ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Hearing Aids are for Old People, What Else Might I Use?

Updated on February 7, 2016

Hearing loss is the third most common chronic illness

Hearing loss is the third most common chronic illness in older adults today, topped only by hypertension and arthritis, and it results in significant disability. Hearing impairment greatly hinders communication, impeding the ability to transmit health and nursing care treatment information. Untreated hearing loss also affects a person’s cognitive status, functional status, social integration, and interactions with family.

Amplification offers many benefits. Hearing aids improve audiometry scores on average by 15-20 decibels (dB) and improve hearing handicap up to 55%.

This improves speech understanding, especially in one-on-one situations. When persons are able to hear better and communicate more effectively, they experience less depression, anxiety, fear, and isolation. Persons who adopt hearing aids exhibit higher functional ability scores than those who do not. Recent research also demonstrates the potential to increase cognition scores over time in hearing aid wearers, though this recent research needs to be validated.

A primary complaint of hearing aid wearers, is that they can hear just fine, but they cannot understand what is being said. This stems from difficulties in frequency discrimination and causes difficulties in differentiating certain consonant sounds. For example, one may confuse words such as mash and mast or cash and cap. This can frustrate not only the individual but also their family and others with whom they communicate. Many older persons do not realize they have a hearing problem, due to the slow progression of loss. To those with good hearing, the following spoken sentences are easy to understand “Take one tablet three times a day until the medication is gone. Do not skip any doses and do not double up any doses,” But to those with a mild hearing loss similar to what many persons experience as they age, the sentences would sound like: “ a e one able ree imes a day un il e medica ion is gone. Do no ski any do e and do no double u any do e .”

Decibel

dec·i·bel

ˈdesəˌbel,ˈdesəˌbəl/

noun

a unit used to measure the intensity of a sound or the power level of an electrical signal by comparing it with a given level on a logarithmic scale.

(in general use) a degree of loudness.

"his voice went up several decibels"

What is a Decibel?

According to Dictionary.com, a decibel is a unit used to express the intensity of a sound wave, equal to 20 times the common logarithm of the ratio of the pressure produced by the sound wave to a reference pressure. This snippet of a decibel chart fr
According to Dictionary.com, a decibel is a unit used to express the intensity of a sound wave, equal to 20 times the common logarithm of the ratio of the pressure produced by the sound wave to a reference pressure. This snippet of a decibel chart fr

Hearing Loss Simulation Using the Flintstones Cartoon

Hearing loss affects both men and women of all ages

All ethnic groups are affected by the hearing loss associated with aging, though certain diseases can be more prevalent in one group than another, For people under the age of 65, hearing loss is often associated with exposure to hazardous noise levels at work or leisure — for instance, listening to loud music through headphones or at a concert, or working on the farm around loud mechanical equipment.

One of the most devastating things about hearing loss is that it interferes with the ability to communicate. Patients often realize that they’re not hearing as well as they used to; they’ll say, ‘I’m asking people to repeat themselves, and they’re getting annoyed, or everyone seems to be mumbling. It is important to treat hearing loss because otherwise persons begin to get isolated and that lack of interaction can impair a number of body systems.

Your Cochlear When it is Damaged

Your cochlea has tiny hairs that look like the image on the left when working well. After they get damaged they begin to look like the image on the right. They become broken or bent and can no longer detect sound as well, if at all.
Your cochlea has tiny hairs that look like the image on the left when working well. After they get damaged they begin to look like the image on the right. They become broken or bent and can no longer detect sound as well, if at all. | Source

How Many People Do You Know?

How many people do you know who have a hearing loss?

See results

How Many Have Hearing Aids?

How many people that you know who have hearing problems have and use hearing aids?

See results

So I've Heard of Hearing Aids, But What Else Is There?

"I've heard about hearing aids, and frankly I've heard my share of negatives. Many of my friends just don't wear them and are not satisfied, so why spend the money. Are there other alternatives that might not put me in the "old" category if I wear them?"

The statement above is a frequent one that I hear other say. Sometimes people are looking for alternatives other times they are not. But there are alternatives to hearing aids today. They may be more cost effective too. Let's review some of the alternatives.

Hearables are the combination of two technologies, hearing aids and consumer electronics. Some of the hearables are devices that can be added to hearing aids or used without hearing aids. Some of the hearables are apps that are combined with your Smart Phone to enhance audibility. Typically hearables are more accepted by consumers because others are using them for a variety of reasons.

Hearables cannot replace hearing aids, but do have a role in the marketplace. Hearables may be the first step towards amplification for some or may enhance the hearing aid's ability to help a person perceive sound. Some examples include

  • Smartphone Based Apps
  • Made for iPhone hearing aids/devices
  • Personal Sound Amplification (i.e. Pocket Talker)

Modified from Audiology Today
Modified from Audiology Today

Made for iPhone Hearing Aids

Based on a new Bluetooth technology designed by Apple, these advanced hearing aids provide outstanding sound quality, offer many helpful new features, and couldn’t be easier to set up and use.
Based on a new Bluetooth technology designed by Apple, these advanced hearing aids provide outstanding sound quality, offer many helpful new features, and couldn’t be easier to set up and use. | Source

Personal Amplifiers

Sound World Solutions CS50+ Personal Sound Amplifier - Right Ear SKU: HC-CS50+R
Sound World Solutions CS50+ Personal Sound Amplifier - Right Ear SKU: HC-CS50+R | Source
Sound World Solutions CS50+ Personal Sound Amplifier - Right Ear SKU: HC-CS50+R being used in a restaurant setting
Sound World Solutions CS50+ Personal Sound Amplifier - Right Ear SKU: HC-CS50+R being used in a restaurant setting
Etymotic BEAN Bronze Single Quiet Sound Amplifier SKU: HC-QSA-BZ
Etymotic BEAN Bronze Single Quiet Sound Amplifier SKU: HC-QSA-BZ | Source
Source
Williams Sound Pocketalker 2.0 Personal Amplifier SKU: WS-PKT2.0
Williams Sound Pocketalker 2.0 Personal Amplifier SKU: WS-PKT2.0 | Source

iHear Personal Listening Device Use

How to Use Personal Listening Devices

The key to any personal listening device is to be a good consumer. Make sure you have a trial period and/or a warranty so that you can return if you do not like it. Make your first purchase on the lower cost end and work your way up if you have to. Personal listening devices are a "first" step towards a hearing aid. They amplify all noises and may or may not be helpful for you. A hearing aid can be programmed for your hearing loss and will be more specific.

Saying all of this is fine, but also keep in mind.

1. The inner workings of your ear are damaged. A hearing aid or personal listening device does not fix that, it only helps it out by adding a louder sound environment.

2. You will have to work at wearing the devices and you will still need to work to understand speech well.

3. Tell people about your hearing loss, let them know how they can help you. For example, I can hear better when you do not cover your mouth with your hand when you talk.

4. Encourage others to face you when they talk to you.

5. Pick good areas when you want to talk with others. Very loud restaurants are not the best option, chose a quieter location when possible.

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No comments yet.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)