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Tirosint: A New Option for Thyroid Hormone Replacement Patients

Updated on December 23, 2017
Wondering about your thyroid medication?
Wondering about your thyroid medication? | Source

Tirosint Replaces Outdated Thyroid Medications


After years of struggling with the side effects of Synthroid, the thyroid hormone replacement medication that is most often prescribed for patients, along with doctors' denials that the side effects were real, Tirosint® is proving itself to me.

Struggling with the standard medication drove me to try generic equivalents and Armour thyroid hormone replacement, but unsatisfactory treatment created a level of frustration that made every appointment with doctors far too stressful.

To sum things up, with the Armour I did not have the Synthroid's side effects. With the Synthroid I did not have wildly fluctuating thyroid levels. Without a thyroid I had to take something.

Most doctors' responses to my concerns included a firm stance that Synthroid was not a problem and a staunch refusal to work with me on using Armour, but I didn't give up.

Tirosint Blister Packs

Tirosint T4 hormone replacement gel caps are dispensed in blister packs, 7 to a pack.
Tirosint T4 hormone replacement gel caps are dispensed in blister packs, 7 to a pack. | Source

Saying I am glad that IBSA developed a true alternative to Synthroid is to make the proverbial understatement. The journey of getting to the medication, however, made my already interesting situation unforgettable.

The explanation is not simple, but perseverance helped win the day. Standing my ground over the years about Synthroid's side effects resulted in being bounced from one doctor's office to another, which caused me to put off seeking help at times.

Eventually a doctor who listened and did not disregard my concerns pointed me in the right direction to a specialist he was in touch with. She introduced me to Tirosint®, but it was an abrupt introduction.


Are you an endocrine patient who thinks it is high time for a new medication option?

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Meeting Tirosint, My New Friend


One reason I like my current GP is that he listens and he responds to what I say with a professional and practical attitude. He takes the time to discuss, not just tell and dismiss. I try not to take advantage of the situation but just reasonably work with him.

When he recommended a new endocrinologist with counsel that it was past time to get a specialist's input because the fluctuations could affect my heart function, I saw the new doctor. Our hope is that it might even be beneficial, right?

Right off the bat, I was disappointed by the new doc's attitude regarding Armour medication. I didn't want to argue with her, but neither did I want to be met with antagonism. However, her interview and exam were professional and thorough, though a little stiff.

I knew I had to have thyroid replacement of some sort, so her manner caused me to initially resign myself to giving Synthroid another try. I guess I hoped that by some strange coincidence it had been improved since the last time I took it.

To my surprise, and as I mentioned above, abruptly, she wound up giving me a prescription for Tirosint®, a medication I had only heard the name of from a friend. The exchange was brief, basically amounting to "try this" and she told me to come back in 6 weeks to have the blood work rechecked.

I agreed, mostly due to the swiftness with which that part of the office visit took place. Take it or leave it was the choice her quick departure left me with, so I took it. My hopes began to rise that this would really be a better option.


Tirosint delivers the needed hormone sans lactose and other ingredients.
Tirosint delivers the needed hormone sans lactose and other ingredients. | Source

Learning About Tirosint


Naturally, my next step was to do a web search on Tirosint® and learn more about this new medication. The company's home page provides helpful information, much of which I am familiar with, so I quickly went to the "Read More" page in the "Why Tirosint is Different" section.

RIght away, I read that Tirosint® is free of dyes, gluten, lactose, sugar, and alcohol, so I was immediately convinced that I needed to give this new medication a real chance. No matter how heartily doctors denied it, I knew that something in the string of medications I had previously tried was not good for me. Now I had a zero lactose product!

The page encourages patients to ask their doctor if Tirosint® might be right for them. This made me wonder why doctors are not explaining why this new medication is probably right for patients who experience side effects from the ingredients in the other available options. The answer may be obvious, but the issues related to big business, insurance companies, the AMA, and the FDA are for another hub.

On the Tirosint® website there is a support program for patients that includes savings coupons, but my new endocrinologist's nurse provided me with a great coupon as well as a free week's supply to get me started. The site also provides patients with useful links to patient tools and information that would be particularly beneficial to those who are new to the world of thyroid disorders.

The costs of medication will vary for patients in different areas of the country and according to their prescription insurance situation. For me, the Costco pharmacy cost effectively provided Tirosint® and they were glad to honor the 11 month coupon given to me at the endocrinologist's office.


5 stars for Tirosint: Thyroid Hormone Replacement Therapy

Fast Forward from My Initial Tirosint Introduction to Today


My review ends with a resounding 100% approval rating for Tirosint®. This T4 therapy in a liquid gel cap has improved my day-to-day health and well-being.

Balanced may be a good way to describe how much better I feel, but some of the specifics are that I have more restful sleep and it is easier to focus on conversations. Best of all, I do not feel sick when I take my thyroid medication.

I have not yet asked this endocrinologist why she did not explain the benefits of Tirosint® to me and actually encourage me to give it a try. I may yet, and if I do, and if I get a real answer, I will write that hub about the relationship of pharmaceutical and insurance companies to the AMA and FDA.

In the meantime, I am just going to be thankful to at last have a good source for my thyroid hormone replacement and encourage other patients to consider this newest option for treatment.


Who Should be Educated on Thyroid Issues?


Anyone can develop symptoms that may look like a thyroid issue. When it comes to thyroid symptoms, docs have too long had a no questions asked attitude toward patients. Stop the Thyroid Madness: A Patient Revolution is a great place for new patients to begin learning about what they face. Stop the Thyroid Madness II: How Thyroid Experts are Challenging Ineffective Treatments is the place for longstanding patients to begin learning about what's new. Getting the education you need for yourself or a loved one is easier than you might think.


Do you or a family member have to take a thyroid supplement or replacement?

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A Thyroid Diet

More Healthy Hubs:

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• Are you aware that acetaminophen can quickly cause liver failure?


• Is it really possible to boost your power of memory?


• How is your digestive system treating you?

Do you or does someone you know need thyroid hormone replacement medication?

Submit a Comment

  • RTalloni profile imageAUTHOR

    RTalloni 

    3 years ago from the short journey

    the raw spirit:

    Thanks kindly for stopping by and commenting. This one aspect of dealing with a thyroid disorder is a real example of doctors' ignoring patient experience with medications. I've not tried to be an expert on thyroid function or all the possible issues a person could face with it, but I knew there had to be a better way to administer the needed thyroid hormone to people. Info like the following gives me hope that positive change is coming for thyroid patients:

    http://thyroid.about.com/cs/synthroid1/a/potency.h...

    That we live in such amazing times and synthroid is still being promoted by docs as the best option is shameful. Docs themselves should be lobbying for better options for patients!

  • the rawspirit profile image

    Robert Morgan 

    3 years ago from Hutchinson Island, FL - Myrtle Beach, SC - Scottsdale AZ

    Thank you for writing this amazing article. I feel a little out of the loop, I had thought that Tirosint's was basically the same as Synthroid. Thank you for helping me to better understand the differences. Blessings, Bobby

  • RTalloni profile imageAUTHOR

    RTalloni 

    3 years ago from the short journey

    Lgj01:

    Whoa--I should say that is a high dose of Synthroid. Thanks very much for sharing some of your experience so others can use it to help figure out what is going on with their own situations.

    Tirosint's innovation will hopefully become a standard in treating thyroid conditions because the side effects of other thyroid medications (that most doctors will not acknowledge) can be depressing and even debilitating.

  • profile image

    Lgj01 

    3 years ago

    I was on Synthroid for about 12 years. I began to experience joint and muscle pain and extreme fatigue. After a year of my endocrinologist not making any changes or new suggestions I switched docs. The first thing my new endo said was to get off my high (250) dose of Synthroid. She switched me to Tirosint and about 1 month later all the joint pain was gone. I have been able to exercise, have lost some weight and my dosage is down to 137. The endo says I can absorb this medicine better. It costs more, but worth every penny.

  • RTalloni profile imageAUTHOR

    RTalloni 

    3 years ago from the short journey

    Karie O.:

    So sorry you've had such a struggle with the common prescriptions for thyroid replacement. It's more common than doctors acknowledge. Though Tirosint is a great option for those who must take the replacement, you'll want to continue doing research on healing your condition. It is possible that by addressing something as simple as nutritional needs you could eventually go off the meds entirely.

  • profile image

    Karie O. 

    3 years ago

    Thank you for sharing your experience with Tirosint. I took my first one today; I'm nervous yet hopeful! I've had two terrible weeks on Synthroid with headaches and vertigo - basically feeling like I have a concussion. Before that a few terrible weeks on Levothyroxine with trouble breathing. Guessing I'm allergic to the fillers. Dr's are ready to give me an MRI but we're trying Tirosint first. I'm quite healthy have never taken medication before. Been fatigued over the summer and found my TSH is at 16. (It went up to 30 on Levo which was strange.) My t4 is a little low but all other #'s are fine. I've always been a bit sensitive to caffeine and alcohol so perhaps I'm sensitive to Levo and Synthroid. Crossing my fingers Tirosint is the answer! Wish me luck and thanks again for sharing!

  • RTalloni profile imageAUTHOR

    RTalloni 

    4 years ago from the short journey

    ed:

    Thanks for leaving your input.

  • profile image

    ed 

    4 years ago

    great medicine best t4 medicine tried levoxyl synthroid generics better then all of them

  • RTalloni profile imageAUTHOR

    RTalloni 

    5 years ago from the short journey

    karenfritz:

    Depending on the problem a person has with their thyroid, there are also other substitutes, but this alternative to the standard thyroid hormone replacements was long over due. Thanks much for stopping in to check this information out and for letting me hear from you!

  • karenfritz profile image

    Karen Fritzemeier 

    5 years ago

    I had no idea there was an alternative to Synthroid or Armour. I will definitely look into this further.

  • RTalloni profile imageAUTHOR

    RTalloni 

    5 years ago from the short journey

    Peggy W:

    So appreciate that you let me hear from you this Tirosint hub. Thanks much for your feedback!

  • Peggy W profile image

    Peggy Woods 

    5 years ago from Houston, Texas

    What an interesting hub! This will be useful for many people who are diagnosed with having to take thyroid replacement medications. Good to know! Thanks! Up, useful and interesting votes.

  • RTalloni profile imageAUTHOR

    RTalloni 

    5 years ago from the short journey

    teaches12345:

    Thanks for adding your input to this thyroid medication hub. If I've learned anything, it's that we need to continue learning about our thyroid's needs when something goes wrong. It is important for patients to be aware of new research and resulting info.

  • RTalloni profile imageAUTHOR

    RTalloni 

    5 years ago from the short journey

    AliciaC 7:

    Thank you! I hope your friend is able to soon get the issues with her thyroid medication settled. I'm glad she has a doctor who is working with her and not dismissing the concerns.

  • teaches12345 profile image

    Dianna Mendez 

    5 years ago

    Rtalloni, I take a natural iodine supplement for my thyroid. It works well for me, but glad there are options such as Tirosint. Glad you are doing better.

  • RTalloni profile imageAUTHOR

    RTalloni 

    5 years ago from the short journey

    Jamie Brock:

    Well, you are correct about some of these foods interfering with the med's effectiveness. It's an interesting study, and important for those with imbalances.

    Loads of info can easily overload so it's good to breath deeply, take a break, and then think some more before making decisions.

    Thank you for letting me hear from you! Again, the best in your search for answers.

  • AliciaC profile image

    Linda Crampton 

    5 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

    Thanks for this very useful and interesting information, RTalloni. I know someone with an underactive thyroid gland, but I've never heard her mention Tirosint. She has some problems with the medication that she takes - although luckily she has a good doctor who is trying to find the best solution for her - so I'll recommend that she reads this hub.

  • Jamie Brock profile image

    Jamie Brock 

    5 years ago from Texas

    Ya know.. now that you mention it, I do remember reading something about brussels sprouts and soy but for some reason I was thinking it was foods that should be avoided because they could interfere with the thyroid meds.. Thank you for the link and the suggestions. I also didn't know that some health food stores had on-staff nutritionists or that there were nutritionists who specialized in endocrine counseling. I can tell you have done your research..... thank you for passing this on to me :)

  • RTalloni profile imageAUTHOR

    RTalloni 

    5 years ago from the short journey

    Jamie Brock:

    Specific foods definitely affect thyroid function. Reading up on cruciferous veggies (brussels sprout) and soy products (though you may get conflicting info--my reading has convinced me that we were never designed to eat so much concentrated soy) might give you a surprise. Here's one site that can be used as a springboard and it has an interesting discussion:

    http://www.livingthenourishedlife.com/2010/01/10-f...

    The Thyroid Diet might be helpful to you, but you may also be able to do enough searches and read several book reviews to ready you for a more in depth study of your particular needs.

    The main thing for most people to remember is that eating the right foods to maintain thyroid health is a smarter move than loading up on supplements. If there is a question about an imbalance a person could read up on feeding their thyroid correctly and/or check with a nutritionist to decide whether to try a supplement or go straight to a doctor, keeping in mind that there are serious thyroid disorders that require a specialist's care.

    If you live in an area with quality health food stores you could check around to see if any of them have a good on-staff nutritionist. As well, you could check around for nutritionists who specialize in endocrine/diabetic counseling. You know the rule: take time to absorb info before making decisions. :)

  • Jamie Brock profile image

    Jamie Brock 

    5 years ago from Texas

    You mean what we eat directly affects our thyroid?? Is there a book you could recommend for me? I am curious to learn more about this. Thank you for sharing that :)

  • RTalloni profile imageAUTHOR

    RTalloni 

    5 years ago from the short journey

    Jamie Brock:

    Thank you for stopping in and for leaving your feedback. Your experience is far too typical. There are many subtle signs of imbalanced thyroid hormone so it is very important for a patient to connect with a doctor who is willing to get to the bottom of the symptoms.

    You may want to do some thorough/careful reading, especially about how diet directly connects to thyroid function before going the route of expensive appointments and tests. I would probably still have my thyroid if I had known what I know now, and possibly not be on medication!

    Thanks again for letting me hear from you, and best to you on getting to the root of the problem.

  • Jamie Brock profile image

    Jamie Brock 

    5 years ago from Texas

    Thank you for taking them time to write this and for sharing your experience with the new thyroid med. I had not heard of it.. I haven't formally been diagnosed with hypothyroid but my last few blood tests indicated it. The first time it was brought to my attention was because of some blood work done by another doc unrelated to thyroid. The nurse called and said my test indicated under active thyroid. Long story short, the doc I saw afterwards about it didn't want to really do much because when my test came back again it was in the borderline area which the doc said was perfectly normal. It would have been fine if I hadn't been having all of the symptoms of hypo. I really got suspicious when I made a full on effort to change my eating patterns and diet for an entire month but managed to lose only a few pounds in 4 weeks time. That is not normal for me and it was very, very discouraging. That is when I started researching and found Stop the Thyroid Madness ( I think is what it is called) and was very interested in some of the things I learned and how many docs are not treating under active thyroid seriously.. it was scary to learn how clueless some doctors are about it apparently. I finally have much needed insurance so will be getting checked hopefully by a "good" doc. I had heard of the Armour.. but this Tirosint sounds very effective as well. I will definitely be keeping this med in mind in case I do find a doctor that truly wants to work with me and get to the bottom to see if I really do have a thyroid problem. Thank you so much for sharing this very useful hub and review :)

  • RTalloni profile imageAUTHOR

    RTalloni 

    5 years ago from the short journey

    novascotiamiss:

    Thanks very much for letting me know that you found this hub helpful. I appreciate your feedback and input for it is important to be aware of more than just taking the little pill on time!

  • novascotiamiss profile image

    Novascotiamiss 

    5 years ago from Nova Scotia, Canada

    This is very interesting. I am on Synthroid and don't seem to suffer any side-effects but it's always good to know other options. By the way, if you have to pay your medication out of your own pocket (don't know if it's covered by your medical insurance) you might want to order it online from Canada where generally medication is a lot cheaper than in the US. I liked the Thyroid diet video which confirmed my suspicion that a healthy diet is vital. I do eat junk food every now and then but find it less and less appealing. I noticed that the author of this video is using flaxseed oil and nuts. To my knowledge there are a few nut types that thyroid patients should avoid, one of them being peanuts. I had a very bad experience with flaxseed products and also limit my intake of sunflower seeds as both of them seem to alter my estrogen levels, which in turn have a negative effect on my TSH level. I found the video about Vitamin D very interesting and will look into my levels. I also found out recently that there could be a correlation between hypothyroidism and Vitamin B12 deficiency (I had a very bad case of that and take daily supplements now). Since I've been starting my thyroid medication I seem to absorb vitamin B12 much better and my values have leveled out. Although most doctors are generally against medical blogs I find it very interesting to exchange 1st hand experiences with other thyroid patients. Unfortunately most doctors just go according to the book and write prescriptions.

  • RTalloni profile imageAUTHOR

    RTalloni 

    5 years ago from the short journey

    Pamela99:

    Thanks very much for letting me know that this was helpful to you. I hope that your daughter is able to get her medication balanced very soon. Perhaps Tirosint will be the answer.

    It's very odd that those of us who are allergic to cow's milk are told that medications containing it are okay to take. Many people are sensitive to cow's milk but have not put the dots together to connect their digestive symptoms to the problem. Unfortunately, doctors may not be much help with this, especially specialists who stoically stand by outdated AMA/FDA recommendations. I've had the impression that some docs do so in order to keep their jobs or keep their standing with peers.

    Thanks again for stopping by.

  • Pamela99 profile image

    Pamela Oglesby 

    5 years ago from Sunny Florida

    I am sending this link to my daughter as she has had some problem with regulating her thyroid medication. Thanks for the information. Very useful hub.

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