ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Alcohol: Parents Beware of Tampons Soaked in Vodka

Updated on January 21, 2011

This latest one is just gross. It seems kids have found a new way to get high by inserting vodka soaked tampons into the vagina. And just so the boys won't be left out, it works rectally as well. This is one of those awful things that no one wants to believe is possible, but read on.

If you search the Internet, you will find some dispute about whether this is a real occurrence or a rumor. Keep in mind that many vaginal medications are routinely administered via tampon, and that the unprotected membranes of the vagina and anus would allow alcohol to enter the bloodstream faster than the acid protected gastrointestinal tract. The truth is it doesn't matter how it started, kids may try it when they hear about it.

It's important to stay one step ahead of your kids when it comes to drugs and alcohol. Just look at all the forum activity I found by googling vodka soaked tampon.

Yahoo Answers

The Poop Report

DVD Talk Forum

Usually when a rumor starts flying, there's at least a little truth to it. So whatever you believe to be the truth, there's no excuse for not at least acknowledging this might be a possibility. Remember when no one believed kids were really having all that oral sex?

Intoxication by alcohol soaked tampon is thought to be undetectable by parents and others. Kids think it prevents the smell of alcohol on the breath, but they're wrong. Because alcohol is partially eliminated from the body through the lungs, when alcohol is in the blood, it will always be present in expired air, and therefore detectable by smell. This is how breathalyzer tests measure blood alcohol content. It has nothing to do with how the alcohol is taken in.

Another perceived benefit is that the user gets high without the stomach upset associated with drinking. While this may be true, putting ethanol into contact with the highly sensitive vaginal or rectal mucosa likely causes burning discomfort in the short term and a drying effect over the long term. This could lead to bleeding during normal functioning.

Though this may be the first you've heard of this unusual way to catch a buzz, Oxford University scientific journals first reported the practice in the 1990s. In 2002, the University of Bristol organized seminars "Alcohol, Education and Young People", including a session on the practice of young females inserting tampons soaked in alcohol. Apparently it's very popular in Europe and South America, especially Columbia.

Read more here.

working

This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://corp.maven.io/privacy-policy

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
ClickscoThis is a data management platform studying reader behavior (Privacy Policy)