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Covid-19: How Life Continues Successfully During and After a Pandemic?

Updated on May 21, 2020
Mohsin Jadoon profile image

Being a social worker with extensive Master’s research in Philanthropy. I just love to write ideas that can bring a positive change.

World Health Organization
World Health Organization | Source

Coronavirus (COVID-19): Introduction

Coronavirus Family:

Coronaviruses are a family of viruses that range from cold to MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus) and SARS (Sever Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus). It is a contagious infection and most people infected with it experience mild to moderate respiratory illness and recover without any special treatment. Elder people and those with medical problems like diabetes, cardiovascular disease, chronic respiratory disease, and cancer are more likely to develop serious illness.

Spread of Coronavirus:

This spreads through droplets of saliva when an infected individual sneezes or coughs, so it’s vital that you practice respiratory etiquette (for example, by coughing into a flexed elbow).

Medication of Coronavirus:

In serious cases, hospitals focus on providing oxygen, fluids, and ventilatory assistance.

These following aids are showing positive results.

  • Ritonavir: Anti HIV medication
  • Remdesivir: Anti viral drug previously used against Ebola.
  • Chloroquine: An anti-malerial drug
  • In a study published in late March, it was reported that researchers have tested a human antibody on the new Coronavirus, which was acquired from a patient who had defeated the SARS infection years ago, which happens to be able to weaken the new Coronavirus as well.

Fortunately, we have these ways to aid the patients now as of May 2020, although no effective vaccines are available to deter infection of Covid-19. It may be available at some point but that is many months away. Nonetheless, there are many ongoing clinical trials evaluating potential treatments like remedesivir.

Vaccination:

Crises happened in the history for which humans had no remedy. Like Influenza, variolavirus and SARS etc. Yet humans endured these calamities and waited long for vaccines. The analogous the problem has emerged again in the form of Coronavirus (COVID-19).

“Remdesivir” is approved by Japan as the first official vaccine against Coronavirus (COVID-19). Japan as yet does not know when it will get its initial doses of remdesivir according to health ministry.

Japan is in discussion with several companies, including drugmakers in Pakistan and India to produce remdesivir in large quantities.

Remdesivir, which formerly failed as a treatment for Ebola virus is designed to disable the proficiency by which some viruses that make copies of themselves inside infected cells.

The company which appears to be having an edge is ”Moderna”. Have a look at the video.

Moderna Company’s vaccine and it's promising results:

Precautions:

Coronaviruses are circulating between animals and some of these have the capability of transmitting between animals and humans. These coronaviruses cause respiratory symptoms. So hand hygiene (washing your hands after contact) and respiratory hygiene (sneezing into elbow) is recommended.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) can travel almost 3ft in the air. Healthful people who are not infected with the Coronavirus (COVID-19) are suggested the following.

Some of the viruses have been shown to be able to survive on surfaces over 24 hours.

  • Maintain 6ft or more distance from those sick or showing symptoms of Coronavirus (COVID-19).
  • Wash your hands properly and frequently for at-least 20 seconds.
  • Wipe down surfaces such as kitchen counters, bathrooms, sinks, doorknobs, light switches, elevator buttons, because these surfaces are frequently touched and avoid touching things you don't need to touch.
  • Healthcare workers that are exposed to sick patients need to use protective equipment to avoid infection.

Source

Confrontations of the Past:

1. Influenza 1918 (Spanish Flu):

World War-I climaxed in 1918 and the Influenza (Spanish Flu) took over in the same year. It was called Spanish flu because it was notified by Spanish media.

Spanish flu was a respiratory virus which transmitted from animals to humans. Globally more than fifty million people died of it. The quantity of casualties was far more than the World War-I. Various Countries shut down there Economies and people were quarantined to avoid the epidemic. Vastly it was found in the soldiers who returned from the war and except Spain all others were not into broadcasting the disease publicly.

By the summer of 1919, the flu pandemic came to an end, as those that were contaminated either perished or developed immunity. Almost 90 years later, in 2008, researchers announced they’d discovered what made the 1918 flu so deadly: A group of three genes facilitated the virus to weaken a victim’s bronchial tubes and lungs to clear the way for bacterial pneumonia. Woodward and Gal (2020).

2. Orations from World War-II:

World War-II persisted for six long years. One Hundred Million people from thirty different Countries were directly involved in this war. Ninety Million people died and Economies were badly hurt, hunger and diseases contributed to the catastrophe. Agriculture and Trade discontinued for six years. Supply of animals for consumption declined drastically. Physicians and nurses were on war vanguard. Hospitals and sanitariums shut down. Medical assistance was opened mainly for militaries. People were jobless and stagflation persisted for years. Effects of war continued for more than 25 years.

History Repeats:

The history repeats and another pandemic strikes after a century again. Thousands of humans are dying every day, synonymous to 1918 Influenza and World War. Infections are unstoppable and they are multiplying.

Developed thrifts like China, United States, France and Italy are suffering due to Coronavirus (COVID-19).

  • Chinese reported a positive case in every 100 tests.
  • Similarly, The United States reported a coronavirus positive case approximately after every 50 tests.
  • Italy and Spain reported a positive case after every 40 tests.

Country
Coronavirus Positive Case Reported
China
One out of 100
United States
One out of 50
Italy
One out of 40

Early 2020 Business Recorder New

As the novel coronavirus spreads globally — more than 100 countries have reported cases — governments are ramping up testing.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) cases are increasing day-to-day, it is obvious from the figurative that limited capacity of testing the Coronavirus (COVID-19) patients is a major issue for almost every Country.

Country
COVID-19 Tests
Roughly Italy’s population is 63 million.
Italy has tested only 1.3 million people approx out of 63 million.
Japan has a population of 125 milion
Japan has tested 1 hundred and 16 thousand people out of 125 million

World Health Organisation’s Data

The situation of developing countries is worse, Pakistan has documented a positive case after every 10 examinations. Due to scarcity of resources these countries are suffering to examine huge quantity of people with signs of Coronavirus.

Lessons from Past Disasters:

There exist lessons in the past to resist the pandemic.

Lesson I:

In 1918 influenza pandemic and 2003 in SARS outbreak social distancing was extremely effective measure to eliminate the pandemics.

Lesson II:

Secondly, International Cooperation is another effective tool to slowdown COVID-19.

Lesson lll:

During the smallpox epidemic that swept across North America from 1775 to 1782, revolutionary war soldiers took an extraordinary method to protect themselves from the virus known as “variola major”.

In a process known as variolation (a.k.a. inoculation), they took virus-loaded material from an infected person’s smallpox pustule, carved an incision into the flesh of a healthy solder, and rubbed it in.

Recipients of variolation invariably got the disease, so were quarantined. About 5% died, but most got a mild version of the smallpox disease.

Lessons IV:

With the spread of coronavirus, there is a wave of anti-asian backlash in cities across the world. One reason for this is that the disease emerged in the Chinese city of Wuhan and swept through China first. This attitude and misconduct arose over and over throughout history.

During the cholera epidemics that lasted for almost thirty years between 1830s to 1860s, white protestants shunned Irish immigrants as carriers of the scourge disease.

African Americans and the poor were targeted due to 1950s polio. In the 1980s, blame was placed on the LGBTQ community for spreading HIV-AIDS.

The World Health Organization in 1980 announced that smallpox as officially the first human infectious disease to be eradicated. That was accomplished through collaboration.

Today, we can learn and act upon the fact that global cooperation and sharing of knowledge will help us deal with these outbreaks, or we can shut ourselves away and insist on going alone.

Lessons V:

According to experts, in-spite the atrocity of coronavirus, its death toll will not reach the ephemeral levels of the flu epidemic of 1918. Our public health systems, scientific tools and medical supplies are far better.
In comparison to past pandemics, we also have a head start in tackling this one.“This is the first pandemic of this scope where we have known what the pathogen is from the very start.” Lisa (2020)

The coming months will no doubt be painful and as discussed above, we should be prepared well for them. But with social distancing in place and collaborative work underway to develop treatments and vaccine. We wish to see the world back on track soon.

Will Coronavirus claim more lives than Influenza?

See results

Conclusion:

Despite all, numerous families survived various calamities during nineteenth century like influenza, World War-I and World War-ll. Universities and researchers researched on how did they survived in such a difficult time. These families not only survived the hard time but they recovered and became the most successful families of Europe.

Research results revealed

  • These families were determined to survive.
  • They reduced the consumption of utilities and and fuel to half.
  • They started learning skills like basic first aid to treat themselves and other productive skills. In this modern era one can learn various skills online in quarantine.
  • They started rationing of everything e.g they used less water and reduced the consumption of other necessities like food.
  • They stopped the shopping of luxuries and clothes for years.
  • They started saving the money to invest later.
  • Further it is advisable that charity to poor in kind, not in cash and avoid hospitals except emergencies.

By these simple approaches they were able to save enough money to start businesses in the post-war era. In post coronavirus era one can increase the efficacy with these cues.

References:

  1. Rebecca (2020, March 27). Precautionary Measures. Retrieved on April 23, 2020 from https://hubpages.com/politics/Corona-virus-Covid-19-What-is-happening
  2. World Health Organization (2020, March). WHO on transmission of Coronavirus. Retrieved on April 24, 2020 from https://www.who.int/health-topics/coronavirus#tab=tab_1
  3. Woodward, A. and Gal, S. (2020, April). Testing per Capita. Business Insider. Retrieved on April 25, 2020 from https://www.google.com.pk/amp/s/www.businessinsider.com/coronavirus-testing-per-capita-us-italy-south-korea-2020-4%3famp
  4. Johan M. Barry (2020, March 14). Influenza documentary [Video]. Youtube. Retrieved on April 25, 2020 from https://youtu.be/B5YCQamLes
  5. Lisa Marshall (2020 April 10). University of Colorado at Boulder Retrieved on April 27,2020 from https://www.google.com.pk/amp/s/medicalxpress.com/news/2020-04-lessons-pandemics.amp
  6. Retrieved on April 24, 2020 from https://www.google.com.pk/amp/s/www.brecorder.com/2020/04/08/587541/researchers-finally-discover-coronavirus-weak-spot/amp/
  7. Published in Dawn (2020 May 8). Dawn news on vaccination of COVID-19. Retrieved on May 8, 2020 from https://www.dawn.com/news/1555405/japan-approves-remdesivir-as-treatment-for-covid-19-patients

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2020 Mohsin

Please add a lesson from the past pandemics for us.

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    • profile image

      Hassan 

      3 weeks ago

      Article "Guide to survive Covid 19" is usefull article and very informative.

    • profile image

      Asim 

      4 weeks ago

      Precise and to the point information.

    • profile image

      Sobia 

      4 weeks ago

      A document produced at just right time with right info.. Looking forward for folks to get benefited from the information that has been put to it. Spread of awareness is the minimum we can do at the moment..Weldone!

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 

      4 weeks ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      Interesting statistics. I am not sure I really believe half of them. Like the absence of some countries reporting.

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