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Symptoms of Vitamin D Deficiency and How to Treat It

Updated on September 29, 2014

What is vitamin D?

Vitamin D is an essential vitamin that our body needs.  Because it is not found in many foods, it’s very easy to get vitamin D deficit.  Usually our body will make enough of it from the sun.   That’s right; our bodies create vitamin D naturally from the UV rays of the sun.  The problem is most of us don’t get out as often as we should.  This is a very large factor that contributes to vitamin D deficiency.

How do you know if you are vitamin D deficit?

The following symptoms are associated with mild vitamin D deficiency; loss of appetite, insomnia, weight loss and diarrhea.  It is possible to have more severe symptoms like low immunity, depression, muscle pain, fatigue and fragile bones.  The severe symptoms can lead to rickets and osteomalacia.

Food sources of Vitamin D!
Food sources of Vitamin D!

How do you treat vitamin D deficiency?

The first thing anyone experiencing the above symptoms should do is see their doctor.  They will do a blood test that can determine if not having enough vitamin D is your problem, and they will be able to discuss further treatment options.

There are ways that you can help prevent or even treat mild symptoms however.  One way is to eat more foods that have vitamin D such as cheese, beef liver, fish oil, fish and egg yolk.  These foods will help boost the vitamin D in your system.  Vitamin D is also added to milk.

Of course the easiest way to get more vitamin D is to get out into the sun more often.  Putting on shorts and a tank top and going out into the midday sun for 10 to 15 minutes will produce enough vitamin D in most cases.  However, in cold climates this is not always practical.

The most efficient way to get your vitamin D levels up is to take a vitamin D supplement.  Supplements come in two forms, vitamin D2 and D3.  Some studies have shown that Vitamin D3 supplements are the better and more efficient of the two, but other scientists say D2 is just as efficient.  So when it comes to choosing a vitamin D supplement, you just have to choose which one is right for you.

Where can I find vitamin D supplements?

For the best deals, you will want to get vitamin D supplements on the internet.  Always keep your safety in mind, and make sure that before you buy them that you are shopping from a legitimate vendor.  The supplements are also available at your local drug store.

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      AK 5 years ago

      I had heart rate of 150+ and high blood pressure that lasted for a couple of hours, bad enough to land me in the ER. My labs, EKG with exception of HR and BP were at borderline or normal levels. My RDW is somewhat elevated making me think that my B12 level is low. So off my doctor I went. He drew blood for B12 and Vit D levels plus I gave a urine sample for VMA testing to rule out another condition called pheochromocytoma (unusual swing in BP). My VMA level were normal but my Vit D has bottomed out - my level read 6ng/ml (30-100ng/ml are the normal levels) and my B12 was below 400 requiring an instant dose of B12 injection. My doctor explained why I am always tired and constantly having muscle pains. So, it's better to get checked up at least during the cold months when these levels (Vit D) tend to get low or depleted. I'm on my revovery as I have to supplement my self with a "boat load" of Vit D for the next 6 months (as quoted by my MD).

    • levicolemagic profile image
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      Levi Henley 7 years ago from Las Vegas, NV

      There are a number of vitamins that contribute to heart health. Vitamin D deficiencies have been linked to high blood pressure, but constant tachycardia (faster than normal pulse) can be caused from a multitude of ailments including a lack of B vitamins. If your pulse is constantly above 100 BPM then you should consult your doctor. There could be an underlying health issue, or it could be a normal variant. It's better safe than sorry.

    • profile image

      Ron 7 years ago

      Whether a constantly high pulse(100+) is one of the symptoms of vitamin D deficiency?

      Ron

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