ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

How often should a gas permeable lens be replaced?

Updated on December 20, 2010

When should you replace a gas permeable lens

There are fewer and fewer gas permeable lens wearers these days but that still doesn't mean gas perm lenses are outdated. But there's a chance that your gas permeable lenses are outdated or deposited or significantly scratched.

How long you keep your gas perm lenses varies from one person to another but my guess is many people keep some old ones laying around just in case and that might be ok. These lenses are pretty durable but still need care when you are using them.

If you wear the older type hard lens then you might even keep yours even longer but that's not the case for most people. It's pretty rare to find someone wearing the old type hard lens called PMMA. Those aren't gas permeable which is why they aren't prescribed by doctors today.

Here are a couple of things to think about when deciding to replace your lenses:

  • If your prescription changed enough to make a difference.
  • If the doctor says the lenses should not be worn due to a defect like an edge is broken, or if the lenses are so deposited they cannot be cleaned or polished
  • Heavy scratches can effect the performance of how well the lens "wets" and perhaps feels.
  • The lens fit is not proper and thus may cause some cornea abrasion or other potential problem.

Standard gas permeable lenses may last years but some of the newer lens treatments may eventually breakdown so the lens may not perform as intended. There is a lens approved for overnight wear of up to 30 days that goes through a special process to make it more permeable to oxygen. This is a lens material manufactured by Menicon. If you have that lens you may be able to have that lens retreated if it's not scratched significantly.

Bottom line for replacing should be determined by your eye care professional but if the lens is bothersome or you suspect a problem which is unexplained you should check with your doctor.

But to answer the question about how long these lenses could last? They could last years if treated and cleaned well.


There is a special type of gas permeable lens used in orthokeratology and the replacement schedule for that lens may be more frequent. Some doctors who use these lenses may recommend annual replacement due to a couple of factors. The inner curves are important for the effect and could wear enough to change how a person sees. Also, buildup of protein could compromise the health of the eye and cause corneal damage.

A very important factor in how long any of these gas permeable lenses last is how well they are treated.

Here are a couple of things to remember about caring for your gas permeable lenses:

  • Rub the lenses with the proper gas permeable lens solution. There are a couple of brands like Boston, Optimum and Alcon's Optifree GP solution. You may find some generic labels as well. Other solutions that can be used are Clear Care or Sauflon. Be sure to clean the inner most part of the lens where a large fingertip may not reach.
  • If you drop your lens on a hard surface check the edges of the lens by holding the lens up towards a light and look for chips. You can also run your finger gently around the edge to feel for a chip.
  • When holding the lens up to a light also check for any discoloration of the lens. If you see a whitish or slight brownish deposit then your lens should be cleaned further and probably should be taken to your eye care providers office. The lens may need polishing or a special solution used for removing deposits
  • If the lens falls on a hard surface be careful not to slide the lens over the surface. That might scratch the edges of the lens and make it uncomfortable.

When in doubt you should contact your eye care providers office. It's possible there is a problem with the gas permeable lens if you don't see clearly or it could be your eye that's affected.

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • profile image

      Fred 

      2 years ago

      To summarize this piece, the answer is 'they might last years if you look after them, but ask your eyecare professional'.

    • profile image

      Anil 

      6 years ago

      Thank you so much for sharing this information.

      http://www.therightcontact.com

    • profile image

      ajay w david 

      6 years ago

      am also get the idea from google..

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)