when the news hit about someone dying after a long flight because of DVT. Check with your doctor and read as much as you can on the topic. Personally, I believe walking is the best exercise you can do. #1 is keep up your spirits.... NEVER give up and do nothing. #2 Educate yourself and learn as much as you can. Best wishes. ~Sharron

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      SharronMirikitani 6 years ago

      @anonymous: Sitting is the worst thing possible for DVT. I remember when the news hit about someone dying after a long flight because of DVT. Check with your doctor and read as much as you can on the topic. Personally, I believe walking is the best exercise you can do. #1 is keep up your spirits.... NEVER give up and do nothing. #2 Educate yourself and learn as much as you can. Best wishes. ~Sharron

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      I have DVT (2weeks) now. A few of my family members have factor II. I have informed my doctor of this but she had a factor V test ran instead...will this test need to be rerun as a factor II? Also, should I be seeing a specialist instead of my family doctor? I am not over weight, never smoked, in don't drink, and I do exercise. What exercises can I do now with a DVT? I don't want to gain weight.

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      SharronMirikitani 6 years ago

      @lifter1: Thank you for sharing your incredible story. It is so important that people understand this hidden killer. I wish you well.

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      SharronMirikitani 6 years ago

      @anonymous: Patty,

      Thank you so much for sharing your story. Knowledge is power and when you share your knowledge, you empower others. Thank you! Yes, I have had a long history of migraines and even seizures, so that made me think about a lifetime of guessing by specialists as to why I had them from childhood until I was in my 30's. I too periodically have problems with Coumadin and getting the levels to be stable. I watch my diet and know what affects the levels and recently, I have had problems of my blood being too think. The new drug is very promising. I will definitely look into it. I have found that you need to fight for your own wellness. Never give up. If you don't feel right, keep pursuing and answer. Only you live in your skin and "only" you can determine when you just are not feeling 100%. I wish you all the best, and thanks again for sharing so much information.

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      I had a scary incredible pain in my chest 2 years ago while driving on a busy 5 lane interstate and pulled over when I saw a police officer who then called the paramedics. I went to a very prominent hospital and stayed in observation one night and had a nuclear heart test which was fine. Then a year later I had a hot red spot on my calf and was diagnosed with a DVT in the popliteal vein (behind the knee). Luckily, I got there just as the clot was forming and the damage was minimal but with further testing found I had the Factor V Leiden and Factor II prothrombin gene mutation. With this came many more blood tests which were all normal. But the doctors say I probably had a pulmonary embolism back with the first episode while driving. I have had previous chest pains and was a nurse at a hospital with a cardiologist that took care of my father (who had a quintuple bypass at 7 yrs. old.) He ordered my first nuclear stress test with the treadmill test too. But nothing was found that was 5 years ago. Every doctor told me they were panic attacks all these years even with the left arm pain and nausea I've had over the last 20 years. I am 50 now and wished someone had diagnosed me earlier and also my father who died at 67 years old-maybe he could have been spared. I am seeing a hematologist who is considered one of the best in the area now and he told me of a new drug-approved in London-but not here in the US called Praudaxa that works like Coumadin but no diet restrictions or other restrictions and is well tolerated and you don't have to be tested so often for INR's etc. But my insurance doesn't cover it for this condition-just A-fib. I am having sever fluctuations with my Coumadin and cannot get it regulated whether it be my diet, medications, or vitamin supplements-plus I'm worried about when its too low I am not really covered for clotting. Some of you may be able to get this drug if you have problems with Coumadin-my doctor says some people don't absorb it well-so I hope this helps. Also-I am wondering if anyone else has problems with migraines? I have left sided facial pain and headaches that have been debilitating but eased up with the Coumadin-no doctor believes that it would help headaches-but blood clots in the brain could cause headaches if they were small enough not to cause other problems. I also have muscle pain and back pain which the doctors say is fibromyalgia but this new doctor says its not. What have any of you experienced with this?

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      JennyChanaa 7 years ago

      I was in my early 20's when my left leg became swollen,red,warm, and very painful. I went straight to the ER and ended up staying in the ICU for the next month and a half. It ended up that I had a DVT from my toes to my belly button on my left side. I almost died and I almost lost my leg...but thankfully I went to the ER in time. It turns out that both of my parents have this gene mutation...so I have Homozygous Prothrombin gene mutation.Factor 2..I was also on birth control at the time of my clot...I had a recurrent clot in my left arm and was put back in the hospital for another few weeks..They gave me a stint in one of my veins. I was put on Lovenox and Heparin shots for years....and then 3 years later I started taking Depo-Provera and I developed yet another DVT...and then I was put on more aggressive blood thinning shots..I got an IUD and that solved my birth control situation and I have not had a DVT since. .Eventually I was put on Coumadin for a year or two and that worked..but I took myself off of Coumadin...I have not had any DVT's since...Now I have chronic pain from the vascular problems I encountered from the clot..I have varicose veins that have become my main vein in my leg.The clot went through my vena cava vein.My vascular surgeon told me there is nothing they can do..so I just do what I can do handle my pain..I have had phlebitis many times...from my lower leg to my abdomen. I get nerve blocks in my back to prevent the pain that I suffer from chronically. I do not know if I will be able to have children...I know their is a big risk of my life if I was to become pregnant...So, I will have to assess the risks when that time comes.

      My parents and brother were tested and all just have one gene....my uncle recently lost part of his leg due to a blood clot..and he was tested for the gene mutation i have but he does not have it. I am now in my early 30's and am always looking for people who have what I have...maybe that can share a similar experience...I also learned tonight from doing research learned what my mutation means...and am always on the look out for new information...so if you have any to share..please email me.

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      Wow!

      I like your lens, very useful and inspiring. thank you.

      -----------------------------

      Regeasy Cleaner Review

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      lifter1 7 years ago

      I had a heart attack 2 years ago at the age of 38. I was a bodybuilder and doing squats at the time it happened. I had a massive clot in my right coronary artery. I was stupid and did not go to the hospital until 6 hours later. I thought I had just pushed myself too hard and would feel better with some rest. They used aspiration to suck out the clot and after that my artery was wide open. I had no sign of atherosclerosis anywhere and the doc wanted to put a stent in, I don't know why, but did not have one wide enough to fit my artery.

      The heart attack was bad enough that I now have a defibrillator/pacemaker because 1 month after the attack I went into a dangerous tachycardia and passed out. I would have died if I hadn't had my wife call 911. The paramedics had just arrived when I passed out. They had to shock me 2x to get my heart going again. SO now I have a "box" in my chest as my little girls call it,lol.

      My ejection fraction is just 28%. I wish I had known about this genetic disorder. It's a shame that we can't routinely test people for things like this, I guess the cost on the medical system would be too high. I was diagnosed with the prothromibin mutation(factor 2) around the same time I got the defibrillator implanted. I now take coumadin and haven't had any other incident of clot.

      I think if anyone in your family has had this happen at a young age like me that you need to have yourself checked for this. My father had himself tested and he was negative but my mom is one of those " I don't want to know" people and hasn't been tested yet. Obviously she has it. I am heterozygous.

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      anonymous 9 years ago

      Thanks for the resource you've put out here! I have both, Factor II and Factor V Leiden (as does one of my brothers, 1 brother has FII), and my hematologist is having a very challenging time getting my clotting to reverse, in fact, my clots have been continuing to form. I'm seeking help from any medical professional that might be able to point me in the right direction for finding someone who might be able to help us find at least a control therapy. I was on coumadin with a PT/INR range of 2.5 to 3.0 and that wasn't working (though I'm confident that with my new hematologist we will revisit this and up my range to 3 ). I'm on 10mg of Lovenox BID now, but do not want to do this for the rest of my life. I'm willing to participate in clinical studies, trials, etc.

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      anonymous 9 years ago

      Hi. I was just wondering if a Factor II discussion forum exists. I can find lots of info. on Factor V Leiden but not Factor II. I am 37 and had a heart attack a few weeks ago, followed by a diagnosis of Factor II...Can anyone point me in the right direction as far as resources or message boards/groups on the net? Thanks so much!

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      ChristinasFavs 9 years ago

      Thanks for this lens. I'm going to share it with my sister. She has Factor II and I have MTHFR and Anti-Cardio Lipin. We realized it after I had a stillborn loss as a result of it and then my sister was diagnosed with Factor II when she was pregnant with her third child. She delivered early at 30 weeks and her daughter is 5 years old now and doing fine. I have created a lens titled Stillborn Loss about my daughter Mia.

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      anonymous 9 years ago

      www.lifeafterdvt.forumotion.com

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      euonymous 9 years ago

      This is a great lens. Thank you for putting it together. In my family at least 3 out of 4 siblings have the Factor V Leiden mutation. I'd never heard about Factor II Leiden before. There isn't a lot of helpful information out there. My two sisters have both had their gall bladders removed, one is permanently on coumadin, and I had a blood clot in one leg about a decade ago after a fall skiing but no problems since then. When my doctor had me tested, she said that she did the blood test on anyone who had a clot and in her years as a doctor I was the first person who tested positive. (Great, huh?) Then the rest of my family was tested and we started to learn more. I'd love to see more on Factor V and how the two differ.

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      Brent_S 10 years ago

      I'm glad you found out about this for your families sake. Maybe others here will find this could be them. It's always good supporting Charity too. Together We Can Change The World