ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel
  • »
  • Health»
  • Diseases, Disorders & Conditions

Popliteal Aneurysm Surgery - How It Works & Recovery

Updated on March 2, 2015
A cutaway showing the affected nerve
A cutaway showing the affected nerve | Source

Introduction

A popliteal aneurysm is caused due to a weakening of the walls of the popliteal artery which supplies blood to the legs. Popliteal Aneurysm Surgery or PAS is a surgical procedure carried out on the artery.

In this article we explore:

  • What is a popliteal aneurysm?
  • How are popliteal aneurysms diagnosed?
  • How is popliteal aneurysm surgery performed?
  • What is the recovery time from this type of surgery?
  • Are there likely to be any risks or complications as a result of PAS?

What is a popliteal aneurysm?

A popliteal aneurysm occurs due to the weakening of the wall of the popliteal artery. This artery supplies blood to the thigh, knee and calf. When the artery wall weakens, this causes a bulge in the artery, known as an aneurysm.

If left untreated, the aneurysm can burst, leaking blood into the surrounding tissue of the leg. This can become a life-threatening condition due to several reasons:

  • Internal bleeding from the artery, resulting in significant blood loss and dropping of blood pressure.
  • Blood not being supplied to the leg, causing the limb to not receive the oxygen and nutrients that it needs to function.
  • Blood clots forming in the artery and surrounding areas; these blood clots can cause a blockage in the circulatory system or a stroke if they reach the brain.

For these reasons, surgery is an urgent requirement as soon as an aneurysm is detected.

The anatomy around the popliteal artery
The anatomy around the popliteal artery | Source

How are popliteal aneurysms diagnosed?

A popliteal aneurysm may be detected during a routine exam by a doctor or occasionally as a result of localized pain or weakness in the leg, especially behind the knee or in the foot.

If a doctor suspects a popliteal aneurysm, they will request an ultrasound exam of the affected area. This exam will confirm if there is an aneurysm or any blood clots.

The surgery is normally straightforward, quick and low risk
The surgery is normally straightforward, quick and low risk | Source

How is popliteal aneurysm surgery performed?

PAS is normally a low risk procedure and the repairs made during the surgery are often long-lasting and durable. During the procedure, a surgeon will:

  1. Make an incision in the leg close to the site of the aneurysm.
  2. Repair the aneurysm by using another section of a patient's vein or an artificial artery substitute; this is known as a bypass.
  3. Ensure that blood is flowing correctly following the repair.
  4. Suture the incision site.

Recovery is normally quite straightforward
Recovery is normally quite straightforward | Source

What is the recovery time from this type of surgery?

Depending on the patient, recovery times can vary. Typical recovery times are:

  • A hospital stay of three to five days after the operation.
  • Walking with assistance after three to five days.
  • Removal of sutures or staples after seven to ten days.
  • Light walking activities and exercise after two to three weeks.
  • Normal walking activities and exercise after four to six weeks.

Are there likely to be any risks or complications as a result of PAS?

  • If the artery was completely blocked, recovery can be much more prolonged and could take several weeks to several months.
  • Recovery times can also be impacted by a patient's level of fitness, lifestyle, nutrition and several other factors.
  • Most patients will not need crutches as a result of the surgery.

Outcomes for Endovascular Treatment of Popliteal Aneurysms are Similar to Open Repair

Have you ever had PAS?

See results

In closing

If you believe that you may be suffering from a popliteal aneurysm, you should be examined by your doctor as soon as possible. Providing that it is identified and treated early, a popliteal aneurysm need not have any ongoing or long-term impact on a patient's quality of life.

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • profile image

      glen simmons 4 months ago

      how long is the surgery

    • profile image

      Izabela 5 months ago

      Hi,

      My husband is 53 and had a femoral and tibial bypass.

      Its been 3 months since the surgery and the leg is fine.

      My question will be, is it safe to ski?

      Thanks

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)