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Natural Remedies To Effectively Rid Yourself Of Scabies

Updated on December 17, 2019

The scabies mite seems to be jumping around like crazy. I am guessing it is the season for it, as just about everybody I know seems to currently have it, in some degree or another.

Naturally, I seemed to have picked up a mild case of this infection, and, because I never had contracted it before, it has been a bit of an unnerving experience, especially in my ripe, old age. So, I considered my options:

"Hmmm...I guess I can keep ragging on myself for making out with that cute worker at Foot Locker with that weird rash on his arms like a doofus."

"Or, I can continue to keep fantasizing about making out with him again like a doofus."

"Or, I can continue to keep standing here talking to myself like a doofus."

I began to conclude that I had plenty of choices, but not too many options, so I visited a Q and A forum to present my problem, in the hopes that I might receive a few helpful answers.

Q: What can I tell my scabies to make them stop bothering me?

A: Scabies don't infect trolls. It must be something else.

A: "Bad scabies, BAD!"

I found the latter answer quite helpful, as I have a similar system for taking care of all my bills, by simply yelling at them, cussing them out, and then folding them into paper airplanes and tossing them out the window.

I do the same with the garbage, by which, if it refuses to take itself out, I cheerfully toss out the window as well.

Also with my homework, when I was a kid, by simply shoving it all off the table, so I could return to playing video games and watching cartoons. Seems to work every time.

Q: I massacred scores of scabies, including unhatched offspring, from my body, in a frenzy of rage, without a fair trial. Am I a mass murderer?

A: Indeed, you are a genocidal tyrant.

Motivated by the compliment, I probed deeper into my troubling issue.

Q: The techniques I have been employing to evict my scabies seem effective, yet, they seem infuriated. Is there anything I can do to alleviate their rage?

A: No, whatever you are doing may cause the mite to burrow deeper into your skin???????????????????????????????????????

[I am pretty sure that is the correct number of ?'s that was used here. Only my ballpark figure.]

Q: At 43, I received scabies for the first time. Once they found my blood toxic, I felt rejected. How to uplift myself, now that I am an old woman?

A: Congrats on the sex change. Celebrate the way all trolls do: shoot yourself.

Although I saw some merit to this person's feedback, I wasn't seeing how this was answering my question, so I tried a different tack.

Q: My scabies used my skin for a swimming pool, now that I deprived them of this luxury, they resent me. How to pacify their disappointment?

A: Are you as nuts as you appear to be?

A: I think this is a total failure of computer translation. It's so bad it's hilarious!

I wanted to reassure them that I was even more nuts than I seemed but feared my response would be mistaken for a result from a translator even buggier than the presumed first, so, eventually, I acknowledged that the Q and A thing was an exercise in futility because these people were useless so I decided to Google a little research of my own.

Based on what I pulled up, yup, scabies is running around right now and so, reportedly, is shingles.

If you catch scabies, the immediate, obvious first aid is to put your affected clothing into a plastic bag and jump into the shower in warm water head-to-toe with a strong flea shampoo like you get for a dog and then let it set on your entire body for 10 minutes before rinsing off thoroughly, then put the clothing into a washing machine and run a hot water cycle on 'em then call the doctor while the scabies are mostly dead or too weak to crawl around and get the doc to give you scabies professional treatment before the eggs hatch under the skin and you go itching like a madman/woman...again, from what I've researched.

I have no problem with the other stuff, but the dog shampoo thing should be taken only as a suggestion and not a clinical prescription, which can only be properly issued by your regular health care provider. Bear in mind that the remedies listed here are only things that have personally worked for me and others I know, so use at your own discretion.

Some folks do, however, feel that they have legitimate reasons to avoid using traditional medicine. The synthetic drugs/creams that are prescribed are said to contain toxins and chemicals that can cause serious side effects in some patients, especially in children, and even turn out to be completely ineffective, so even with a regular doctor, it is important to consider one's steps carefully, and to find a hcp who you are comfortable with and thoroughly suits your needs.

The same goes for a natural approach. Some testimonies, for instance, swear by a mixture of coconut oil and tea tree oil, indicating it works better than permethrin cream, and vice versa, while others say both are awesome, and neither works. Nothing is one-size-fits all, so results will vary with every individual.

Oh, that reminds me, your bedding needs to be washed immediately in hot water and soap with a little bleach and then put through the dryer, don't bring it back into the house, put it in a plastic bag, now you're going to have to get all your pets including fish out of the house then you're going to have to completely fog your house with permethrin spray best done by a professional pest control person and after the spray clean it's best to go ahead and hot steam your carpet. After that, you can bring your clean laundry back in and put it on the beds...all while keeping any unwashed laundry in plastic bags for at least 5 days to ascertain that the mites are truly dead.

Get it?

Got it?

Good.

If you are still there, take the dog shampoo advice with a grain of salt. I'm telling you, it was Google who said it. Not me.

Symptoms of Scabies

My scabies infection manifested as annoying itching on the palms of my hands, the soles of my feet, in between my knuckles and toes, and in incredibly itchy rashes along my lower forearms and around my wrists, which sorta resemble mini-gopher holes and burrow tracks, and, a few, the topography of New Zealand and other scenic views.

I am lucky enough to have self-diagnosed in time to prevent the condition from spreading any further, or to get as severe as what I have noticed in others.

And, any and all embarrassing female issues aside, this also makes me feel, for once, a little lucky to be a woman, because men who have the mite seem to have it a little harder than me, and, if you are a guy with scabies, then I guess there is no need for me to spell the rest of this out for you.

It is indicated by some source guides that if you are a first-timer, like me, it can take around 2-6 weeks for symptoms of scabies to develop, quite possibly because the immune system is new to it.

The jewelry I wear seems to do a cool enough job of concealing my rashes, but the folks who aren't zombies seem to notice 'em anyway, which is why covering them up with band-aids seems effective in warding off some of their questions.

"I, uh, cut myself shaving," I usually reply, revealing myself to be not only the only female in California with a beard, but one who has not yet learned to find its precise location.

The following photos are what my scabies bites look like. If you have bites/rashes that resemble mine, you likely might have caught these voracious little creeps too, which, of course, only your primary physician can officially identify:


Right Inner Wrist

Right Inner Wrist

Right Outer Wrist

Left Inner Wrist (Duh)

Each time I have tried to level with my scabies, politely asking them to allow me to wear my beloved bracelets/wristbands overnight without my needing to worry about their burrowing into the warm, delectable, and inviting flesh beneath, I always seem to break out in all these war trenches and dugouts and landmines by the next morning. Hmph. Uh-huh. A simple "Nooooooooooooo" would have sufficed.

If you think your scabies are doing the same thing with your jewelry, I recommend you set them aside as well, for the time being, until you ascertain they have no other safe places to run and hide too.

Now that I am done being gross, here are some techniques I have tried at home to help all these vicious, obnoxious critters from getting under my skin, which I hope will also work for you as well, in both a literal and figurative sense:

Borax

Sprinkling Borax all over your bedding and carpeting is quite historically a tried-and-true method that works to kill scabies, fleas, and other parasites by overwhelming and dehydrating their bodies, as well as poisoning them if they ingest it.

Allow the powder to settle in for at least an hour before vacuuming off; it is also recommended to include Borax along with a bit of bleach to any mite-infested laundry you have.

Although Borax is known to be a relatively safe chemical, it can be toxic to children and pets without proper supervision, (personally, it makes me sneeze), so use with care.


Sea Salt

According to many positive reports, soaking in a warm bath of sea salt for at least 15 minutes to 1/2 hour can be effective in killing scabies and their eggs, along with their feces and all that other ickiness, by allowing the salt to permeate deeply into your pores. Just bear in mind that this can be pretty skin-drying and stingy, so remember to use plenty of moisturizer if you can handle this. Don't immediately towel off after bathing, allow your skin to dry naturally to make sure the brine stays on for as long as possible.

Although regular table salt works just as well, sea salt, in my opinion, is better, because it is known by many of my fellow health fanatics to be pure with far fewer preservatives/chemicals.

The Himalayan pink variety is often touted as being amongst the healthiest in nature; nutritionists often advise that compared to table salt, which is usually stripped of all of its naturally occurring minerals, treated with conditioning agents, and then processed and bleached into its beautiful whiteness, before potentially promoting acidity in your body, Himalayan pink salt is raw and unprocessed, may contain at least 80 of its naturally occurring minerals, and could possibly even balance out your whole entire body's natural PH.

Yeah, I know. I am an extremely boring individual. Let's move on:

Vinegar

Other successful testimonies indicate that vinegar works in pretty much the same way as sea salt if you add it to your regular bath, or apply it directly to your skin, diluted with water if too harsh. So reach into your plethora of as many colorful cuss words as you can pull up, in order to put up with the sting. Although either apple cider vinegar or white vinegar should each be equally effective, I recommend you choose an organic brand for either one, whenever possible.

Aloe Vera

The gel from aloe vera leaves is considered to have anti-microbial and -bacterial properties that kill scabies as well as soothe the rashes caused by them. Some think it merely heals the rash but doesn't kill the mites, and vice versa, opinions seem to vary everywhere, but at least the plant seems to do both for me.

Plus, aloe vera is widely known to condition/soften both hair and skin, and is one of the most versatile &$@#ing plants in this whole freaking planet, so the least I can say is that for all the weeks I have been complaining about having possibly won in Guinness's Book of World Records for having hair that takes the longest to run a comb through, I had a bottle of aloe vera juice in my fridge that without the help of the scabies, I would have entirely forgotten about; so, ya see? Bloodthirsty, skin-diving, hard-to-get-rid-of bugs do have some worth in this world after all. I guess. I dunno.

Subliminals

I have been listening to a variety of subliminals for nearly a year, and many have proven miraculously life-changing for me. Some might show themselves effective in helping not only with parasites but in curing fatigue, colds, insomnia, low self-confidence, lack of mental alertness, and other issues.

Many are even thought to help some to manifest wealth, travel to different planets, meet leprechauns...and, uh, well, maybe I am getting ahead of myself here; but whether or not their effectiveness is based on placebo might depend on perception, faith, the credibility of the subliminal, and other factors. Once you get the OK from a doctor, shop around until you find one that's right for you.

Although it is okay to multi-task while listening to most meditation/subliminal videos like the one below, it is recommended that you choose a time while you are completely relaxed and without any distractions in order to really absorb their fullest potency. Also, bear in mind that any form of meditation, which is intended to clear the mind of all clutter, can put one in a highly trance-like state that can make a person unaware of immediate surroundings, which can make some feel vulnerable if they are not used to this, so it is best to be comfortable and fully prepared.

Anti-Parasitic Herbs

Even if something is considered natural, it does not necessarily mean it is good for you. For instance, some might have allergic reactions to plant-based applications while others claim they feel awesome from them, so it may be best to fine-tune, customize, and experiment with different protocols until you find what works best for you.

Vegan, anti-parasitic herbs that can be ingested internally, such as cloves, wormwood, and black walnut, have been discovered to be effective in killing/warding off parasites. Even with whatever topical treatment you decide to use, it is still vital to heal from the inside-out; again, though, always get a valid prescription from a physician, regardless of whatever treatment or regimen you choose.

Prevention

Along with measures such as personal hygiene, maintaining sanitary living conditions, and being careful about who you have personal/intimate contact with, self-care in every respect is optimum.

It is weird with me, of course, because even though I have been vegan for at least 10 years, and have never felt stronger and healthier as a result, I found that in further remaining on the holistic path to self-treatment, I only came away all that much stronger and healthier...so yeah, in an odd way, the scabies did help me, yet again. Thank you, scabies. (?)

This is not to say that a vegan/vegetarian lifestyle should be automatically considered superior to any other; I personally know plenty of healthy carnivores and others who do not thrive entirely on only rabbit food, (I am often urged even by fellow vegans to allow a grasshopper to jump in my mouth once in a while), only that it is important to remain balanced, in respects to any prescribed or self-prescribed routine.

Even when you begin feeling better, it might be best to continue to apply and reapply any and all measures you choose; it is good insurance, even long after you've stopped scratching.

And, before you bring in the laundry, you will need to take a bath and everybody in your house needs to take a bath and put all your clothing in a plastic bag for at least 5 days and you will need to take a bath by stealing some of your dog's shampoo and let it sit on you for at least 5-10 minutes once you get a scrip from your hcp and wash it off with hot water then wash all clothing y'all were wearing to rid yourself of all these skin-devouring bugs. You know. Just in case I didn't mention all that before.

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