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How to remove warts at home

Updated on December 30, 2010

How to remove warts at home

Learn how to remove warts without acids, doctor visits, or "Natural" remedies that do nothing.

By reading this, you agree to take this lens under advisement at your own risk.

The Problem

What are warts?

Many people are plagued with warts of one type of another. Warts are uncomfortable and embarrassing at best, and painful at worst. While in rare cases warts will disappear on their own, they more often tend to spread and worsen.

The two most popular types of warts are "common warts" and "plantar warts". Common warts are usually found on the fingers and hands, while plantar warts are typically located on the bottom of the foot or between toes.

Warts are caused by a virus, and they run deep into the skin. Cutting warts off rarely works because the warts will grow back. Acids that are purchased at grocery stores do not work for many people. The solution for quite some time has been to "burn" the warts off by freezing them at a doctor's office. Speaking from experience, I can say that freezing is the only thing I have had success with, so let's talk about how to do so at home.

The Solution

How to get rid of warts

I will keep this simple. The solution to warts is to freeze them off yourself using a can of compressed air and a Q-tip, costing less than $10.00 instead of several expensive doctor appointments.

First, to set up your freezing tool, buy a can of compressed air that is used for cleaning computers and other electronics. Remove the red straw and throw it away. Next, cut your Q-tip in half using scissors or a knife and examine the cut end to ensure that it is hollow. Finally, firmly insert the cut end of the Q-tip into the hole in the can of compressed air.

You are now ready to treat your warts. Pick up your wart removal tool and turn it upside down so that the bottom of the can is pointed toward the ceiling. Spray the compressed air over a sink to saturate the end of the Q-tip with the freezing liquid, then quickly press the Q-tip against your wart and hold it firmly for several seconds. Treating your warts in this manner is not painful for most people because the freezing will quickly numb the wart. However, there is a stinging sensation that you will feel shortly after your warts thaw; don't worry, this will pass fairly quickly.

After the freezing, keep a close eye on your warts for about three weeks. If you notice persistent swelling or infection, see your doctor. If frozen successfully, your warts will turn different colors, scab over, and eventually fall off. This happens because the wart structure under the skin was killed by the freezing, and it takes a bit of time for natural skin to take its place. If your warts have not fallen off, then freeze them again after the three weeks. Some larger warts may take a couple of treatments, just like they would at the doctor's office.

Warnings and Considerations

What to know before you begin

The procedure I described above should only be attempted at your own risk. I can not be held liable for the outcome of any actions you take as a result of this lens. Do not treat warts on sensitive areas of your body, such as eyes, mouth, ears, etc.

When freezing, try to freeze only the wart to avoid damaging as little of the surrounding skin as possible. If you are new to freezing warts, then I recommend only freezing one to start with to get comfortable with the process.

I used this method because I don't like spending hundreds of dollars for someone else to do what I could do for $10.00. I have had warts treated by a doctor, and I noticed no difference between the doctor's results and my own. Simply put, this is a very valuable do-it-yourself lesson.

I discovered this wart removal method from an "Instructables" entry a while ago, but had a hard time finding it because the internet was so full of "natural" remedies that have done nothing for me. It is my hope that posting this freezing method will allow more people to see this great wart removal option.

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    • profile image

      Goatse 2 years ago

      The over the counter solutions never worked for me and my doc charged my like $300 a session to use a freeze gun and insurance doesn't cover it because it's "cosmetic". It's good to have these alternative methods to sidestep our ridiculous healthcare industry.

    • profile image

      m d 2 years ago

      Thanks for posting this.

    • wart-removal lm profile image

      wart-removal lm 4 years ago

      Duct tape works well, but also solutions with salcyclic acid are also effective wart removal treatments! nice lens by the way :)

    • profile image

      BellaSelina 4 years ago

      By just using apple vinegar, Eves has another success! This way is quit safe and healthy, which is quite helpful for me. It is shown in:

      psprite.com/moles-warts-and-skin-tags-removal/

      along with her complete guidance.

      Hope it helps.

    • profile image

      iknowbetter 5 years ago

      Actually, the doc uses liquid nitrogen to treat warts. The freezing of the tissue isn't what kills the virus. It actually freeze-burns the tissue and causes it to blister, triggering inflammation and an autoimmune response from your body. Typically warts go unnoticed because they only effect the top layer of the dermis. You're really just tricking your body into attacking the invading HPV cells. I use the trick you suggested at home. First, I find a straw that has an end that fits the size of the wart. I have someone hold it in place firmly over the wart and fill the straw up about 1 in. with the liquid compressed air. You can feel it and see it bubbling inside the straw. Hold it there for 8-12 seconds and repeat 2 or 3 times. Check again three weeks later and if you still see the black spots after soaking the wart and removing the top crusty layer, than start the process over.

    • JustinNapier profile image
      Author

      JustinNapier 6 years ago

      @mom-247: I believe the treatment is the same between skin tags and warts - the goal being to kill the odd tissue without breaking the skin. There's definitely some pain involved with the compressed air too, but it's very minor and (best of all) much cheaper :)

    • mom-247 profile image

      mom-247 6 years ago

      This is interesting - my dermatologist squirts something freezing directly from a can onto any little skin tags she finds. It actually really hurts, so this sounds more humane. My mother in law is a nurse and she told me that they used to x ray warts to get rid of them with great success. Until they realised that they x ray machine had been set incorrectly and actually wasn't doing anything. In other words it was purely a placebo effect and for a long time they continued treating people knowing that it worked, but they weren't really treating them.

    • mom-247 profile image

      mom-247 6 years ago

      This is interesting - my dermatologist squirts something freezing directly from a can onto any little skin tags she finds. It actually really hurts, so this sounds more humane. My mother in law is a nurse and she told me that they used to x ray warts to get rid of them with great success. Until they realised that they x ray machine had been set incorrectly and actually wasn't doing anything. In other words it was purely a placebo effect and for a long time they continued treating people knowing that it worked, but they weren't really treating them.