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A Summer’s Death

Updated on August 27, 2016
CC by Flickr
CC by Flickr | Source

Summer will be here within a blink of the sun, for many this means fun events at large areas of recreational water. But before you and yours jump into the water – pool, river, lake or ocean consider safety first. On average 3,533 individuals drown every year. This ranks accidental drowning within the top five cause of death in the United States.

Danger Ignored

In the course of summer you are guaranteed to hear tragic news of a child’s accidental drowning. Within the above statistics experts say that one out of every five of this fatality is a child between the ages 1 and 14. As a single parent, mothers diligently work towards keeping their children safe, however many overlook the potential threat of any large body of water.

Water Damages

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provides some in depth information on the dangers of mass amount of water and the human activities within that element. In addition to the drowning, 347 individuals die from water vehicle accidents. Children not exempt from these tragic deaths experience severe injuries and spend extensive time in rehabilitation working toward complete recovery. Sometimes there is no correcting the damage that impacts the principal function of these children’s lives; they are forever unable to concentrate or participate in childhood activities. They are at times confined to bed or to the wheelchair.

Death Rank

The Center also outlines that children are mostly at risk to injuries or water fatality primarily as a result of their inability to swim. Nevertheless, many parents hesitate in signing their children up for swimming classes. Parents frequently appear to ignore the basic protective steps to prevent recreational water accidents. Water is deceptive by nature, it appears calm and hence nonthreatening so mothers understandably ignore its power. The CDC, informative by nature, managers to identity a group of parents who are greatly impacted by this oversight. Minorities, in particular, African-American children are swallowed up by water 5.5 times more than their counterparts. Their losses are more prevalent in pools and less at other recreational water. As per the CDD, death by drowning ranks 2nd in the source of children’s death in American.

Safety Features

Children who are unable to swim should not be left unattended not even for a second. Water suffocation happens quickly and the injury, even if not fatal can last for a lifetime. As previously mentioned, learning how to swim is a great deterrent to water mishaps. Many community centers offer free or low cost swimming classes. While you child learns how to swim, it is important, in private homes to use pool fences to prevent direct access to the pool. Apartment complexes and community centers are already designed with fenced in pools. As a side note, toddlers because of their body size and small internal organs can also loss their lives in tubs, so do not leave them unattended during bath time. As you wait for completion of the fence keep an eye on your child, especially if they are four or younger. These children are fearless and clueless about the hazard of large bodies of water. They see this element as another play land to explore. As per the CDC, even if your child knows how to swim it is wise to use safety gears when in any recreational water. Yes, even the Jacuzzi. They suggest that in the spirit of safety, inform older teenagers, that alcohol and a large body of water usually results in death 72% of the time. Tell them, not to drink and swim. Finally, the CDC also stressed that special needs children as well as those who get seizures should always have a floating device since their behavior and seizures are unpredictable.

CC by Flickr
CC by Flickr | Source

Safekeeping habits for visits to the water are fairly easy to establish and requires the corporation of parents and children. For these recommendations to be effective, both should commit to live up to them. Below are 8 vital wellbeing sanctions for recreational water events.

  • Have a parent outside pool, river, lake or beach monitoring the children making sure a head count is consistent; drowning is a noiseless death and only a visible eye can spot a child in danger.
  • When you child wants to swim make sure he has another playmate to accompany him; water playing with someone is fun as well as a good safety system.
  • Place floating devices around your child’s body or arms.
  • Using water toys can be fun but your child should also have the above safety device.
  • Take a CPR class it is a good skill to have in and outside the pool area.
  • Do not serve alcohol prior to getting into the water, it diminishes human reflexes.
  • Redirect your child to another favorite water activity when he want to play “how long I can hold my breath” under water.
  • Do not enter water when the weather is not favorable.

CC by Flickr
CC by Flickr | Source

Water Toxicities

Death by water suffocation is not the only danger related to recreational water. Many children have gotten sick from frequenting these places. There are some recent germs that are not instantly killed in the presence of chlorine. These germs have a strong strain of defense and are known to survive the harsh chlorine environment for a day or two. A child can get ill from these germs by month or nostril intake, as well as via the skin. The presence of substances in rivers, lake or the ocean can also make a child ill. The most prevalent illness is diarrhea caused by crypto. Children can also get ear, skin, gastrointestinal, respiratory and eye infections.

Before And After The Pool

To prevent these infections the CDC recommends that your child stay out of the water if he has diarrhea. A shower before and after entering water prevents infections. The water is not a potty area so stop your child from defecating or urinating in the water and most importantly warn your child not to drink the water. Do not allow your child to remain in the water for long periods. Have your child visit the bathroom or sit outside the pool. At this “waiting out” time you can apply additional sunscreen and ply your child with liquids. When you know you and your child will be visiting the pool remember to verify the level of chlorine. To check proper presence of chlorine use a “pool test strips”. These strips are available in major stores.

Summer time equates pool time for many children. Prior to summer, children spend a majority of their time in the classroom and look forward to spending most of their summer in the swimming pool. As mothers, try to make these fun time specter free by way of implementing safety first.

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