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Getting Ready Before Disaster Strikes Emergency Preparedness

Updated on August 23, 2017

Getting Ready Can Save Your Life

Getting Ready Before Disaster Strikes Emergency Preparedness. Each year people suffer the consequences of disaster and its devastation because they failed in emergency preparedness. Just like Noah we need to prepare ourselves for the possibilities of these emergency situations. I am a survivor of Hurricane Katrina and I would like to share some of the preparation everyone needs to do. It's not just the area of the world where disasters often strikes. You need to prepare yourself and your family for the possibility of a disaster.

We all listen to the television broadcasts of the EBS, the Emergency Broadcast System. Everyday somewhere in the world a disaster strikes without warning. But are you ready when the line "This is a Test of the Emergency Broadcast system, If this were a real emergency......" We all know the words but, what do you do when the words change to "This is an Emergency"?

Planning is the key to the welfare and safety of those in the path of any emergency. There are many things that should be done to prepare for that dreaded moment. My family and I know the pain and struggle that follows disaster and now have a much better plan in place since our experience. Everything you will need can be stored, backed up and made ready for a time it is needed and saves you the emotional traumas that go hand in hand with rebuilding a new life.

Prepare before disaster strikes - Everyone needs to prepare

Be ready have your supplies pack and ready to go for any emergency or disaster.

Natural Disasters

Prepare for Your Pet - Make a Plan

A first aid kit for your pets’ emergency medical supplies. Pet medications, take extra.

Enough Food and water for at least 3-days.

A collars with ID tags with phone numbers and pet name. A permanent microchip in case the collars and tags get lost.

A leash.

Potty pads and disposal bags.

Rescue Pet Decals – in the window of your house.

Familiar toys and bedding.

A carrying kennel many shelters require this. Mark it with phone numbers and contact info. Vets name and number and any medication needed.

Many pets are lost in disasters, make sure yours isn't one of the statistics. During disaster emergency teams arriving after the fact are usually not familiar with your particular area. The names of streets and locations many become unrecognizable and your pet could be gone forever. My cat was found floating in a large plastic salad bowl after Katrina. However, the rescuers had no idea where she was sent. I spent many month looking for her location and was unsuccessful.

During the time of Katrina we learned many hard lessons you can take advantage of during a disaster. Since that time many shelter allow pets and special pet recue teams have been set up. My suggestion is to keep your pet as close as possible and monitor their safety and health. Disaster is a very emotionally draining time and your pet will help you in your recovery.

She May Not Survive Without A Plan

She May Not Survive Without A Plan
She May Not Survive Without A Plan

Every Minute Counts!

Where do you stand when it come to being prepared?

Are You Prepared? - Disaster can strike any time or any place

Are you prepared for disaster when it strikes?

Know How to Prepare

Preparing for Natural Disaster - Preparedness Is Your Responsibility

Disaster Preparation

Fires rage across the drought ridden areas, hurricanes threaten the coasts, wind rips through tornado alley, and tsunamis quickly consume the living and their homes. No one is immune to a natural disaster! After the tragedy strikes rescue teams, FEMA and recovery workers will attempt to help as quickly as possible. This does not mean you will have the things you need for survival unless YOU plan and make it a priority.

If your disaster is imminent and you have fair warning, you may have minimal time to evacuate the area. However, many disasters come without warning. You need to have a plan where you and your loved ones can reunite if you become separated. In my community the first thing we do when an emergency is lurking is use a permanent marker and mark the names, social security numbers of parent on children and the elderly and well as their own in case separation occurs. In some instances children and the elderly will be given evacuation priority. You can't count on records to find your loved ones. Be sure to mark your identification on yourself, if you are injured or unable to speak for yourself you will be identifiable. Commonly, men carry their ID on their person were women tend to have purses, don't count of these things when it's a matter of life and death. It is an excellent idea to draw-up power of attorney documents so you can make decisions in case your spouse or parents are unable or unavailable when needed.

With this in mind prepare a kit to aid in your survival with the recommended allotment of supplies enough food and water for at least 3 days. If your emergency gives you enough time to evacuate here are some of the items you need to take with you. Keep these items pack and ready!

Emergency Supplies

Most Important

Important Documents-Insurance Policies, Birth Record, Social Security Cards, Marriage Licenses, Power of Attorney Documents, Adoption Papers, Names or Doctors and Dentists, Telephone numbers and any other important papers.

Survival Supplies-water and food for at least 3 days, medications, medical supplies and devices.

Cranking/Solar Emergency Radio with cell phone charge port.

A Full Tank of Gas-always think of your car as empty when it is at the half-way mark. Don't put this one off you may not be able to get gas when it's time to evacuate.

Cash-you will probably not have access to credit cards or banking during a disaster. The rule of thumb is that credit cards and bank cards will probably be on hold if your zip code is targeted as a disaster community.

Toiletries-hand sanitizer, hygiene products, diapers, tissue and disposable towels.

Important

Cell phone-it may not work if the cell towers have been destroyed during the disaster. They are nice to have if you have the crank radio to recharge them.

Extra clothing and shoes.

Board Games, Cards

Sleeping bags, blankets

Although your possession are important to you, during survival time you will discover that live and safety is the MOST important thing to have.

It happens in the blink of an eye

It happens in the blink of an eye
It happens in the blink of an eye

It take a long time for Recovery! But It Does Happen

It take a long time for Recovery!  But It Does Happen
It take a long time for Recovery! But It Does Happen

Diasaster Will Strike

The Hummer Coming after a Category 2 Hurricane to My Town

The Hummer Coming after a Category 2 Hurricane to My Town
The Hummer Coming after a Category 2 Hurricane to My Town

Please take some time to help the Red Cross get people on the road to recovery. When I was in need they helped me. Each of us has the responsibility to take care of those in need. One day you may wake-up and a natural disaster will have changed your life. Without the help of the Red Cross many of us Hurricane Katrina survivors would have done without food and water. I am proud to say that I survived and help the Red Cross help other victims so they too can become "survivors".

During Katrina the Red Cross provided hot meals to those of us who had nothing to eat or drink. They gave us dry clothing, water and dry good to help us. If it hadn't been for their help and the help of those who made generous donation to see us through those difficult and emotional times. Many organizations assisted with relief efforts, but the Red Cross went our of their way to make us as comfortable as possible.

Let us know your ideas?

Take a moment now

What have you done to prepare for disaster?

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    • profile image

      Ibidii 3 years ago

      This is great! Is there an amazon link for the Pet supplies and pads you mentioned. This would be great to update for hub pages. Emergency preparedness is the best thing people can do as every state has some kind of natural disaster in its history. Well done! thumbs up!

    • CampingmanNW profile image

      CampingmanNW 4 years ago

      Bugout bags always packed. Emergency food stocked as well as fresh water and water making kits. Hand crank light/radios/cell phone chargers. You name it, we have it. Thanks for talking on a subject that doesn't get much attention.

    • Gypzeerose profile image

      Rose Jones 4 years ago

      Pinned to "this I want you to know" - we all need to prepare.

    • Gypzeerose profile image

      Rose Jones 4 years ago

      Pinned to "this I want you to know" - we all need to prepare.

    • LeslieMirror profile image

      LeslieMirror 4 years ago

      I'm afraid of the fact that I have a predisposition to panic. Thus, in such horrible situation, I need someone to be next to me.

    • lisln profile image

      LorLinda 4 years ago from Denver Colorado

      I am pinning this one this lens has a lot of valuable information.

    • GardenerDon profile image

      Gardener Don 4 years ago

      The 100,000 + people evacuated in Calgary after the flooding this last week would appreciate this lens.

    • kerbev profile image

      kab 4 years ago from Upstate, NY

      I think obtaining insurance needs to be a big part of your preparedness plan. Not all homeowners policies are equal, and flood is not included on a homeowners policy, earthquakes may not be either. Talk to your agent. Be honest about what you have, and realize that cutting corners to save a couple bucks a year could cost you a fortune should you have a claim.

    • sbconcepts profile image

      sbconcepts 4 years ago

      What a wonderful lens! I admire you and can somewhat relate. We are from a part of Alabama that has been riddled with deadly and devastating tornadoes the last few years. We were very fortunate to have made it through with very minor damage, so many were not and lost everything including lives. We have since moved out west to AZ pretty far away from those types of disasters, can't say that I miss those sleepless nights. I do have to educate myself on monsoons and fire safety and this lens was a great reminder!

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