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Never say I want to lose weight

Updated on June 14, 2012

The Writer at Sixty. A fortunate metabolism - maybe.

   I eat heartily and am not finicky.  I drink beer and wine as much as the next guy, but I'm also aware that, as with finances, income must equal expenditure calory-wise if you want to maintain the same weight.
I eat heartily and am not finicky. I drink beer and wine as much as the next guy, but I'm also aware that, as with finances, income must equal expenditure calory-wise if you want to maintain the same weight.

Our subconscious mind understands only 'yes.'

Never say “I want to lose weight.” Just don’t do it. Why? The answer is both obvious and subtle. Firstly, what happens when you lose something? You want to find it. You want to have it in your possession again. That’s the obvious thing. The subtle thing is that our subconscious understands this absolutely. It does not reason or rationalize. It just works like an automaton, like a computer. “Something is lost, it must be found.”

I went on a diet and shed pounds

You might say, “This can’t be right, I have lost weight. I went on a diet and shed pounds.” Right. Fine. But then there comes an ongoing –albeit probably unknown to you – battle between what your conscious mind knows and what a part of your subconscious feels is wrong. It sets about wanting to right that wrong. So unless you are very astute, always aware and on the ball about what you’re doing as far as eating and exercising, you could well find yourself, in moments of lapsed attention, ‘eating to make up the weight.”

The subconscious thought always wins in the long term

Instead of saying “I want to lose weight,” to which the subconscious mind simply replies (though you don’t hear it) “Yes, you do.” And does nothing and remains the same. The subconscious thought is always what wins in the long term, for a subconscious thought is a Belief. You have to change the belief.

The writer at forty-one

At forty-one, eating up big on Macquarie Island at forty-one.  Pumping iron and drinking a lot of beer, I was probably at my heaviest.  But I was fit - very fit.
At forty-one, eating up big on Macquarie Island at forty-one. Pumping iron and drinking a lot of beer, I was probably at my heaviest. But I was fit - very fit.

The use of one's mind is paramount in gettng what one wants

Here, and I must admit I’m not a professional in this area. I’m not even an ‘educated layman.’ What I offer here is mere opinion. However, I can smugly say that at seventy-six I weigh the same as I did at eighteen. Sure, I put on about 15 percent body weight in my middle years and now find I’ve shed it as my musculature has shed some of its bulk as I grow older. This is normal. Oh, and I have worked out ‘pumping iron’ at various gyms for fifty-six years. But I really do believe what I’m saying here. The use of one’s mind is paramount in getting what one wants and this includes our wishing to find our optimum weight for our bone structure. That is, our optimum shape, size and weight for our age.

Two of Macquarie Islands 1976-77 'Intrepids' at a Melbourne Wharf

My friend, Paul Musk and I at the wharft in Melbourne in 1976 before we embarked for a year on Macquarie Island.  Paul was 29, I was forty.
My friend, Paul Musk and I at the wharft in Melbourne in 1976 before we embarked for a year on Macquarie Island. Paul was 29, I was forty.

Don't go on a diet! That's another of my beliefs.

Don’t go on a diet! That's another of my beliefs. I’m talking generally here. If a doctor of medicine prescribes a diet in the interests of your health, then who am I to say don’t do it? No, I’m talking about that multitude of fad diets that come and go. If you are ‘overweight,’ then you probably didn’t get that way overnight. It is because you ate more food than your metabolism could burn off for years on end.

No fad quick fixes. This is a long term project

Let’s say at twenty you were as you'd like to be now: trim, taught and terrific. But at twenty-five you were getting a little chubby. At thirty you were ‘on the fat side’ and at thirty five you were quite heavy. At forty you knew you were overweight and at fifty – Yipes! “They’re saying I’m obese!” Point is it took you thirty years to get that way. Don’t expect to get back to being that twenty-year-old or even that thirty year old body in a few weeks, or even months. You are looking at a long term project here (no, not thirty years – let’s say a tenth of that: three years) and you’re not going to lose weight. You are going to ‘trim down,’ 'get slimmer,'or ‘sculptor a better body,’ – any statement of a positive nature that does not use that word lose. This means a long term project of burning slightly more calaries than you take in.

The writer at seventy-five

"Age shall not weary them or the days contemn.   Unfortunately, this only applies to people who have died in their youth.
"Age shall not weary them or the days contemn. Unfortunately, this only applies to people who have died in their youth.

Don't be 'The Biggest Loser.' Everything in you will rebel against that.

There was a popular television show called, ‘The Biggest Loser.’ Can you imagine the negativity in that? In our world a loser is a deadbeat. One who cannot win. A bum. A drop-out. One who just does not care…or so the phrase, “a loser” proclaims. Now, I don’t know how those people who joined that show to shed weight will fare five, ten, or fifteen years down the track. Maybe statistics should be kept on these people as to what percentage actually kept the weight off.

The writer at twenty-three

"Hullo, sailor!"  Yours truly just a few months before leaving the navy.
"Hullo, sailor!" Yours truly just a few months before leaving the navy.

Put the bathroom scales in a cupboard and forget them

Another point. Once you’ve made the decision to ‘trim your body to its optimum shape for your age’ don’t keep running to the bathroom scales. Set to work and then put it –as much as you can – out of your mind. Find a project other than your own body. Keep a record, sure. But check how you’re going every couple of months, not every couple of days. According to Dr. Roberto Assagioli’s Psychological Law No1. (in laymans terms) “We bring into our lives that which we think about most.” Worrying about your weight will keep it in you mind and cause you all manner of angst. So just check every two or three months. You’ll know in your heart whether that weight is coming off or not.

You are not a loser! Be positive!

To summarise - you are not a loser! You are an important person. You are an individual with the right to choose. However, if you want all of what is you to be in tune, and this includes both the conscious, decision-making part of your mind, and your subconscious mind acting in harmony, then be positive. Don’t, on any account, say “I want to lose weight.", Set your goal on something positive. In that way you will succeed.

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  • Tusitala Tom profile image
    Author

    Tom Ware 5 years ago from Sydney, Australia

    Well said, jimmylesaint. You'll make it. By then it will have become a way of life and you'll remain fit. Occassional indulge then becomes okay. Life is for living, and that includes celebration. Good luck and my best wishes to you.

  • jimmylesaint profile image

    jimmylesaint 5 years ago from Metropolis of Life

    After being ambushed at 35yrs with 45kgs of fat sneaking up on me. I know the length of time it takes to return to normal. 18kgs down and 27kgs to go. I have worked it out that between 2-3kgs loss per month means it stays off, any faster it comes back.

    Well written hub with a "can do" psyche.

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