ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Differences Between Cold, Seasonal Flu & H1N1 Symptoms

Updated on October 18, 2014

Cold, Seasonal Flu and H1N1 Symptoms

The symptoms for the common cold and the seasonal flu are similar. Learn how to tell the difference between Cold, Seasonal Flu and H1N1 (Swine Flu) Symptoms. Each symptom type is broken down below.

Sudden Symptoms

  • Cold symptoms tend to develop over a few days.
  • Symptoms tend to develop over a few days and include flushed face, loss of appetite, dizziness and/or vomiting/nausea. Symptoms usually last 4-7 days, depending on the individual. Diarrhea is common.
  • H1N1 has a rapid onset within 3-6 hours. H1N1 hits hard and includes sudden symptoms like high fever, aches and pains. Symptoms usually last 4-7 days, depending on the individual. Diarrhea is common.

Symptom: Aches

  • Slight body aches and pains can be part of a cold.
  • Moderate body aches are common with the seasonal flu.
  • Severe aches and pains are common with H1N1.

Symptom: Chest Discomfort

  • Chest discomfort is mild to moderate with a cold.
  • Chest discomfort is moderate with the seasonal flu. If it turns severe seek medical attention immediately!
  • Chest discomfort is often severe with H1N1.

Symptom: Chills

  • Chills are uncommon with a cold.
  • Chills are mild to moderate with the seasonal flu.
  • 60% of people who have H1N1 experience chills.

Symptom: Coughing

  • A hacking, productive (mucus-producing) cough is often present with a cold.
  • A dry and hacking cough is often present with the seasonal flu.
  • A non-productive (non-mucus producing) cough is usually present with H1N1.

Symptom: Fever

  • Fever is rare with a cold.
  • Fever is common with the seasonal flu.
  • Fever is usually present with H1N1 in up to 80% of all flu cases. A temperature of 101°

Symptom: Headache

  • A headache is fairly uncommon with a cold.
  • A headache is fairly common with the seasonal flu.
  • A headache is very common with H1N1 and present in 80% of cases.

Symptom: Sneezing

  • Sneezing is commonly present with a cold
  • Sneezing is commonly present with the seasonal flu.
  • Sneezing is not common with H1N1.

Symptom: Sore Throat

  • Sore throat is commonly present with a cold.
  • Sore throat is commonly present with the seasonal flu.
  • Sore throat is not common with H1N1.

Symptom: Stuffy Nose

  • Stuffy nose is commonly present with a cold and typically resolves spontaneously within a week.
  • A runny nose is commonly present with the seasonal flu.
  • Stuffy nose is not common with H1N1.

Symptom: Tiredness

  • Tiredness is fairly mild with a cold.
  • Tiredness is moderate and more likely referred to as a lack of energy with the seasonal flu.
  • Tiredness is moderate to severe with H1N1.

Know What to Do About the Flu - From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

FLU.gov

     One-stop access to U.S. Government H1N1, avian and pandemic flu information.

Have you or a loved one had H1N1?

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • OUTFOXprevention1 profile image

      OUTFOXprevention1 6 years ago

      Great lens. Please update if the predicted outbreak happens within the year!

    • Charlino99 profile image

      Tonie Cook 7 years ago from USA

      Excellent lens - simple, to the point, and very helpful. Blessed.

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      Both my dad and my best friend came down and were tested for the H1N1 virus. Since neitner of them is very old, or very young, or sickly it didn't hit them hard.

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      A friend of mine is in the hospital fighting for his life. He started out with a sore throat and extreme weakness. He was swabbed twice for H1N1 and both times had a negative result. Within a few short days he was taken to the emergency room with breathing difficulties. He had a fever anywhere from 99-103. Never fever free. He has been on a vent for over a week and his new diagnosis was pneumonia secondary to H1N1!

    working