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Pain In the World for a Child with Autism

Updated on July 19, 2013
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Pain In the World for a Child with Autism

There are many things my children with Autism have been able to teach me. One of the interesting things that my daughters have taught me is how much the world hurts to them. Sights, sounds, and smells that you and I take as ordinary are anything but ordinary for them.

Smells in particular are painful to one of my daughters. It might be smells that you or I would not even notice. One child may like the smell of lemons. Another child with Autism may be in pain from smelling lemons on the other side of the grocery store.

Another one of my daughters would cry every time we went into a store. As close as I could find out the variety of items was just painful for her to see. The people were painful to see. Store staff would come to see what had happened at first.

Eventually we got to the point the staff knew us and did not have to come to see what the problem was. Going to the store has never been a pleasure for that child. She tolerates it now as an adult but it definitely is not a favorite activity.

With the variety of people, the variety of every day smells, and of course the noise in a store it is a wonder a child with Autism can cope at all. Sometimes they cannot tell who they are or who they are with. They have trouble controlling their emotions and become angry.

Our children are just trying to protect their selves but people do not understand. No child, not even a child with Autism, wants to be labeled a bad child. What a relief it was for me to be able to find out there was a way to help my children. A big part of the answer for us was sensory integration.

Getting everyone involved to use the techniques was important. Whether it was school, day care, direct care personnel, or home the consistency was important. In the beginning it was just the therapist and me. Tiny changes were seen at first but slowly the calming techniques started to make a difference. Then others wanted to know what was happening.

Sensory integration gave my children with Autism, their bodies, and their brains information about the world. It gave them information about how to deal with the world. Some of the sensory things we can do with our children are also just plain fun. The important thing is to start.

As parents we should just start. We do not need to wait for the school or anyone else. Parents can give themselves permission now. With the right information from physical therapists and/or occupational therapists we can start right away to give our children with Autism the relief they need.

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    • Writer Fox profile image

      Writer Fox 

      4 years ago from the wadi near the little river

      How fortunate your children are to have such a compassionate and understanding mother!

    • rebeccamealey profile image

      Rebecca Mealey 

      4 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA

      I agree, there are some places that are just a sensory overload for these children, and even some others. Thanks for this information.

    • Jackie Lynnley profile image

      Jackie Lynnley 

      4 years ago from The Beautiful South

      I can tell you have been a strong person and I am so pleased your children seem to be making the most of their lives despite the problems they have. Thank you for sharing that with us.

    • thumbi7 profile image

      JR Krishna 

      4 years ago from India

      I can understand how much effort you might have taken everyday with your daughters. I admire you. You could understand the problems at the correct time and you took measures to correct them.

      That is just wonderful

      Thanks for sharing this

    • mylindaelliott profile imageAUTHOR

      mylindaelliott 

      4 years ago from Louisiana

      Hey Laurie, If I understand your question correctly the answer is sort of. I don't know they actually 'see' it differently. People with and without autism perceive things differently. They attach different meanings to what they see. Any way that's how it appears with my daughters.

    • profile image

      Rayne123 

      4 years ago

      HI how are you

      I can feel the warmth and dedication you have with your children and how you relate.

      I am not to knowledgeable on autism but have heard so much about it.

      I know there was one girl that posted a mean letter that was going around the net awhile back.

      It stated how one woman told a neighbor that her child should not be playing with "normal" kids cause he was annoying. Define normal right, your children are as normal as you and I.

      How rude that was, it made me cry.

      I know its mean but I just thought to myself hm careful what you say and wish for, it may come back to you and I almost hoped it would.

      I do want to ask you a question if its ok........Does a child with autism, see things differently. Um hard for me to explain, but lets say two people are running out of a house and they see this, would they be scared or see it entirely different than someone that does not have autism.

      Many blessings

      Laurie

    • CraftytotheCore profile image

      CraftytotheCore 

      4 years ago

      My son has Autism. It is so true about the stores. Before his diagnosis, going to any store was a painful experience for the entire family. He would often cry, scream, get angry, etc. After learning his about sensory issues, we were able to overcome the challenges we faced at the store by understanding how he processes information through senses.

      Thank you for writing this Hub.

    • MrsBrownsParlour profile image

      Lurana Brown 

      5 years ago from Chicagoland, Illinois

      Hello! I enjoyed this helpful and thoughtful article. Your voice of compassionate experience is a window into the lives of children with autism.

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