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Homeopathic remedies for fertility

Updated on September 16, 2013
Homeopathic remedies have been sold for centuries as natural cures.
Homeopathic remedies have been sold for centuries as natural cures. | Source

When I was at one of my reflexology appointments, my reflexologist asked if I had used any homeopathic remedies in my quest to conceive.
To be honest, I had never considered it, as I’m still not convinced it actually works. I am a sceptic by nature, but while trying to conceive at the age of 41, with the odds stacked somewhat against me (low ovarian reserve and whatnot), I thought, ‘nothing ventured, nothing gained.’

Does it work?

Modern science still does not support homeopathy, calling it a pseudoscience. It claims there is no real evidence that it works at all.

Unfortunately, homeopathy has failed to provide any real, clinical proof that it does work, yet despite this, thousands of people are still turning to it as an alternative remedy to chemicals.


Supposed ‘cures’ cannot be proved, and are deemed to have been the body healing itself.

But it can...

Several years ago, I picked up a terrible rash in my groin after visiting a spa. I had never seen anything like it: my groin area and tops of my thighs were covered in what looked like tiny, hard pimples. I did some research online, and found that what I had was something called Molluscum Contagiosum. After much reading and freaking out, I went to a chemist who told me to try homeopathy. She said she knew a homeopathic chemist who had treated it, with some success.

I immediately went off to the homeopath, albeit with scepticism, and she said she had treated many children for the virus.
In my online reading I had learned that it was extremely hard to get rid of Molluscum Contagiosum, and that it could take up to 18 months for the virus to disappear. But, after about a week of taking the tiny sugar-drops under my tongue, the rash started to disappear.

Was it the homeopathic remedy that worked, or did it disappear on its own? I have no idea. All I know is that the rash disappeared, and for that I was grateful.

For this reason, when my reflexologist suggested homeopathic remedies for fertility, I was willing to drop the scepticism for once.

What is homeopathy?

It is an alternative healing practice, working on the principle of ‘like cures like’. In other words, that which can cause in illness in a healthy person can cure the illness in an unhealthy person.

It uses plant, mineral, animal and synthetic substances, diluted up to thousands of times over, in distilled water or alcohol.
In homeopathy, the more a substance is diluted, the better it is said to actually work.

Homeopathy has been used for centuries and can perhaps be recorded as far back as 400BC, when Hippocrates used very small doses of mandrake root – which, when used in large quantities, causes mania – to treat mania.

In the 16th century, the father of Pharmacology, Paracelsus, said that ‘what makes a man ill also cures him.

In the 18th century, Samuel Hahnemann gave homeopathy its name and did more research into how it works.

It has been used as an alternative medicine ever since, despite no real evidence being given that it actually works on its own.

Its popularity was revived in the United States in the 1970s, and is continued to be used by hundreds of thousands of people world-wide.

Homeopathy for fertility

Firstly, it has to be said that homeopathy is in no way a cure for infertility. It is supposed to bring the body back into balance, as with things like acupuncture or reflexology, which encourages natural conception.

A good homeopath will treat you ‘as a whole’, again, like an acupuncturist or reflexologist would. They will ask for your medical history, as well as your partner’s.
All sort of things will be taken into account, including your lifestyle, sleeping patterns, whether you are hot or cold all the time and so on.
Remember that homeopathy is supposed to treat women and men.

Homeopathy works at restoring balance to the reproductive systems, in women and men.

  • It claims to help with emotional blockages regarding fertility.
  • It can help with the stress related to fertility or infertility.
  • It can assist with the side effects of other fertility treatments.

When to take homeopathic remedies

Ideally, up to half an hour before eating or drinking, on an empty stomach.
This is because homeopathic remedies are highly diluted and are therefore more sensitive to other substances from food or drink, in the mouth.

It is best to avoid strong-tasting substances like onion, garlic, coffee or even a mint, when using homeopathic remedies.
Smoking should be avoided at all costs too. (It should be avoided anyway, regardless of taking homeopathic remedies!)

Homeopathic remedies come in the form of tablets, liquids or pellets, and should be placed under the tongue, where they will dissolve and be easily absorbed into the system.

Which remedies to use

In women:

  • One of the more famous homeopathic ‘remedies’ for fertility is Agnus Castus (or Vitex). It is used to lower FSH (Follicle-stimulating hormone) levels in women. (See my article on FSH levels here)
  • Sepia 6c is for irregular, or absent, ovulation
  • Sabina 6c is for women who suffer from miscarriages
  • Aurum is for a better sex drive
  • Phosphorus is for treating stress that is related to infertility
  • Silica boosts the immune system
  • Lycopodium is for women who suffer from a dry vagina and/or from tenderness in the abdomen


In Men:

  • Sepia 6c is for treating a lower sex drive
  • Medorrhinum is for impotence
  • Lycopodium is used for erectile dysfunction issues

Source

Also from Amazon, Agnus Castus Vitex, and other remedies

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    • naturman profile image

      Michael Roberts 

      3 years ago from UK

      Are there any homeopathic remedies for breathing problems ?

    working

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