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Why Unhappiness, Depression, Suicide Rates Peak at 45 Years of Age

Updated on November 14, 2016
janderson99 profile image

Dr. John uses skills in Biochemistry, Physiology (PhD) to review topics on mental health, depression, sleep, stress, setting positive goals

It appears that the mid-life crisis has more profound, concerning and widespread impacts than we thought. It may be built into our genes, rather than be due to changing circumstances and our failure to cope with getting old.

Perhaps surprisingly, the mid-40's is the peak time for unhappiness, highest depression rates and highest suicide rates. Even the great apes share the same pattern for peak unhappiness in middle age and so it may be linked to our biology and hormone changes as we get old.

Teenagers, the mid-20's and mid-30's groups, and older folk ( >60 years) are relatively much happier. Many people assume that the troubled teenage years is the peak age for depression and suicide, but the risks are far higher for the mid-40's group, which should be in the prime times of their lives, with all their troubles about careers, finances, relationships and health issues well taken care of.

Why does this occur?

This article presents data on happiness, depression rates for various age groups to confirm these findings. It also reviews some of the reasons why this may occur.

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Most people assume that as children we have a trouble free existence. As teenagers many of us struggle with all sorts of miserable confusion, and self doubt and hormone triggered mood swings. Then when people enter middle age everything is resolved, and everyone should be happy and contented, enjoying families, with warm established and fulfilling relationships and financial security. But, this is completely wrong. As the graphs show the middle age years, the mid-40's, are for many people the worst time of their lives. At around 45 years of age the unhappiness, depression and suicide rates all reach their maximum levels. This is when the risk of being unhappy peaks leading to increased depression and suicide. This pattern is very alarming and not well known. Because of this, the support offered for middle age people suffering high depression rates is often neglected.

The U-shaped trend of happiness over the life span (lowest in middle age, and higher for youth and senior citizen age groups) has been demonstrated all around the world and appears to be universal and biologically driven. Research studies have confirmed the pattern in more than 70 countries, both developing and developed countries, with surveys of more than 500,000.

The type of questions asked were:

‘On the whole, are you very satisfied, fairly satisfied, not very satisfied, or not at
all satisfied with the life you lead?’

‘Taken all together, how would you say things are these days – would you say that you are very happy, pretty happy, or not too happy?’

There are some interesting patterns in the data:

  • The U-shape happiness pattern, which cynically resembles a smile, applies worldwide, but the age at which happiness is lowest differs between countries (see table; Countries not shown don't have a single minimum).
  • Happiness hits rock bottom at 40 years in USA, 48 years in UK; 40 years in Australia; 62 years in France; 47 years in Germany; 46.5 years in China; 50 years in Japan; 51 years in Italy.
  • The lowest age at which the minimum occurs is Switzerland 35 years and the highest is Ukraine at 62 years.
  • US citizens have generally become less happy with each passing decade since 1900. In Europe, happiness rates showed a declining trend until about 1950, but then started to increase at a slow but steady rate ever since
  • Women show minimum happiness at about 40 years on average. For males it’s about 53 years

Age for Minimum Life Satisfaction (Happiness) in Various Countries

Country
Age for Lowest Life Satisfaction
Country
Age for Lowest Life Satisfaction
All Countries
46.1
Korea
40
Albania
40
Kyrgyzstan
47.7
Argentina
49.3
Latvia
51
Australia
40.2
Lithuania
50.4
Azerbaijan
45.8
Macedonia
49.8
Belarus
52.6
Malta
49.9
Belgium
52.2
Mexico
41.4
Bosnia
55.6
Netherlands
54.6
Brazil
36.6
Nigeria
42.4
Bulgaria
53.4
Norway
43.9
Canada
54
Peru
39.5
China
46.5
Philippines
40.4
Croatia
48.1
Poland
50.2
Czech Republic
47.2
Puerto Rico
35.6
Denmark
46.1
Romania
51.2
El Salvador
47.8
Russia
55.3
Estonia
45.1
Serbia
49
Finland
44.9
Slovakia
46
France
61.9
South Africa
41.8
Germany
47.5
Spain
50.2
Great Britain
48.1
Sweden
49
Hungary
52.3
Switzerland
35.2
Iceland
49.3
Tanzania
46.2
Iraq
51.7
Turkey
45
Ireland
50.3
Ukraine
62.1
Israel
58.3
Uruguay
53.1
Italy
50.7
USA
40.1
Japan
49.8
Zimbabwe
42.9

What is the Explanation for These Findings?

It is sad but true that there is no definitive answer. No one has been able to really prove what causes the high depression rates and low happiness rates in middle age. But there has been some speculation:

  • One possibility is the inability to cope with changes that are inherent in the classic concept of the midlife crisis when individuals have achieved their aspirations, or perhaps accept that their longterm aspirations are no longer achievable. Perhaps its triggered by a switching off or completion of the things that have driven them during their 20’s and 30’s as they face the reality of growing old.
  • Children become more independent as they grow older and this may trigger a form of empty nest syndrome or a sense that their hands-on input is no longer needed. But research has shown that the pattern occurs for people who don't have children.
  • Could it be related to economics, job security or other financial stresses? Again this does not appear to be the case as the pattern remains after demographic factors are taken into accounts, such as marital status, education, employment status, and income.
  • Recent research has shown that happiness the great apes - also follows a U-shape pattern throughout life. This suggests that it may be related to fundamental biology, perhaps to hormonal changes with growing old. It could also be related to changes in the brain. For example the frontal lobes continue to develop well into the mid-20s, but start to decline in the mid-40s. This loss of frontal-lobe function may be a cause. Some researchers have argued that this loss of frontal lobe function and various social changes may affect our ability to discount and dismiss bad news. The ability to cope with bad news and prevent it from overwhelming us has been shown to be related to depression.
  • Changes in our ability to cope with health issues, relationships and other circumstances could be a contributing factor for increases in depression in middle age. Kids, teenagers and the elderly discount unwanted information much better than middle age individuals.
  • A Japanese study showed that health status was a significant risk causing depression in both women and men. Having chronic diseases increased the likelihood of depression in men, whereas poor perceived health associated with being overweight increased the likelihood of depression in women. Having a BMI greater than 25 increased the risk of depression in women. Gender differences need to be taken into account.
  • Research shows that one major trigger for unhappiness lies in comparing ourselves to others. Many 'older females' suffer from anxiety and depression because they are simultaneously overloaded and undervalued. This may arise because of imbalance between the demands of home and career, empty nest syndrome, feelings of biological redundancy and separation anxiety (older people slip drift beyond the 'in-crowd'). Society and advertising constantly tells us that the only face and body worth having is a young face and body. Changes in hormones are probably involved. So, middle-age women with hormones changing, feel low, stressed and anxious. Life may not be what we expected and dreamt it might be, and it’s too late to turn dream into reality.
  • Financial stresses are undoubtedly a factor for many people. The median age at which bankruptcies are filed is from 36.5 to 43.0 years. Also job security has changed with less long-term employment and more short-term employment even for people over 30 years of age.
  • Increased incidences of chronic diseases, perhaps associated with being over-weight or obese, is another factor. A recent report showed that the proportion of people aged 45–64 years, with multiple chronic diseases rose from 13% in 1996 to 22% in 2005.burden of chronic illness in middle age.

Conclusion

While there has been a lot of speculation about the causes of depression in middle age, there is a clear need for better research to provide real and proven reasons and answers.

There is also a clear need for society to recognise that people in their 40’s are at greatest risk.

One of the greatest challenges is recognises gender differences in depression. The different symptoms in men and women can cause a lack of understanding and poor diagnosis. The table below summarizes some the gender differences.

Gender Differences in Depression Symptoms

Symptoms in men
Symptoms in women
Anger, irritability, ego inflation
Feels sad, apathetic, worthless
Becomes controlling
Difficulty maintaining boundaries
Becomes over status-conscious
Assumes low status
Blames others
Tendency to self-blame
Compulsiveness
Procrastination
Creates conflict
Avoids conflict
Fear of failure
Problems with success
Feels suspicious, guarded
Feels anxious, frightened
Over use of internet/TV/email
Withdrawal
Restlessness and agitation
Slows down, nervousness
Self-medicates through alcohol
Self-medicates through food
Shame
Guilt
Sleeps too little
Sleeps to much

Helping Men Overcome Depression

Because men often deny the symptoms and don’t seek help they can be more difficult to treat. Some tips are:

  • Getting men to recognizing their problems, to admit to being depressed and to seek help is the important first step.
  • Depressed men tend to have unhealthy eating habits and this makes things worse.
  • Researchers have shown that 20 minutes of brisk walking or other exercising every day is better than antidepressants.
  • Depressed men usually bypass and disconnect from their social support networks, including family and friends. Helping men to sustain and recreate these support networks is very important. Many depressed men never had any adequate social support network in the first place.

© 2012 Dr. John Anderson

Comments

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  • carol7777 profile image

    carol stanley 4 years ago from Arizona

    You did a great job on this though I found it very sad. That was such a good time for me..lots of goodthings though many changes. There are always reasons to be unhappy...We can all make lists of our problems for sure. Happiness is a habit and we can choose to be part or not. Today is difficult for many people...But I think unhappiness is who we are and no matter how good life is we will have that unhappiness if we choose. You brought out great facts and this is worthy of sharing and voting UP

  • zenpropix profile image

    zenpropix 4 years ago

    Fine work. Interesting material. Thumbs up. I would not have imagined that life satisfaction reaches its lowest point at such different ages, i.e., Switzerland at 35 and France at 62. Say, based upon the data, one might

    be wise to live in France in your thirties and forties, and then take up residence in Switzerland in your fifties and sixties! If it was only that simple.

  • Harriet Jackson profile image

    Harriet Jackson 3 weeks ago

    Yup, I can identify with all the symptoms on the right hand side. Is it no wonder? In a society that worships youth, has a thriving cosmetic and plastic surgery industry and dismisses old age outright what do you expect? It's worse for women because we are defined in terms of our beauty, breeding abilities, reading the next generation, keeping house and home together, having careers, juggling everything and the rest. By the mid 40s a woman is utterly exhausted with it all. And then you are constantly reminded of youth, beauty, success 24/7. It's an impossible conundrum and by a certain age you start to realise. My mother committed sucide by default/inadvertently because of all this. She was a model in the 60s, been fed expectations she rebelled against then regretted, was spoilt rotten and had no idea how to live a normal life. Finishing school at Le Manoir, Lausanne, Switzerland, totally screwed her up. My family were and are very ambitious. That has its pluses and minuses. Great if you make it. Be damned if you don't and live your life forever in shame or hide out in a cave. Soich pressure. We all feel it. But it's never spoken about. Stoical to the hilt even if you're screaming out in pain inside. That's my family. None of us do middle age well. None of us do any kind of 'perceived weakness' well. You put on an 'act' even if it is a living lie because the truth is too ugly to face and hey, noone likes ugliness. (Why else does the beauty industry thrive so well?) So, middle age forth coming it is no wonder many women in a global/local society like ours is so ill equipped to cope. There is a glamour associated with dying (relatively) 'young' and whilst you're still in your prime. There is too much shame in being deemed 'weak', 'useless', and 'dependent' upon others. I am, as a result of many considerations, a supporter of 'dying with dignity's and therefore I am 'pro-euthanasia'. This is my own choice, and I believe ones life is all about freedom of choice. So what I see as befitting for myself I most certainly don't apply to others. We are all unique individuals and make our own individual journeys in life: how and why we take those journeys is where freedom of choice comes into the equation. My views are my own: I don't expect people to like or agree with them. But I have the right to express them within reason just as anyone else does. It doesn't mean I'm right. I'm just saying how I feel. I hope my expressing my views helps the researcher who wrote this article to understand more about the phenomenon of sucide at the age of 45. I've been very honest. Truth (or I'd prefer to say 'Honesty', as 'truth' is relative as opposed to definitive) is a dish served up cold, as they say. I'm telling it how it is. It doesn't get more real than that.

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