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Facts About Your Blood Type

Updated on December 6, 2020
Pamela99 profile image

After 22 years as an RN, I now write about medical issues and new medical advances. Diet, exercise, treatment, and lifestyle are important.

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Blood Types

A blood type or blood group is a classification of your blood based on the absence or presence of antibodies and your inherited antigenic substances that live on the surface of your red blood cells (RBC). The inherited substances may be carbohydrates, proteins, glycolipids or glycoproteins, which depends on your blood group system. Your inherited blood type is a contribution from both parents. A total of 36 human blood group systems and 346 antigens are recognized by the International Society of Blood Transfusions (ISBT).

In 1900, Karl Landsteiner, an Austrian physician, was working at the Pathological-Anatomical Institute located at the University of Vienna when he discovered that blood sera from various people would clump together (agglutinate) when mixed in test tubes. This was the first discovery of any variation in blood types.

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Blood Type Groups

The most important blood group systems are the ABO and the Rh. This grouping tells us if someone is (A, B, AB or O) and if you are either positive or negative. These factors are very important in blood transfusions.

Our red blood cells have a protein called the Rh factor on the surface of the red blood cell. If you have Rh positive blood it means you have the Rh protein. If you have Rh negative you simply do not have the protein.

I have O- (type O Rh negative blood), which makes me in the universal donor group, so it means I can donate my blood to anyone without any adverse effects for them. However, I can only receive O- blood if I need a transfusion.

The world population has four blood types, which are:

  • O - O+ 37.4% of the population, O- is rare for 6.6% of the population
  • A - A+ with 35.7% of the population, A- for 6.3% of the population
  • B - B+ with 8.5% of the population, B- for 1.5% of the population
  • AB- AB+ with 3.4% of the population, AB- for 0.6% of the population

To break the blood types down a little more clearly:

  • O+ 1 in 3 people O- 1 in 15 people
  • A+ 1 in 3 people A- 1 in 16 people
  • B+ 1 in 12 people B- 1 in 67 people
  • AB+ 1 in 29 people AB- 1 in 167 people

25 Eye Opening Things Your Blood Type Says About You

Characteristics of Blood Types

Scientists do not know why there are particular characteristics associated with the different blood types.

The unique characteristics of type O blood include:

  • People with type O blood have a lower risk of coronary heart disease. This may be due to a lower cholesterol level and a protein that is linked to blood clotting.
  • People with type O are at a lower risk of getting Malaria, because if you get a mosquito bite the parasite has a tougher time in attaching to the blood cells.
  • People with type O blood have a better chance of living longer since blood clots that are sometimes in the legs typically move to the lungs more often in those people with the other 3 types of blood.
  • Women with type O blood tend to have less healthy eggs.
  • Painful open sores in the lining of the stomach or intestines that cause peptic ulcers occur more frequently with type O blood.
  • People with type O have a greater risk of death after experiencing a severe trauma.

The unique characteristics about type A, B and AB blood include:

  • People with Type A blood tend to have a higher level of cortisol, which can make dealing with stress more difficult.
  • Type 2 diabetes is more common in people with type A blood. Researchers have no explanation for this either.
  • There are more risks with each of these blood types then there are with the O blood type. People with type A are at higher risk for stomach cancer. Researchers believe this might be due to H. pylori infection as it is more common with type A blood and this bacteria causes ulcers and inflammation.
  • Memory problems are more common in people with type AB blood.
  • People with type AB blood have a higher risk of a stroke. Researchers believe this is due to the fact that their blood clots more easily.

Source

Eat Right 4 Your Type: Dr. Peter J .D'Adamo

In Conclusion

It is good to know your blood type, especially in an emergency. If you need a blood transfusion you can always get an O negative transfusion. Knowing some of the possible health problems that are associated with your blood type is also smart.

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and does not substitute for diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, prescription, and/or dietary advice from a licensed health professional. Drugs, supplements, and natural remedies may have dangerous side effects. If pregnant or nursing, consult with a qualified provider on an individual basis. Seek immediate help if you are experiencing a medical emergency.

© 2020 Pamela Oglesby

Comments

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  • Pamela99 profile imageAUTHOR

    Pamela Oglesby 

    10 months ago from Sunny Florida

    Hi Maria,

    I think you are very rare in the level of your thoughtfulness and kindness. You do have the rare AB blood type also. I am glad you leared something new about blood. Thanks for your comments.

    Love and hugs.

  • marcoujor profile image

    Maria Jordan 

    10 months ago from Jeffersonville PA

    Hi Pamela,

    I learned so much in this article - especially in the 25 eye-opening facts video. The personality traits of the various blood types are especially fascinating to me.

    My blood type happens to be 'AB-' ... perhaps the only thing rare about me!

    Thanks for this information. Hugs,Maria

  • Pamela99 profile imageAUTHOR

    Pamela Oglesby 

    11 months ago from Sunny Florida

    Hi Yves,

    I understand your concern as I am O- also. I don't really know about the volume of research on eating, but I always do researach and put up the latest data. I hope your son finds the perfect diet for him. I appreciate your comments, as always. :-)

  • Pamela99 profile imageAUTHOR

    Pamela Oglesby 

    11 months ago from Sunny Florida

    Hi Sp,

    Yes, O- is always short because they can use that blood for anyone. It is a shame they don't every type of blood on hand for any emergency. Thank you for your comments.

  • savvydating profile image

    Yves 

    11 months ago

    Interesting! I do wonder about the efficacy of eating for one's blood type. Perhaps there is something to it. I would have to research D' Adamo himself.....

    However, I do believe that certain blood types may be susceptible to specific problems. It makes sense to me. Hopefully, these issues are not set in stone or I am a 'goner' for sure. Yikes!

    AB Negative. Yep, that's me. Guess I'd better start doing crossword puzzles on a regular basis. My only hope is that my grandmother on my dad's side ( who gave me the AB blood type or some version thereof, I believe ) remained 'sharp as a tack' up until her dying day.

    Fingers crossed in my case. ;)

    I enjoyed your informative article and will definitely look into the eating book, mostly for my son's sake, who has a sensitive stomach, and who eats very clean.... but still....

    Thanks again!

  • sangre profile image

    Sp Greaney 

    11 months ago from Ireland

    It's always interesting to learn more about blood types and how they affect certain aspect of your health. O- and B- are the blood types here that the blood banks sometimes run short on. These two are listed above within the lower spectrum so now I know why.

  • Pamela99 profile imageAUTHOR

    Pamela Oglesby 

    11 months ago from Sunny Florida

    Hi Adrienne,

    The blood type of the mother and the father make a difference, especially if it is a second or third pregnancy. The doctors are very aware and they will do what it takes to avoid complications. I appreciate your comments.

  • alexadry profile image

    Adrienne Farricelli 

    11 months ago

    This was a very interesting read about blood types. Makes me regret that I keep on forgetting what blood type I have. I know it's a pretty common type. One of my relatives instead has a rare type that is difficult to get a transfusion and that could potentially cause miscarriages if a baby has an incompatible blood type.

  • Pamela99 profile imageAUTHOR

    Pamela Oglesby 

    11 months ago from Sunny Florida

    Hi Alyssa,

    I am glad you found this artice helpful.Thanks so much for your comments.

  • Alyssa Nichol profile image

    Alyssa 

    11 months ago from Ohio

    This was a fascinating article, Pamela! I had to dig out my blood donor card to verify my blood type. I enjoyed learning about the characteristics of each type. Thank you!

  • Robert Sacchi profile image

    Robert Sacchi 

    11 months ago

    You're welcome.

  • Pamela99 profile imageAUTHOR

    Pamela Oglesby 

    11 months ago from Sunny Florida

    Hi Linda,

    Reducing the risk for disease is a very good point. Thank you for reading and commenting. Stay safe and healthy

  • Pamela99 profile imageAUTHOR

    Pamela Oglesby 

    11 months ago from Sunny Florida

    Hi Robert,

    The different blood types are very interesting. Thank you for your comments..

  • AliciaC profile image

    Linda Crampton 

    11 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

    I didn't know about the higher risk of health problems associated with certain blood types. It's good to know about things like so so we can take steps to reduce the risk. Thanks for sharing the information, Pamela.

  • Robert Sacchi profile image

    Robert Sacchi 

    11 months ago

    Very interesting. It is amazing how blood type itself indicates risk or resistance to various maladies.

  • Pamela99 profile imageAUTHOR

    Pamela Oglesby 

    11 months ago from Sunny Florida

    Hi Ms Dora,

    I am glad my article makes you want to learn more about yourself. Thanks so much for reading and commenting. God Bless you

  • MsDora profile image

    Dora Weithers 

    11 months ago from The Caribbean

    Thanks, Pam. I think that I used to know my blood type. If I did, I have forgotten it. Your article makes me want to rediscover it, and what it really means for me.

  • Pamela99 profile imageAUTHOR

    Pamela Oglesby 

    11 months ago from Sunny Florida

    Hi Mel,

    Your doctor may have your blood type or if you have been hospitalized there could be a record. Another way to find out is to donate blood. Thanks for reading and commenting.

  • Mel Carriere profile image

    Mel Carriere 

    11 months ago from Snowbound and down in Northern Colorado

    Very useful and informative article. I think I am type O but I'm not really sure. How do I find out? Great work.

  • Pamela99 profile imageAUTHOR

    Pamela Oglesby 

    11 months ago from Sunny Florida

    Hi Shauna,e no idea

    You are right about giving and receiving blood. I haven't followed the dietarty advice either. I read the book a long time ago and I have no idea where it is now. LOL

    Thank you so much for your comments.

  • bravewarrior profile image

    Shauna L Bowling 

    11 months ago from Central Florida

    This is a very interesting article, Pamela. I'm type O+. My son is O-. This means he can give me blood but I can't give him blood, correct?

    I'll come back to watch the first video.

    I actually have the book you feature in the second video. I bought it years ago. However, I haven't followed its advice. I'll have to give it another look to see why I decided not to.

  • Pamela99 profile imageAUTHOR

    Pamela Oglesby 

    11 months ago from Sunny Florida

    Hi Lora,

    Thank you for sharing your experience. It sounds horrid! I am glad you found the article informative. Thank you so much for your comments.

  • Lora Hollings profile image

    Lora Hollings 

    11 months ago

    This is an information-rich article Pamela, and I certainly have learned a lot about the different blood types and health issues which seem to be more specific to them. I found the video very informative as well. I don't know my specific blood type but I do know that I have factor V Leiden and I found this out only because I had a DVT in my lower right leg that ended up as two large pulmonary embolisms that almost killed me about nine years ago.It was an experience I will never forget! I'm just glad that I was able to get to my husband before I passed out. Your excellent article certainly has motivated me to find out. I'll try the website that Bill mentioned. This is good information to have!

  • Pamela99 profile imageAUTHOR

    Pamela Oglesby 

    11 months ago from Sunny Florida

    Hi Peggy,

    I probably would have written more about the diet as it relates to blood types, but the article was getting long and I had the video. I think this is an interesting topic. I hope you learn some more about your blood type.Thank you so much for your comments. I hope you are having a lovely weekend.

  • Peggy W profile image

    Peggy Woods 

    11 months ago from Houston, Texas

    Hi Pamela,

    From the sound of it, you are lucky to have your blood type. This article is most interesting, particularly as to how it relates to illness and foods that are tolerated better depending upon blood type. I have a common one, A+. I have heard of that book in the video, but have not read it. It would be fascinating to learn more.

  • Pamela99 profile imageAUTHOR

    Pamela Oglesby 

    11 months ago from Sunny Florida

    Hi Cheryl,

    I watched the videos in the article and some other ones also. As I elp younderstand it, with type O blood you have to eat fewer carbs. You can eat meat and vegetables, so that should help you feel better. I appreciate your comments, Cheryl.

  • Cheryl E Preston profile image

    Cheryl E Preston 

    11 months ago from Roanoke

    I'm O negative.I can donate to anyone but I can't go vegan. My blood type makes me need red meat.

  • Pamela99 profile imageAUTHOR

    Pamela Oglesby 

    11 months ago from Sunny Florida

    Hi Linda,

    I am glad you like this article. I don't know if it is urgent to learn your blood type, but I think it is a good thing to know. Thank you for reading and commenting on this article.

  • lindacee profile image

    Linda Chechar 

    11 months ago from Arizona

    It's a great article about different blood types. Although I don't know my blood type. Guess I should find which type it is.

  • Pamela99 profile imageAUTHOR

    Pamela Oglesby 

    11 months ago from Sunny Florida

    Hi John,

    One of the videos talks about the best dists for various types of blood. I sure cannot imagine why your doctor would not tell you your blood type. I have never heard of such a thing.

    Thank you for all of your nice comments.

  • Pamela99 profile imageAUTHOR

    Pamela Oglesby 

    11 months ago from Sunny Florida

    Hi Linda,

    Iy is wonderful that have donated so much blood. As both you and your husband are O+, I would think your children are also O+. I am not a doctor but this is my understanding.

    I appreciate your comments, Linda. I hope you are having a good weekend.

  • Jodah profile image

    John Hansen 

    11 months ago from Gondwana Land

    Interesting article Pamela. I have a book “The Blood Type Diet” and it is very interesting that people with certain blood types should avoid certain foods etc. My blood is A+ and I only found that out about 10 years ago. The Doctor said he wasn’t allowed to tell you (no idea why)...said if you want to find out go and donate blood.

  • Carb Diva profile image

    Linda Lum 

    11 months ago from Washington State, USA

    Pamela, a fascinating article. I'm O+ and when I was younger I was a regular at the Blood Bank--I'm a galloneer several times over.

    I'm also interested in the inheritance of blood types--both my husband and I are O+--does that mean that our daughters can only be O+? (I have no idea what their blood types are).

  • Pamela99 profile imageAUTHOR

    Pamela Oglesby 

    11 months ago from Sunny Florida

    Hi MG,

    I am glad you found the article interesting, and your comments are appreciated. I hope you are having a good weekend.

  • Pamela99 profile imageAUTHOR

    Pamela Oglesby 

    11 months ago from Sunny Florida

    Hi Bill,

    I guess the good news is you have not had any major surgeries or you would know your blood type. If you were in an accident and urgently needed blood you would get O Neg. They would do a type and crossmatch at that time also. Thanks so much for your cmments, my friend.

  • emge profile image

    MG Singh emge 

    11 months ago from Singapore

    A very interesting and informative article. Thanks for bringing out all these points, some of which I didn't know.

  • billybuc profile image

    Bill Holland 

    11 months ago from Olympia, WA

    I know this is going to sound weird, but I don't know my blood type. I was talking to Bev a couple weeks ago about this. I don't have a clue. I think I can go online to find it on the Kaisar website, but so far I keep forgetting to do so, so thanks for the push in that direction.

  • Pamela99 profile imageAUTHOR

    Pamela Oglesby 

    11 months ago from Sunny Florida

    Flourish, As I understand it fetal microchemerism is a normal human in human reproduction, but it is a fairly new discovery. "Some of the autoimmune diseases that show a predilection for women in their child-bearing years and beyond are linked to fetal microchimerism from previous pregnancies."

    (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC28946... This is a complicated article. I think it probably was a problem for me as I has system luus at such a young age. They can appear in childhhod, adulthood and even much later in life. The exact cause of autoimmune diseases is still unknown.

    I hope this answers your question, Flourish.

  • Pamela99 profile imageAUTHOR

    Pamela Oglesby 

    11 months ago from Sunny Florida

    Hi Devika,

    I appreciate your very nice comnents. I was a nurse for a long time, so I have just stsyed interested in healthcare. Thanks, Devika.

  • DDE profile image

    Devika Primić 

    11 months ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

    I am O+ and your explanations are interesting and glad I know more about mine. Informative and a must read. You inform us of new information and always a well-researched hub. It is what you know of and have shown me that in your hubs. Your interests are great and curious too. I admire your work always explained in detail.

  • Pamela99 profile imageAUTHOR

    Pamela Oglesby 

    11 months ago from Sunny Florida

    Hi Eric,

    I imagine you have had a great del of blood tests. I got 5 vials taken on Wednesday. Yhank you for your comments.

  • Pamela99 profile imageAUTHOR

    Pamela Oglesby 

    11 months ago from Sunny Florida

    Hi Flourish,

    I appreciate your comments. I will do a little research and get back to you later. Have a good weekend.

  • Pamela99 profile imageAUTHOR

    Pamela Oglesby 

    11 months ago from Sunny Florida

    Hi Rosina,

    Thank you so much for yur comments. Have a good weekend.

  • FlourishAnyway profile image

    FlourishAnyway 

    11 months ago from USA

    My mother was incompatible when pregnant with me and I wonder what your opinion is regarding microchimerism and autoimmune conditions later in life.

  • surovi99 profile image

    Rosina S Khan 

    11 months ago

    Thank you, Pamela for such a helpful and interesting article. I have O+ blood type, and I was really intrigued by the pros and cons of my blood type. All your articles are so informative- just keep them flowing. I know everyone here enjoys them.

  • Ericdierker profile image

    Eric Dierker 

    11 months ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

    So interesting. I must have had buckets drained out of me but I do not know my blood type. Hmm? My wife does.

  • Pamela99 profile imageAUTHOR

    Pamela Oglesby 

    11 months ago from Sunny Florida

    Hi Lorna,

    I think you do bleed out quicker with type O blood as it states we have less platelets. I think this make sense, so avoid traumas. LOL I think we actually might be fortunate to have type I blood. Type O blood is also better off not eating too many carbs according to the video.

    I appreciate your comments, Lorna. Have a nice weekend.

  • Pamela99 profile imageAUTHOR

    Pamela Oglesby 

    11 months ago from Sunny Florida

    Hi Bill,

    I think it is good to know what diseases are more likely with your bood type. Thank you for reading and commenting. Have a nice weekend, Bill.

  • Lorna Lamon profile image

    Lorna Lamon 

    11 months ago

    All your articles are so interesting Pamela and this one is no exception. I am type O+ which I think is a pretty common type. I wasn't aware of the characteristics of the different blood types, although relieved to note that people with O blood tend to have more positive characteristics.

    However, I wonder why they have a greater risk of death after experiencing a severe trauma. Do they bleed out quicker? Thank you for sharing this article and all the facts.

  • bdegiulio profile image

    Bill De Giulio 

    11 months ago from Massachusetts

    Very interesting, Pam. I also have O- blood. Good to know that I have a lower risk of heart disease.

  • Pamela99 profile imageAUTHOR

    Pamela Oglesby 

    11 months ago from Sunny Florida

    Hi JC,

    Your comments are appreciated. Have a great weekend.

  • JC Scull profile image

    JC Scull 

    11 months ago from Gainesville, Florida

    Hello Pamela....excellent article.

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