ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Metformin and Alcohol Consumption

Updated on August 2, 2011

Metformin and Alcohol Consumption

Metformin works by stimulating the naturally produced insulin in the body; this comes from the pancreas which is located in the stomach. Overweight people tend to be resistant to insulin, this means that after they have eaten, the body when the food is being digested does not use the insulin produced correctly, to compensate for this the pancreas produces more insulin. An excess of insulin in the system then creates hunger and so a vicious circle is started. Metformin when taken stimulates the body’s insulin receptors allowing blood sugar to be processed more efficiently and keeps the feeling of hunger under control

Before thinking about starting a course of Metformin for type 2- diabetes or weight loss, patients should consult with their medical practitioner to see if it will be a suitable drug for them to use. Some patients will be unable to take the drug especially if there is a history of renal or liver dysfunction, be honest too if you are a regular drinker of alcohol. If your doctor will then assess if you are fit and a yearly check up should be carried out to see the effect the drug is having upon your system.

Drinking excessive amounts of alcohol can increase the risk of a potentially life threatening condition called lactic acidosis. This is where the body produces a build up of lactic acid that cannot be neutralised quickly enough and could become toxic. When this happens the patient will feel nauseous and may have vomiting, a low blood pressure. Headache and a rapid pulse if lactic acidosis is suspected then medical advice should be sought immediately.
Lactic acidosis is a condition that can happen when a lack of oxygen in the body causes glucose in the bloodstream to be changed into lactic acid. If the body cannot process and reduce this fast enough then it could become toxic. Lactic acid can be experienced during periods of strenuous exercise, and can be felt as a muscular ache along with a burning sensation. Patients who drink large quantities of alcohol will become susceptible to lactic acidosis if they continue when taking Metformin.

Where mild forms of lactic acidosis have been experienced patients have shown little or no symptoms, more serious incidences of the condition though can cause excessive tiredness, vomiting, nausea and abnormal breathing. If the onset of lactic acidosis is rapid and severe, abnormal heart rates, low blood pressure and shock or coma could be encountered.

On being prescribed Metformin patients will should not feel any adverse effects if they drink moderately, there are those that will tell you that alcohol lowers the blood sugar levels and whilst this may be true, lower levels can result in hypoglycaemia when if this is suspected hospital treatment should be sought immediately. Consumption of alcohol is also associated with weight gain and if you are using Metformin as a dietary measure to lose weight there will be a negative effect if alcohol is drunk too often.

More information; Metformin and Alcohol

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Pollyannalana profile image

      Pollyannalana 

      7 years ago from US

      Very informative hub. Voted up! Welcome.

      Polly

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)