ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Novelty ideas for what to do with your deceased loved one's ashes.

Updated on January 5, 2015

 Have you ever considered what you would like your relatives to do with your ashes assuming you choose to be cremated following your death? Come to that, have you wondered what you can do with ashes you have that were once your loved ones, (assuming they left no final requests as to what they would prefer you to do with them once they were gone)? These are questions I have asked myself within the last week, and I think I have come up with some interesting and novel ideas that you might want to consider as possibilities.

1) How about having a snow globe made, (you know, those glass spheres of water with a pretty scene inside that you shake to stir up the "snow"), but instead of using the white glittery stuff they usually put in them, use the relatives ashes instead.

*****

2) Have a memorial tattoo done, and get the tattoo artist to mix some of the ashes in with the ink they tattoo you with, (really, people actually do this).

*****

3) Bury the ashes loose in your garden and plant a rose bush over them so that the plant grows using the nutrients left in the ashes and therefore become a real part of your lost loved one.

*****

4) Take up pottery and then mix the ashes into your clay before making the clay into a nice pot or vase.

*****

5) You can now pay for your ashes to be fired into space after your death, although I believe this is very expensive, plus after some time orbiting the earth your ashes will eventually burn up (again) upon re-entry into earth's atmosphere.

*****


6) Commission a portrait of your deceased relative, then get the artist to mix in some of the ashes with the paints.

*****

7) Have piece of jewellery custom made, ideally out of gold, but request some of the ashes be mixed in with the molten metal before it is formed into the ring, necklace etc.

*****

8) Have the ashes made into a diamond. Then have the diamond placed in a piece of jewellery.

*****

9) Ashes can be converted into glass objects too, and a piece of glass could be a lovely way to remember your loved one.

*****

10) Have them stuffed into a Teddy Bear, and then whenever you feel sad or lonely you can go and cuddle the bear and feel close to your lost loved one.

11) Have the ashes made into a firework, or fireworks and organise a display for the family. Sounds strange, but there are companies that will make such fireworks for you.

*****

12) Your ashes can actually be made into food grade vitamin tablets that can strengthen your surviving family for years to come.

"Modern Man-Eaterprovides you with the Current Equivalent using Advanced Technology. Your or your Loved one's body will be separated into its basic Components then Dried, Distilled, and Processed into Vitamins, Minerals, and Food Additives that can Strengthen your entire Family for years to come! Sanitary and Food-Grade Quality.
Not only Good for your Body but truly feeds your Soul."

*****

13) You can now have ashes made into pencils. Each body can make up to 240 pencils, a lifetimes supply for your family.

"each pencil is foil stamped with the name of the person. Only one pencil can be removed at a time, it is then sharpened back into the box causing the sharpenings to occupy the space of the used pencils. Over time the pencil box fills with sharpenings - a new ash, transforming it into an urn. The window acts as a timeline, showing you the amount of pencils left as time goes by."

*****

14) You could subtly arrange for either your ashes, or your loved ones ashes, to be scattered on a ride at Disney. Apparently this is now becoming a slight problem for the Disney officials.

*****

15) Have some of the ashes made into a hollow ceramic object and the remaining ashes placed within that oject, e.g. a ceramic dog, a ceramic grenade etc.

"Krafft makes hollow ceramics from pulverized cremated remains, then fills the object with the leftover ashes. He has made a ceramic military helmet for a veteran, a ceramic dog for a veterinarian, and a ceramic bottle of vodka for a friend of his ("an alcoholic gay man"). He also makes ceramic rifles, grenades, and "disasterware," including kitschy Dutch windmills with swastikas for blades. Krafft is one of the only artists in Lundgren's gallery—one of the only artists in America—who has been working in the funerary arts for years. He can't remember how long"


Now these are simply the ideas and options I have found, but let's hear what suggestions you all have for what you would like to happen to your ashes, or those of your loved ones.

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Sally's Trove profile image

      Sherri 7 years ago from Southeastern Pennsylvania

      Who ever knew there were such recycling possibilities? Just a few weeks ago I watched an episode of a TV show called Tattoo Highway where the artist mixed the ashes of a customer's deceased wife into the ink used for creating her almost life-sized portrait on his chest.

      I'm going to print out your Hub, share it with my mom, and ask her if she has any preferences as to what to do with her ashes. She might as well get that down in her will, too!

    • mistyhorizon2003 profile image
      Author

      Cindy Lawson 7 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands)

      I saw ashes being used in tattoos on Miami Ink too Sally, so it is not uncommon. I hope your Mum finds a preference from this hub and doesn't find the topic too morbid.

    • mayhmong profile image

      mayhmong 7 years ago from North Carolina

      Can't believe some people would go to that extreme with it!? I like the cute snow globe idea. But turning ashe into pills? hmmm...

    • mistyhorizon2003 profile image
      Author

      Cindy Lawson 7 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands)

      Hi Mayhmong, thanks for stopping by. I found the pills a bit of a nauseating thought I must admit.

    • profile image

      Adrian Jones 7 years ago

      Great to see an interest taken in all of these options. We have been providing hand-made bespoke crystal glass memorial items for several years now & own the UK patent for the process of fusing ashes into glass for this purpose.We are based in Somerset and are called Eternity Crystal & you may be interested in looking at what we offer too!

    • mistyhorizon2003 profile image
      Author

      Cindy Lawson 7 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands)

      Thanks Adrian, feel free to post your link here if you would like to.

    • BabaSixto profile image

      Sixto J Novaton 7 years ago from Florida

      Enjoyed your article.. will pass on the info... there is always someone asking what to do, very so often...

    • mistyhorizon2003 profile image
      Author

      Cindy Lawson 7 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands)

      Thanks BabaSixto, hope it helps them come up with some ideas.

    • profile image

      Shansty 7 years ago

      My father, a stone mason, recently expressed that when he is gone he'd like his 'ashes' to be mixed into a batch of mortar /cement which would then be used to create a stone monument, the design and creation of which he's left up to his children, most of us knowing the trade well having been involved in the family company. At first this idea threw me, but in fact it is actually a perfect and fitting last rites plan

    • mistyhorizon2003 profile image
      Author

      Cindy Lawson 7 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands)

      Hi Shantsy, this is an excellent idea and so fitting for your father when he eventually passes on. Thanks.

    • profile image

      Judy 6 years ago

      Leaving a husband of 27 years, am now 63 and in poor health and have been pondering the Snow Globe for months. It will be placed in the plot with my maternal grandparents who raised me and loved me more than anyone else in the world - what a great way for my final dirt nap. Thank you and God Bless.

    • mistyhorizon2003 profile image
      Author

      Cindy Lawson 6 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands)

      Thank you Judy, I wish you well in your health and hope your time is far from up yet, but the snow globe is a lovely way to be reunited with your maternal Grandparents when the time comes.

    • profile image

      sillydna 6 years ago

      I found this website: www.blueskygoodbye.com where you can have your ashes scattered via skydive! What a majestic sight. . .very creative and unique idea for disperal.

    • generalbrat profile image

      generalbrat 6 years ago from california,usa

      MY MOTHER GAVE ME POWER OF ATTORNEY WHEN MY FATHER PASSED AWAY SHE WAS SO DEPRESSED AND OVERWHELMED WITH MY DADS DEATH SHE COULDN'T HANDLE THIS PART MY HUSBAND AND I BOUGHT MY DAD A BEAUTIFUL CHERRY WOULD SQUARE WOODEN BOX WITH PRAYER HANDS CARVED POPPED OUT IN FRONT FOR HIS ASHES IT'S VERY NICE IT HAS TO BE OPEN AT SAME PLACE IT WAS BOUGHT IF WE EVER WANTED TO GET THE ASHES OUT. DADS ASHES ARE SAFE AND STYLISH TO DISPLAY ANYWHERE FRIENDS THAT HAVE SEEN IT DIDN'T EVEN KNOW DADS ASHES WERE IN IT. THESE ARE NICE FOR PEOPLE TO WANT IN THERE HOME WITH OUT FEELING CREEPY FROM LOOKING AT PAST URNS THEY ALSO BREAK EASY YOU WOULDN'T WANT THAT TO HAPPEN. IN THESE THICK WOODEN CASES ASHES ARE SAFE THANKS NICE TIPS FOR THOSE WHO ARE THINKING OF BEING CREMATED.

    • mistyhorizon2003 profile image
      Author

      Cindy Lawson 6 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands)

      Hi Generalbrat, that sounds like a lovely idea and a wonderful way to keep your Dad close forever more, (although I am sure his spirit is always with you wherever his ashes are kept). Thanks for the comment.

    • Gypsy Willow profile image

      Gypsy Willow 6 years ago from Lake Tahoe Nevada USA , Wales UK and Taupo New Zealand

      WOw amazing! I fancy the pencil idea. As a family of artists we are always running out so your memory would be kept fresh ( Maybe that's not a good idea!)

    • mistyhorizon2003 profile image
      Author

      Cindy Lawson 6 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands)

      Hi Gypsy, well it sounds as if the pencils will last many years, so everything drawn with them would be a memory forever for the family. I kind of like this idea too :)

    • Fluffy77 profile image

      Fluffy77 6 years ago from Enterprise, OR

      I have thought of this quite a bit, and ya know I'm undecided still but if I were cremated I want the most expensive and stylish urn so I can have my dream home. Sounds nice to me.

    • mistyhorizon2003 profile image
      Author

      Cindy Lawson 6 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands)

      Well Fluffy I suppose that is one way of getting your 'Dream Home' but I would rather have one whilst alive to be honest :)

    • profile image

      Kristy 6 years ago

      I just lost my mom the end of March and have a small amount of my mom's ashes. She was placed in an urn and buried with her parents. For my ashes, i'm going to Build a Bear and placing the ashes and stuffing into an Angelic Cross Bear and display her on my shelf. She was definitely my angel.

    • mistyhorizon2003 profile image
      Author

      Cindy Lawson 6 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands)

      Oh Kristy, I am so sorry. To lose a Mum has to be one of the hardest bereavements of all. Your Mum will always be your Angel whatever you choose to do with her ashes. My thoughts are with you sincerely.

    • profile image

      holly gagner 6 years ago

      I too lost my Mom this year and have been struggling for months on what to do. I have her ashes in a blue seashell biodegradable urn http://www.evrmemories.com/seashell-cremation-eco-... as she lived on the ocean and loved the beach more than almost anything. I saved a few of her ashes for myself and my children as you never know what the future holds and I can't bear to let go of all of her. When the time is right, we'll sail out on our boat and let the seashell go - I just am not yet ready. She was very earth conscious so I know she would approve of my decision - just very hard. Everyone keeps telling me I will know when the time is right so I'm waiting for that moment I guess.

    • mistyhorizon2003 profile image
      Author

      Cindy Lawson 6 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands)

      Trust your instincts Holly, you and your family will know when the time is right so don't force it until you are ready. She would have understood (and no doubt does), which is why you are doing the right thing by waiting. She sounds like a woman after my own heart with her being 'earth conscious'.

      Keep smiling, she would want this :)

    • profile image

      Phil 5 years ago

      I lost my mam on the 1st sept 2011. She died of cancer at on 54 yrs old. I am going to spread her ashes on the beach along with her digs ashes on my daughters 1st birthday on the 28th as man wanted to make it to see this day. I'm also going to keep a small amount to keep in babies room as mam adored her granddaughter. I'm an only child with an only child.

    • mistyhorizon2003 profile image
      Author

      Cindy Lawson 5 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands)

      I am sorry you lost your Mum Phil. I lost my first Husband to Cancer and it is heartbreaking. I love the idea of having her ashes both scattered on the beach and keeping a small amount in your babies room.

    • profile image

      lisa 5 years ago

      my dad died 3 weeks ago on the 21st of sept, he was only 56 and his death was unexpected and a real shock, it still hasn't sunk in, mums got dads ashes at home as she wants them kept there until she goes then she wants her ashes to be mixed with my dads then scattered at sea or some where.

      mum said about making jewellery out of dads ashes, i love this idea but i have 4 sisters to convince, one sister thinks my dad should be kept all together, but i cant think of a lovelier idea!

      I like the idea on here about the fire works and the sky dive....maybe for me when i go!!

      R.I.P DAD xx

    • mistyhorizon2003 profile image
      Author

      Cindy Lawson 5 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands)

      So sorry to hear you lost your Dad Lisa, you have my sympathies. I too love the jewellery idea as it is a way all you you can keep him near you, after all, when you scatter a person's ashes they do not 'stay altogether' so why is some of them being in jewellery any different! I hope you and your family find a solution you all agree on.

    • mistyhorizon2003 profile image
      Author

      Cindy Lawson 5 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands)

      Sorry Lisa, I had to block your comment as it was Spam. If you want to repost a similar comment minus the links I will allow it.

    • profile image

      golfson 5 years ago

      I would like my ashes put into a douchebag and run me through one more time.

    • profile image

      ruby 5 years ago

      I'm about to lose my two childhood pets due to old age. I've had them ever since I can remember and because my brothers and myself have had such a tough upbringing, they always provided company and affection when it was missing elsewhere. I'm probably going to be the one who will find the bodies as I am home more than the other two and I've been trying to find a way that I can emotionally prepare myself to lose the only parents I've ever known. Caring, compassionate and beautiful as they are I will have to say goodbye. This site has shown me to think of options in how to dispose of their bodies and continue their memory in a positive way. Thank you xx

    • mistyhorizon2003 profile image
      Author

      Cindy Lawson 5 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands)

      I am sad to hear about your pets Ruby. When the time comes you might also benefit from reading my article on my experience of losing one of our dogs, not least because at the end of the article contains some amazing verses and prose that are truly ever so comforting. The comments are also very heartfelt reading. The link is:

      https://hubpages.com/health/My-Beloved-Dog-Died-Ye...

    • profile image

      BoughanmiAshley 5 years ago

      I recently gave birth to my son at only 19 weeks and sadly there was nothing that could have been done to save him. I'm devastated and could not handle the thought of him being alone in the ground , so had him cremated. I'm a big fan of tattoo's and was thinking of having a memorial tattoo using my sons ashes , my husband also likes this idea. However I feel a little apprehensive as my sons ashes would not be together as my husband would also be having a tattoo , I love the idea of our son being with us for life but can't help but think that maybe storing his ashes in his first teddy , which his dad bought when he found out he was having a little boy would be a better idea , but I'm also apprehensive of this as the teddy could be lost or damaged. Any comments and help in deciding my sons final resting place would be greatly appriciated as I am young and have never had to deal with anything like this before .

    • mistyhorizon2003 profile image
      Author

      Cindy Lawson 5 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands)

      I am really sorry you lost your baby so young, how incredibly tragic. Firstly you might find my other hub on this subject helpful: https://wehavekids.com/family-relationships/Ideas-...

      That aside, I really think you should consider the tattoo idea. It only uses a very tiny amount of the ashes, and the rest could stay together in the Teddy. You said it yourself, what if the Teddy was lost or damaged? At least with the tattoos he will always be with you wherever you are. At the end of the day he is anyway, and the body is merely a vehicle he used briefly then left behind when he no longer needed it. Right now he is probably next to you with little concern for whether his earthly ashes are split into different parts or not, just as long as he can be near you in spirit.

      I hope this helps, and again you have my sincerest sympathies.

    • profile image

      jan schoner 5 years ago

      my husband is 87 - we have a funeral home picked out but i'm wondering how can i be sure that the ashes i receive are actually my husband - is there some law that governs this process - also what happens to artifical knee sockets and gold in the mouth - thanks so much for helping me.

    • mistyhorizon2003 profile image
      Author

      Cindy Lawson 5 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands)

      Hi Jan, I must admit I have heard people voice that concern before and I don't know if there is a law that governs this or not. What I will say is that last year I watched a TV documentary on cremations which mentioned this issue, and they showed an actual cremation take place, but included the entire process with the door open and then showed the removal of the ashes. I can't recall the fine details, but it illustrated how difficult it would be for you to get anything other than the correct ashes.

      As for artificial knee sockets and gold teeth I would imagine these would also either melt/burn due to the intense heat required to cremate a body.

      If you are concerned I would advise speaking to the crematorium in advance and asking them to explain the process and relieve your fears. You can probably also Google the question as you should get a wider range of replies that way.

      I am sorry about your Husband. I lost my first Husband at 48, and it is a very painful experience as you know.

    • profile image

      Gill Thompson 4 years ago

      I always said that i would put my mothers ashes in an egg timer so she could keep on working. Any idea where i can get this done and a price. Thankyou

    • mistyhorizon2003 profile image
      Author

      Cindy Lawson 4 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands)

      Hi Gill, not sure where you can get that done I am afraid. I am thinking your best bet is to do a Google search for something like 'egg timer ashes' and see what comes up.

      Good Luck.

    • profile image

      sabpol 4 years ago

      My 30 year old son passed away just over 2 years ago, I still have his ashes but not sure what to do with them. At the moment he is on my little table next to the radiator in my bedroom as he didn't like the cold. I don't want to scatter his ashes as I would feel as if I was throwing him away. I like the idea of him being placed inside a teddy, but I have only read about only a small amount of the ashes placed inside the teddy, does anyone know if it's possible to have all of his ashes placed inside a teddy

    • mistyhorizon2003 profile image
      Author

      Cindy Lawson 4 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands)

      I am afraid I can't answer that one Sabpol, but these people might be able to help: http://www.aluvybearsoaps.com/memorial_teddy_bear_...

      I am really sorry for your loss, but know your son would really appreciate the effort you are still making on his behalf.

    • profile image

      maria 4 years ago

      hi sabpol.. my Dad passed away in Jan 2013..me, my mom and younger sister have had the clock face took out of a watch and replaced it with ashes and coloured glitter, when it moves it looks lovely and sparkly, the glitter matches the colour of the diamontes round the edge of the watch..its beautiful..if you dont want the glitter and ashes to move just put resin in aswel and it will set clear and you can still see them..wear it everyday then..

    • mistyhorizon2003 profile image
      Author

      Cindy Lawson 4 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands)

      Thanks for sharing these ideas Maria, they sound perfect. Sorry to hear about your Dad too.

    • profile image

      richard 4 years ago

      i want mine to be put in a gallon of gas so i can go throught the car and engine

    • mistyhorizon2003 profile image
      Author

      Cindy Lawson 4 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands)

      Well that is certainly a different idea Richard!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      What interesting ideas, especially for "different" folks who want to be remembered that way. The Disney idea -- wow, never heard of that one! I like the pottery idea.

    • mistyhorizon2003 profile image
      Author

      Cindy Lawson 3 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands)

      Thanks FlourishAnyway, I am really pleased you found these ideas so interesting.

    • profile image

      bompsay 2 years ago

      I plan on having my ashes pressed to make a vinyl album of Pink Floyd's Wish You Were Here.

    • mistyhorizon2003 profile image
      Author

      Cindy Lawson 2 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands)

      Wow, I never knew that was possible. What a great idea bompsay.

    Click to Rate This Article