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What the heck is dyscalculia?

Updated on May 4, 2012

Dyscalculia? Never heard of it.

Dyscalculia is kind of like the Jermaine Jackson of the dyslexia family...

Most people have heard of dyslexia, but dyscalculia is much less well-known. Dysclaculia is a learning disability similar to dyslexia, but where dyslexics have trouble with words, dyscalculics have trouble with numbers.

There is plenty of information available about dyslexia, both on off the web, but much less information about dyscalculia. In fact, dyscalculia is so much less well-known that most spell-checkers don't know the word. As I'm writing this, every instance of "dyscalculia" and "dyscalculic" are underlined in red by the spell-checker here at Squidoo.

I was diagnosed with dyscalculia, or mathematics disorder, when I was a junior in college. At that time there was very little information about dyscalculia -- all I knew was that I finally had a good reason to have gotten all those failing grades in math. What I didn't know was that this learning disability effects my life if dozens of other ways, many of which having nothing whatsoever to do with math.

I'm writing this so that others won't face the same paucity of information. I will talk about how dyscalculia is defined, different theories about what causes it, and the effects is has on the lives of people who have it. I will also talk about some of my favorite coping strategies, and what NOT to say to someone who has math LD.

Gratitude! Lens of the Day, February 1st, 2010!

Thank you for reading this!

I want to begin with a quick Thank You to NanLT who gave this lens its first Angel blessing. Thanks also to Stazjia and Prosperity66 for their Angel blessings. And thanks to Wednesday Elf for nominating me, and then the Squidoo powers that be, for making this the Lens of the Day!

It's always wonderful to get recognition, but these props aren't just about me. The blessings and LotD have helped get the word out about dysclacluia!

Thanks also to everyone who has read this lens, rated it, and left comments. It's a clear statement up support, and proof to me that my writing is having an impact.

Dyscalculia, Defined

When does "bad at math" become a disorder?

I could give you the whole "Diagnostic criteria for DSM-IV 315: Mathematics Disorder", and the "disturbance of Criterion A, B, and C" entailed therein (aww, good ol' Criterion A!), but instead I'll put it in English.

Dyscalculia can only be diagnosed by a trained clinician. This person might be a psychiatrist, clinical psychologist, or an educational counselor working for the schools. The test administrator takes a detailed academic and personal history, sometimes looking at old report cards and transcripts if they're available, and then administers a series of tests. These tests cover general intelligence and various sub-skills including several math components.

A person is diagnosed with dyscalculia if their math scores are substantially lower than expected given the person's measured intelligence, chronological age, and educational attainment. The person's mathematical abilities must also interfere significantly with their daily life, and their academic achievement.

Dyscalculia is generally diagnosed in people of average or above average intelligence. This means that we are not stupid, slow, or developmentally disabled. Some of us are even gifted. We simply have a brain difference that makes it difficult or impossible for us to learn math the way it's usually taught in school.

Dyscalculia in math class? Well, the good days were like this... - Sorry, you've been wangernumbed!

Mitchell and Webb, a hilarious British comedy team, have an entire series of sketches about a surreal game show called Numberwang. They all speak to my experience as a math student, the one that captures it best is the "German" version, N├╝mberwang. When you have severe dyscalculia, your math teacher might as well be speaking a foreign language.

... and the bad days were like this. - I had some pretty mean teachers.

I also included another episode of Numberwang which you should watch if you want to know what it feels like to be math disabled student with a teacher who's impatient, or worse, abusive. I could really identify with "Johnny", who is frantically guessing at the answers to nonsensical questions, only to be told repeatedly and angrily that the answers are wrong, until it's finally demanded of him, "Are you even trying anymore?"

Meanwhile, another student is getting all the right answers and is receiving abundant praise ... but to Johnny, those answers are equally nonsensical.

But you don't have to take math class anymore. So what's the big deal?

Dyscalculia and the rest of my world

Once a dyscalculic is free of math class, the disorder continues to have repercussions in daily life. Think of all the numbers you need to deal with as you go about your day.

You might need to write down an address, enter a new phone number in your phone, and balance your checkbook.

Then let's pretend you signed up for a new fitness class. You look at the clock and see that it's almost time to leave. You enter the address into google maps, call up the directions, print the map, and go, arriving at your class on time. You're a beginner, but you're able to do most of the movements more or less in a coordinated way, and you manage not to punch yourself or anyone else in the face.

For someone with dyscalculia, any of these activities can be extremely difficult. It turns out that dyscalculia relates not just to a person's ability to deal with numbers and math. Dyscalculics often have trouble keeping track of time, and can have difficulty relating a two dimensional object like a map to three dimensional terrain. Dyscalculia is also correlated with difficulties keeping time and coordinating movement, which can cause problems for someone trying to remember dance steps or follow an aerobics workout ... or remember where they're supposed to be on the playing field.

Needless to say, math was always my least favorite subject in school. I avoided doing it whenever I could, my grades were awful, and I was always in trouble with my parents and teachers for poor performance.

I was told to check and double check my work -- oh goodie! I get to do every problem twice! -- but when I did, I came up with a different answer each time.

Since I was also in the gifted program, it was assumed by the adults around me that my only problem was that I didn't care. My parents told me I failed because I wasn't trying. My teachers told me I failed because my mind wandered during class. My parents told me I should ask my teacher if I needed help. My teachers told me I didn't need help, I just needed to apply myself. Help was for students with "real" problems.

I learned to stop asking for help. By junior high I was struggling quietly, but I was passing my classes, and my teachers had their hands full with other, more disruptive students.

I was the only one in my group of friends who wasn't getting A's in honors math. Actually, I was the only person in the honors section who wasn't in honors math at all. I had heard of dyslexia by this time, and I began to wonder if there was something just like it, only with math. On the other hand, I wasn't actually failing, so maybe there was my problem really was laziness. Maybe I just didn't know how to try.

I wanted to go to college, so I had to keep taking math classes. Geometry was a bright spot -- like many people with dyscalculia, I found geometry to be logical and sensible, until they started putting equations in with the proofs -- but by the time I took my last math class I was getting D minuses. My parents were not amused, but I found a small liberal arts college that gave heavy weight to admission essays, and off I went. I swore I'd never take another math class ever again.

So there I was, at a selective liberal arts college, finally and completely surrounded by my fellow nerds. I was in heaven, mostly. One of my classes was giving me trouble. I had signed up for a physics class because I liked science. It was a class for non-majors, with a qualitative emphasis, and what math there was would be simple -- supposedly required only basic algebra. Well, I thought, I scraped by with a B- in basic algebra. I can handle this, right?

Wrong. In the two years since I'd taken a math class, I'd forgotten all the algebra I'd ever known. I was also taking introductory economics and struggling with the basic math required for that. My political science major required me to take a statistics course. If I was flunking every single econ test because of the math, how would I possible handle statistics?

This was the last straw. Clearly, something was not quite right with my math abilities, and I needed to get that straightened out before the dreaded stats requirement. I got a referral for a learning disabilities assessment, and lo and behold, there it was: DSM 315.1. Dyscalculia: "Math skills significantly below normal considering age, intelligence, and education."

In addition to the dyscalculia, I was also diagnosed with a writing disorder called dysgraphia, and attention deficit disorder. I felt incredible relief and validation when I learned that my academic struggles stemmed from genuine, clinically diagnosed disabilities.

My life as an adult with dyscalculia

hey look, there's a light ant the end of the -- *splat*!

Knowing that I have dyscalculia has been a tremendous weight off my shoulders, but by no means has it meant an end to my struggles. I need to use a calculator for any math more complex than single digit arithmetic, and even then I often screw it up because I transpose digits (people tell me that 16 and 61 are not the same thing, but I suspect a conspiracy). This makes it impossible for me to balance my checkbook -- I tried once, and because I worked the math out with a calculator very carefully, and wrote everything down very carefully, I was confident of the amount I had in my account. I wound up bouncing several checks.

After my partner and I got married, we were assigned a ten-digit phone number comprised of ten different numerals, and it took me six months to memorize it correctly. When you're a fully-fledged grown-up and you don't know your own phone number, people don't exactly take you seriously.

For most of my working life I have been unable to make more than a few dollars above minimum wage. Do you remember being told to take a lot of math classes, because the more math you take, the more earning potential you'll have? Well, it's true, and that's bad news for dyscalculics. People with dyscalculia tend to earn much lower salaries than other people do.

I have also lost jobs because of my learning disorders. Apparently when people hear you use words like "epistemologically" in casual conversation, they expect you to be able to do simple math, and when you can't, they don't know how to cope. Sometimes easier for them to decide "you're just not a good fit" and fire you.

What's that you say? It's illegal? Why yes, yes it is! Have fun proving it.

What Are The Symptoms Of Dyscalculia?

I wish I'd known this years ago!

Dyscalculia can be indicated by many symptoms, and not all of them have to do with math. This list of symptoms can be found at dysclaculia.org. I reordered them to start with the bad-at-math symptoms, then moving on to general intelligence, and from there to other deficits that surprised me when I found out about them -- but that sure explained a heck of a lot!

Bad At Math

Dyscalculia is defined by an individual's math difficulties, which present in the following ways:

When writing, reading and recalling numbers, these common mistakes are made: number additions, substitutions, transpositions, omissions, and reversals.

Inability to grasp and remember math concepts, rules, formulas, sequence (order of operations), and basic addition, subtraction, multiplication and division facts. Poor long term memory (retention & retrieval) of concept mastery- may be able to perform math operations one day, but draw a blank the next! May be able to do book work but fails all tests and quizzes.

Inconsistent results in addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. Poor mental math ability. Poor with money and credit. Cannot do financial planning or budgeting. Checkbooks not balanced. Short term, not long term financial thinking. Fails to see big financial picture. May have fear of money and cash transactions. May be unable to mentally figure change due back, the amounts to pay for tips, taxes, etc.

General Intelligence

People with dyscalculia are often gifted in other areas of academics and the arts:

Normal or accelerated language acquisition: verbal, reading, writing. Poetic ability. Good visual memory for the printed word. Good in the areas of science (until a level requiring higher math skills is reached), geometry (figures with logic not formulas), and creative arts.

Sports and Games

Math class was awful, of course, but so was gym ... turns out there's a reason for that:

May have poor athletic coordination, difficulty keeping up with rapidly changing physical directions like in aerobic, dance, and exercise classes. Difficulty remembering dance step sequences, rules for playing sports.

Difficulty keeping score during games, or difficulty remembering how to keep score in games, like bowling, etc. Often looses track of whose turn it is during games, like cards and board games. Limited strategic planning ability for games, like chess.

Problems in All Four Dimensions!

Between dyscalculia and ADD, it's a miracle that I'm ever on time:

Difficulty with the abstract concepts of time and direction. Inability to recall schedules, and sequences of past or future events. Unable to keep track of time. May be chronically late.

May be unable to comprehend or "picture" mechanical processes. Lack "big picture/ whole picture" thinking. Poor ability to "visualize or picture" the location of the numbers on the face of a clock, the geographical locations of states, countries, oceans, streets, etc.

Poor memory for the "layout" of things. Gets lost or disoriented easily. May have a poor sense of direction, loose things often, and seem absent-minded. (Remember the absent minded professor?)

Social Difficulties

Mistaken recollection of names. Poor name/face retrieval. Substitute names beginning with same letter.

Music

I've been studying music since I was 7, so finding this out was kind of a big deal for me:

May have difficulty grasping concepts of formal music education. Difficulty sight-reading music, learning fingering to play an instrument, etc.

Do all dyscalculics have every one of these symptoms?

Nope. To be diagnosed as dyscalculic, you have to have most of the "bad at math" symptoms, but the other symptoms are a collection of difficulties that tend to co-occur with dyscalculia. Their incidence and severity vary based on the individual.

For instance, I am chronically late, physically uncoordinated, and have difficulty with such sophisticated and complex card games as "Go Fish", but for some reason I do well with maps and directions. I also have varying degrees of difficulty with formal music education. I took intro theory three times before I really grasped voice leading practices, but now it's stuck in my brain for good; whereas my sight-reading ability continues to be weak, in spite of a few decades of practice.

Dyscalculia does not equal Stupid

If you remember nothing else from this lens, remember this! Dyscalculics are not stupid or lazy. We are smart people who struggle with math because of a neurological difference.

Top Ten Dyscalculia Coping Strategies

... at least, I think it's ten. But then, I'm probably the wrong person to ask.

Learning to cope with dyscalculia has made my life a lot easier. I've slowly learned to manage my space, my time, and my health, and recently I've started to earn decent money working for myself. Here are my favorite strategies for number avoision (it's a perfectly cromulent word!):

1. Request a phone number that's easy to remember. I didn't know you could do this, but fortunately my partner figured it out, and since the disastrous first phone number he's gotten phone numbers with as many repeating digits as possible. I can usually remember them in a few weeks instead of a few months.

2. Throw out your address book. Keep all your contact information in your cell phone, and back it up on your computer.

3. When you need to get someone's phone number, have them call you on your cell phone. You can send the call straight to voice mail, and your phone will give you the option of saving the number as a contact.

4. Use e-mail, rather than the phone, to set up appointments. E-mail allows you to cut and paste street addresses right into the search bar of mapping software, so you'll get the address right, which means that you'll arrive at the right place.

5. Use gmail to manage your schedule. Gmail is a free, web-based e-mail system that includes a great calendar feature. You can cut and paste dates and times into your calendar, and then customize reminders in the form of SMS, e-mails, and pop-ups.

6. Outsource your accounting. Fortunately for me, my partner is good with the math and is willing to handle accounts. If you don't share a household with a math person, hire one. You will save yourself money in the long run.

7. Consider a time tutor. "Time tutors" are often ADD coaches who people with Attention Deficit Disorder learn how to manage their time, but they're a great idea for dyscalculics as well. I have my schedule mapped out on my gmail calendar as different colored blocks; for instance, I work out during "green" blocks of time and I do chores during "blue" blocks of time.

8. Try visual-tactile solutions to manage your budget. Get some colorful poker chips, and assign a denomination to each color chip -- say green is $100, blue is $50, red is $20, yellow is $5, and white is $1. Put them in cups for each budget line item. For example, If you have $100 a week to spend on groceries, put five red chips in a cup marked "groceries". If you spend $60 dollars at the grocery store, take three of those chips out of the cup. Pretty soon you'll be able to visualize your budget in a concrete way, and it will be easier to manage.

9. Get a cat. Or a dog, or fish or rabbits or geese. Animals are great stress relief because they don't care if you can do calculus.

There, I guess that's ten. Right?

Five (or something) of the dumbest things people have ever said to me about dyscalculia

and the things I wish I'd said back

1. What are you, retarded?

No. I have a learning disability, which is only diagnosed in people of at least average intelligence. By definition, I am not retarded. And if I were, would you really make fun of me for that? You'd pick on someone with a developmental disability? Wow. I hope you feel big.

2. You could understand math if you tried hard enough!

Would you tell someone in a wheelchair that they could run a mile "if you just tried hard enough?" No? Didn't think so. Then why on earth do you think it's appropriate to tell someone with an invisible disability that their only problem is a lack or willpower?

The fact is that those of us with dyscalculia have tried to do math. We've tried harder than you can ever know. We've struggled a lot and we've failed a lot, but we're still here because we've had to develop the kind of strength you can only imagine.

3. Don't worry, this math is easy!

For me, there is no such thing as "easy" or "basic" math. No, don't try to tell me that this math is somehow different. It's not. It never is.

It's also really embarrassing to have to tell you that the math you're describing as "idiot-proof" or "so easy a first-grader could do it" is nonetheless beyond my capabilities. So, thanks for that.

4. I know just how you feel, I'm bad at math too!

No. You don't.

If you didn't go to bed every night of your childhood believing you were hopelessly stupid, if you don't have panic attacks every time you have to figure out how much to tip your server, if nobody has ever asked you just how dumb are you, really? when it's taking you too long to find the correct change, you do not know how it feels to have dyscalculia.

5. Have you tried using this new thing called a calculator?

Wow! No! Never! What a brilliant suggestion! In all my life it has not EVER occurred to me to try using a calculator! Holy crap, you've just changed my life! How can I ever repay you!

The fact is that dyscalculia often can't be solved by using a calculator. Dyscalculics transpose digits, drop decimal points, and forget signs, none of which are things a calculator can correct.

And seriously, why does anyone assume that a calculator wasn't the first thing I tried? Sheesh.

6. It can't be that big a deal. It's not like you're expected to do calculus every day!

Yeah, it's not like I ever need to read the correct number on the bus, or keep track of time, or have any idea whatsoever how much money is in my bank account!

Dyscalculia causes difficulty with numbers in every way, shape, and form. It's not just about doing advanced math. It's about doing easy, everyday math. It's about keeping track of phone numbers and addresses. It's about reading bus and train schedules. It's about all of those little things that non-dsycalulics do all day, every day, without having to think about it.

So if someone you know has dyscalculia, or seems to be struggling with numbers in any way, this has been a list of what NOT to say. We've heard 'em all, we've had enough, and one of these days one of us will snap and begin throwing calculators.

OK, uncoordinated dyscalculic that I am, if I were to start throwing calculators I probably couldn't hit anything.

Still, it pays to be nice.

Books About Dyscalculia

When I was first diagnosed, I could find hardly any information about dyscalculia. Now there are more than a dozen titles on Amazon alone.

The first book looks like it actually contains dyscalculic coping strategies. I haven't read it but I'll be checking it out soon. The others are aimed at teachers, parents, and tutors of students with dyscalculia. I've found that when I read about math teaching strategies I get incredibly triggered, so be warned.

"What The Heck Is Dyscalculia" is One Year Old!

How many candles is that?

I'm on Squidoo today for the first time in a long time. I've had to look for full-time work, and that's taken all my time and energy for several months now. But for some reason this evening I decided to log on and play with my lenses and I noticed that this lens has been up for a whole year!

In that year, 1523 people have visited this lens. You, dear reader, are adding to that number (adding is where the number gets bigger, right?). Every time someone visits this lens, or clicks the "like" button, or makes it a favorite, or links to it, its page rank goes up and makes it easier to find. Every visit to this lens increases the chances that someone in need will realize that they're not alone. That maybe there's a name for what they're going through. And maybe that name is "dyscalculia".

You, dear reader, rock.

Do you have dyscalculia? Do you know someone who does? Did you learn something new?

This was my very first lens on Squidoo, about a very important, personal topic. I'd like to say a big "thank you" to everyone who critiqued it, made suggestions for improvements, and to all visitors and commenters. By learning more about this disorder you're helping everyone who has it.

Thanks for dropping by! - Leave me a note.

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    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      This is an amazing lens. So informative - I had no idea dyscalculia existed. I took a lot of information away with me, thank you. You have a great writing style AND sense of humor. You had me laughing from the first sentence: The Jermaine Jackson of dylexia....LOL. 5* and FAV. Make more lenses.

    • Kate Phizackerl1 profile image

      Kate Phizackerl1 7 years ago

      A very good resource

    • Cherry-Ambition profile image

      Cherry-Ambition 7 years ago from U.S.

      Wow... I also didn't realize dyscalculia existed, but it makes sense. If people can do it with letters, why not numbers?

      Like your sense of humor, too. I'm just sorry you weren't able to find out about your condition sooner.

      I think maybe you should consider submitting this to the Squid Angels for a blessing. :)

    • patrickbrianone profile image

      patrickbrianone 7 years ago

      WOW! Pretty strong for your first lens!

      You critiqued one of my lenses in the CRITIQUE section of the forum. Thanks for the advice!

      5*

    • Addy Bell profile image
      Author

      Addy Bell 7 years ago

      Thanks to everyone who gave feedback and ratings! I'm glad this lens was useful and I'm looking forward to making more.

    • justholidays profile image

      justholidays 7 years ago

      Your lens touched me a lot as we were two in the family to have both dyslexia and dyscalculia! 5****** from me. This lens is a top one!

    • Teddi14 LM profile image

      Teddi14 LM 7 years ago

      My para professional has this. She can easily understand what our students are going through. Great lens!!! I am going to lensroll you back to my special education lens. Thanks also for featuring it here too.

    • Teddi14 LM profile image

      Teddi14 LM 7 years ago

      [in reply to patrickbrianoneill] I think it is an excellent first lens!!!!

    • OhMe profile image

      Nancy Tate Hellams 7 years ago from Pendleton, SC

      I had never heard the term dyscalculia so this lens was a true education for me. Excellent first lens and welcome to Squidoo

    • sheriangell profile image

      sheriangell 7 years ago

      I love your writing style and the way you present your information. Quite an education you provide while entertaining your readers at the same time. Very impressive!

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      I forgot to mention, numberwang is absolutely hysterical.

    • Addy Bell profile image
      Author

      Addy Bell 7 years ago

      [in reply to ChapelHillFiddler] I remember being told in health class at some point that the cerebellum was only concerned with motor function, but lately I've been reading that it's more complex than that. It seems to be implicated in dyscalculia, some types of dyslexia, and is critically important in music comprehension as well.

    • profile image

      Tatsuo 7 years ago

      Great lens! I've never heard nothing about dyscauculia. More knowledge for my brain, and one more thing to talk about with my friends, family... 5 stars!

    • HollyDawnSmith profile image

      HollyDawnSmith 7 years ago

      Great lens! I had never heard of Dyscalculia. Very informative with some great comic relief in your delivery. Also nice addition with the tips for coping and some very real help for others with Dyscalculia. Nice job!!

    • Marbar LM profile image

      Marbar LM 7 years ago

      Thanks for joining dyslexic Struggles and Information....

      Dyslexic World

      Your lens is wonderful and very detailed!

    • AppalachianCoun profile image

      AppalachianCoun 7 years ago

      This is a awesome lens. Thank-you for all the info, we were unaware. God Bless and

      5 stars*****

    • profile image

      Donnette Davis 7 years ago from South Africa

      Thank you for the information on this lens. I have rated 5 * and added it as a featured lens to Educational Activities for Children With Dyslexia

      Have a great weekend :)

      Donnette

    • profile image

      Donnette Davis 7 years ago from South Africa

      [in reply to Donnette] Oh i just had to re-read this lens......... LOL.. it's absolutely brilliant....... going to try the lensroll thing again now and see if it works for me this time.... gotta be one of my faves as well :)

      THANK YOU for sharing!

    • Ramkitten2000 profile image

      Deb Kingsbury 7 years ago from Flagstaff, Arizona

      This is excellent! I'm so glad you stopped by one of my lenses, which led me back to yours. This is so well-written and I really learned a lot about something I previously knew nothing at all about. And your introduction, by the way, is really top-notch. It drew me right in. I'm going to add this to the "Lenses We Like" section on SquidU, so more folks will know about it. Great job!

    • Addy Bell profile image
      Author

      Addy Bell 7 years ago

      [in reply to Ramkitten] Thanks, Ramkitten! I appreciate anything that gets the word out.

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      Hello :) to start with, this is an awesome lens that is very informative.

      I have dyscalculia too! For a very long time I've been wondering why have I been so poor in math? but though I have dyscalculia, I excelled in other subjects. I finished college and earned my master's degree with flying colors. I just came to accept that numbers are my weakness.

      Accept what you are and love yourself more... that's my motto :)

      5*

    • Addy Bell profile image
      Author

      Addy Bell 7 years ago

      Thanks to everyone who has rated and left comments. I am always happy to know I've been informative, especially about such a personal subject as this one.

    • profile image

      CleanerLife 7 years ago

      Wow, eyeopening! I was an A student in subjects like History (even remembered the proper dates, somehow), but barely scrapped by in my math subjects.

      I've considered myself a "self-diagnosed" dyslexic for a long time, but this actually sounds much closer to the problems I've faced all my life. I know I'm not dumb, because I actually used my intelligence to cover up my problems, and manage to get passing grades in school.

      I'm good with remembering numbers, even phone numbers for short term (as in hours), but usually need to use a keypad to remember numbers for the long term -- I'm basically remembering a pattern using my fingers, not the actual sequence of numbers.

      Any arithmetic gives me a headache, a real one! Even just adding single digit numbers is difficult for me. When I do something like my taxes I must use a calculator, double, triple or even quadruple check my work, because I will make plenty of mistakes transposing numbers.

    • Addy Bell profile image
      Author

      Addy Bell 7 years ago

      [in reply to CleanerLife] I was always good at dates in history too. I think it's because I could place them in a narrative. For instance, I know that the thirty years' war started in 1618, not 1816, because it had to do with the Reformation and by 1816 Europe was having wars about other things.

      Either that, or my history teachers knew I understood the material and chose not to mark me down for my mistakes :)

    • NanLT profile image

      Nan 7 years ago from London, UK

      I'm a self-diagnosed dyscalculic as well. My eldest son has ADD and dyslexia.

      At least, it's the best explanation I have ever come up with for my problems with numbers. Single digit addition, no problem. Usually. Anything more complicated and I need a calculator. Anything on a graph - forget it. It's all one big blur to me. University statistics (a required course for the nursing program) I had to take twice. Barely scraped by with a C the second time around.

      I also have problems with co-ordination - a feeling like I'm not quite inside my skin is how I would describe it. And am absolutely horrible about remembering names with faces, and phone numbers, and birth dates. If not for my blackberry and organiser diary I'd never know where I was supposed to be or what I was supposed to be doing each day.

      Thanks for providing a glimpse of dyscalculia. You've been blessed by an angel.

    • evelynsaenz1 profile image

      Evelyn Saenz 7 years ago from Royalton

      Thank you so much for teaching me about dyscalculia. I had never heard of it before. It certainly reinforces the idea that math should be taught using multiple intelligences. Math is more than numbers and many mathematical concepts can be better understood by some people using manipulatives or by singing rather than with abstract numbers.

      Thank you for featuring my lenses.

    • spunkyduckling profile image

      spunkyduckling 7 years ago

      I've never heard of this but am quite familiar with dyslexia. I don't have either of these conditions but I can only imagine what it might feel like for those who do have it. Excellent topic. Well written. Thank you for sharing. I like the strategies you've offered on how to help deal with it. People could be really insensitive when they don't understand something. Its good to know others can learn from your experience.

    • GonnaFly profile image

      Jeanette 7 years ago from Australia

      Thanks for this eye-opening lens. I love your sense of humour. 5*

    • sneakerz profile image

      sneakerz 7 years ago

      Well they say you learn something new everyday. I have problems with numbers, but it is very mild, maybe I need to get checked out.

      When I saw the lens title I thought it was a joke, but this is very informative. Keep up the good work.

    • tutor1235 lm profile image

      tutor1235 lm 7 years ago

      Wow, this has to be one of the best sites on dyscalculia I've ever seen! As a special ed teacher and tutor, I've seen numerous students and suspected this to be their problem, though undiagnosed by the schools, and you've confirmed my thoughts. I'll be forwarding this one to several parents that I know to help their information store. Keep up the good work!

    • Demaw profile image

      Demaw 7 years ago

      Excellent lens. I must admit I had never heard of it before as a separate disease. There is a field called Daily Money Manager which is usually geared towards the elderly or the busy. Someone either virtually or comes to your home or business and does basic money management like reconciling check books. This can be a part of what a Virtual Assistant offers also. They are not allowed to give financial advise like stocks or trusts. Just basic financial help. Just google it. This could be of help for someone who has no math person as a partner. 5*

    • jimmielanley profile image

      Jimmie Lanley 7 years ago from Memphis, TN, USA

      This wonderful lens is now (finally) featured at Learning and Teaching Math Headquarters.

    • Addy Bell profile image
      Author

      Addy Bell 7 years ago

      Great, Jimmie, thanks!

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      I'm featuring the noodle on my fan-club thank-you lens, but I was really torn, because I love the way you write and all your lenses. I always get excited when I see you have a new one. The noodle, well, you outdid yourself that time. But this one is great too. Thanks!

    • kerbev profile image

      kab 7 years ago from Upstate, NY

      You're right. I was totally unfamiliar with this.

    • Teddi14 LM profile image

      Teddi14 LM 7 years ago

      I just had a student added to my class last week that has this. I am sending this link to her mom. :-)

    • profile image

      AlinaWarner 7 years ago

      Amazing thank you, for sharing your knowledge high 5*****s !

    • poptastic profile image

      Cynthia Arre 7 years ago from Quezon City

      I've just been through a lot of your lenses and I think you are highly intelligent and have a wonderful sense of humor. I can't imagine how difficult it must've been for you to go through school with dyscalculia but I admire you for pushing on. Thank you for sharing your knowledge and experience with all of us!

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      DYSCACULIA SUCKS ROTTEN EGGS

      me- a 38 y.o, college student who has gotten straight A's and B's, except.., in math. But wait, that is not all,

      directions, telling time, dates, tiomes, places, appointments,spelling, coordination, I pretty much am special needs in THOSE departments.., I have been "let go" from every job I have ever had because I can not remember the sequence of things they want me to do, or I am just not fast and coordinated enough. AM I DOOMED TO BE A POOR GRUNT WORKER? I wouldn't mind if I were not so damned smart.., but alas, sigh, groan, tear, weep, wail, cry, sob, wail.., heartwrencihg scream!!! I can not seem to DO anything well enough to make a decent living at it, no matter HOW HARD I TRY, and I DO t-r-y!!! I read My Thirteenth Winter a memoire' written by a young lady with Dyscaculia, and even she was struggling to get and keep a real job. Can I be a writer.., maybe, maybe that is the true destiny of all Dyscalculiacs.., but that is so risky, not reliable, steady, so competitive.., god, I am up the crik of SH?T with no available paddle!

    • Addy Bell profile image
      Author

      Addy Bell 7 years ago

      @anonymous: Wow, I really wish I had some good answers. This is a pretty common rant at the dyscalculia forum right now ... it seems like we tend to wind up in unusual professions (animal training, for example) after getting kicked around the grunt labor market for awhile.

      I guess the only thing I can say is "good luck" ... and when I find the answers, I'll post 'em here!

    • PromptWriter profile image

      Moe Wood 7 years ago from Eastern Ontario

      Wow, I'd never heard of this. My husband's a math teacher so I'm going to forward it to him.

    • profile image

      Kapalbility 7 years ago

      Hey Addy, want me to teach you accounting? LOL. Wow, this is a really informative and entertaining page about that learning disorder. But I do know how you feel about face- name recognition. I have to be with a person at least three to five times before I remember their names and faces so embarrassing... especially in business! Six stars. :)

    • Addy Bell profile image
      Author

      Addy Bell 7 years ago

      @Kapalbility: Heh. Thanks for the offer for accounting lessons, but NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!

      The face-name thing sounds like a visual processing issue (overlaps some with dyslexia, dysgraphia, dyscalculia).

    • Addy Bell profile image
      Author

      Addy Bell 7 years ago

      @PromptWriter: THANK YOU. I would love for this to find its way into the hands of as many teachers as possible.

    • Mahogany LM profile image

      Mahogany LM 7 years ago

      Your structure, your insight, your humour (I was tickled from line one: "...the Jermaine Jackson of the dyslexia family"). Five stars!

    • Wednesday-Elf profile image

      Wednesday-Elf 7 years ago from Savannah, Georgia

      Wow, Addy - Math may be your LD, but writing is where you excel. Fantastic presentation of a difficult subject, and done with a wonderful sense of humor! If even one teacher-parent-person learns from this from the standpoint of 'helping' someone who needs it, instead of 'ignoring' the problem (and the child or adult), you will have done a great service by presenting the facts about dyscalculia and sharing your story! I'd give this lens more than 5* if they were available! I certainly DID learn something new, and very glad I did. Thank you.

    • profile image

      ShortSaleRealtor 7 years ago

      I learned something new today hi 5 to you

    • FlynntheCat1 profile image

      FlynntheCat1 7 years ago

      Congrats on your LOTD - this was really interesting. Lensrolling on my Dermographia lens because it also begins with a D and no one has ever heard of it either! :D

    • Heather426 profile image

      Heather Burns 7 years ago from Wexford, Ireland

      congrats on LOTD!

    • profile image

      GrowWear 7 years ago

      Wow! And a wonderful first lens it is! Congratulations for LOTD for What the heck is dyscalculia?

    • desilegend profile image

      desilegend 7 years ago

      Great lens! I always hated math and only now I realised that I have a problem with numbers... But I guess you learn to live with it... I know at least 2 people more like this. Congrats on LOTD! Thanks

    • profile image

      glowchick 7 years ago

      Very interesting lens and congrats on being chosen the LOTD. I know it will be perfect for getting the word out about this learning disability.

    • profile image

      DavidEh 7 years ago

      I was wondering if chismbop was of any use to you or people with this disfunction?

      Loved the presentation! !i!

    • greenerme profile image

      greenerme 7 years ago

      Congratulations on LOTD! I've definitely never heard of this, but I feel like I know a good deal about it now. Thanks!

    • aka-rms profile image

      Robin S 7 years ago from USA

      Congratulations on LotD!

    • Stazjia profile image

      Carol Fisher 7 years ago from Warminster, Wiltshire, UK

      Congratulations on LOTD. I'm so glad I've read this lens on dyscalculia because all my life I've had problems with numbers and math. I used to come in the top 5 for subjects at school except for math where I would scrape along in the bottom 20%. I'm totally unreliable when taking a number down, I still have to think hard to remember our phone number (we've had it for 2 years) and somedays I have to look at my dog's collar tag! I knew I wasn't stupid but couldn't remember math's methods to save my life, yet I was really good at geometry. I'm glad that I might have the answer to all this after so many years. Thank you for this lens. Blessed.

    • Sylvestermouse profile image

      Cynthia Sylvestermouse 7 years ago from United States

      Wow, this is very enlightening! I have never heard of dyscalculia before. Congratulations on a well deserved Lens of the Day!

    • joanhall profile image

      Joan Hall 7 years ago from Los Angeles

      This was fascinating! I work part-time at a private school, and I'm going to recommend that we check out some of the resources you have listed here for evaluating and helping students who are "bad at math". I know I've had a tendency sometimes to blame a student's previous teachers for not "giving them a good foundation in the basics", but it's good to remember that there could be other issues going on, like dyscalculia. (yup, the spell-checker flagged it, alright).

      Congratulation on LOTD and thank you for sharing!

      And always remember, 485042913856234894723! Got that? ;-)

    • delia-delia profile image

      Delia 7 years ago

      great interesting LOTD, congrats!...5*... I now wonder if this was the problem I had with math in school...yes I did learn something new!

    • Abseaz LM profile image

      Abseaz LM 7 years ago

      Add me to the list of people who had never heard of this before. I love the way you've explained it, so that anyone can understand it but its not too dumbed down. Now I'm thinking of using this topic for my research paper this summer. Thanks for the idea!

    • SusanDeppner profile image

      Susan Deppner 7 years ago from Arkansas USA

      Wow! Very informative, very well presented. I did learn a lot while enjoying both the facts and your amazing sense of humor. Congratulations on a well-deserved Lens of the Day!

    • Faye Rutledge profile image

      Faye Rutledge 7 years ago from Concord VA

      I'd never heard of dyscalculia. Thanks for all of the information. Wonderful lens. Congratulations on LofD!

    • stacy mcdaniel profile image

      stacy mcdaniel 7 years ago

      Congratulations! I am "bad at math". I"m really good at remembering phone numbers. I hate being late. I play the drums. I think I'm a little OCD and sometimes a perfectionist. I'm really not sure what I have. You can always find a calculator in my purse. If someone was to explain a math problem to me, I hear what they are saying and I see it but, when they are done it's like all I herd was blah, blah, blah, I'ts kind of weird but that's the only way I can explain it. I would love to be able to do math one day. It does add a lot of stress.

    • indigoj profile image

      Indigo Janson 7 years ago from UK

      A fantastic LOTD -- well done Addy!

    • myraggededge profile image

      myraggededge 7 years ago

      You have highlighted this problem really well and made salient points with a wicked sense of humour! I don't think I suffer from discalculia but as a child, being asked to do maths would send me into a panic. I can do more complicated things but mental arithmetic makes me spin. I also have never been able to read music or dance. An aerobics class would be my idea of hell.

      Very well written and congrats on LotD!

    • profile image

      evora93 7 years ago

      Thank you so much for this lense. Now I know why I have struggled with math and numbers all of these years. I also have some of the other "symptoms" you describe. What a relief to know that there is a reason for the way I am.

    • ElizabethSheppard profile image

      Elizabeth Sheppard 7 years ago from Bowling Green, Kentucky

      This is a great lens. I enjoyed reading it. People really need to know about discalculia, and this lens helps so much with that. I think I myself probably have discalculia. It can interfere with directions too, so the map printouts you talked about are a must!

      You have some great links on this lens. A great website you may want to add too is the Friends of Quinn site. Here is the link: http://www.friendsofquinn.com/

      It is a place where people with disabilities can get information and support. Thanks for the great lens, and congratulations on winning Lens of the Day!

    • mamakat lm profile image

      mamakat lm 7 years ago

      This is a great lens. I had never heard of this disorder.

      I've always been 'bad at math,' but nothing like you're describing, so I guess I can't blame it on discalculia...lol! When I first started reading this page, I thought "Eureka, here's my answer"

      Sad to say, I guess I can't blame it on this learning disorder, either....unless I just have a mild case of it.

      Congrats on LOTD! Hope this helps you get the word out.

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      Very informative and well put together lens. Thank you for the information.

    • mariaamoroso profile image

      irenemaria 7 years ago from Sweden

      I know all about this. Have it and have been struggeling my whole life. I am so grateful for calculators .....

    • Wednesday-Elf profile image

      Wednesday-Elf 7 years ago from Savannah, Georgia

      Addy, I am so pleased and excited for you that this lens was chosen as Lens of the Day! I was so impressed with it when I read it last night, that I nominated it for LOTD and can't believe they picked it IMMEDIATELY! Makes my day to know this wonderfully written lens, with its important message, was recognized in this way. Wish I could give you 5* all over again :). A BIG congratulations!

    • Lee Hansen profile image

      Lee Hansen 7 years ago from Vermont

      Fascinating ... at least to one who doesn't struggle with dyscalculia (although I personally don't love mathematics). Thanks for enlightening us, and congrats on a truly unique lens of the day.

    • sheriangell profile image

      sheriangell 7 years ago

      Very well deserved LOTD! Even though I read this lens back when it was first published, I enjoyed reading it again. Congrat's to you!

    • Kylyssa profile image

      Kylyssa Shay 7 years ago from Overlooking a meadow near Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA

      Congratulations on LOTD! I've always loved this lens. It's about time your skills were recognized!

    • Rachel Field profile image

      Rachel Field 7 years ago

      Great lens and an interesting read. Thanks for creating awareness.

    • justholidays profile image

      justholidays 7 years ago

      I thought I already blessed this lens as I loved it the very first time I read it - the first time I met Addy;)

      SquisAngel blessings for this page that will teach you everything you always wanted to know about dyscalculia but didn't dare to ask!

    • profile image

      Income4life 7 years ago

      Congratulations on LOTD! very informative

    • profile image

      kimmanleyort 7 years ago

      Very interesting lens and so informative. Congratulations on LOTD! You have quite a niche here.

    • verymary profile image

      Mary 7 years ago from Chicago area

      Wonderful lens!! Congrats

    • profile image

      Suncatchercreations 7 years ago

      Very informative fun read!

      We are affected by AHDH and have a lens also regarding it and substance abuse.

      http://www.squidoo.com/AdultADHDHelp

    • profile image

      bonchic 7 years ago

      HELP US HELP YOU !

      Emmy-winning team seeks expressive, self-aware child age 7-12 who REALLY struggles with dyscalculia but who also may have talents/gifts in OTHER areas.

      The goals of this major cable television network film are to shatter myths about people who learn differentlyâas well as clarify what a learning difference is.

      This will be a sensitive, non-exploitative film about children with learning differences, by children, for children and adults alike.

      NO CHILD MAY PARTICIPATE WITHOUT WRITTEN PARENTAL CONSENT.

      We are on a tight deadline but if anyone has a special child who fits the criteria above, please contact me.

      LDFILM@AOL.COM

      Thank you

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      Thank you for this. I have math coped for my whole life. It seems to run in our family also. Problems remembering sequencing ( for me dance steps in order) math altogether except for Plane Geometry my only math A. checkbook, being late or time lapsed, getting lost or trouble getting there. I have created some major math solutions. poems,rhymes with phone numbers to remember...my own. It seems I work 10x harder than most people to do simple remembering of numbers. I could do a lenz my coping strategies.

    • profile image

      Einselgaenger 7 years ago

      Excellent lens! Interesting and informative.

    • newbizmau profile image

      Guided Abundance 7 years ago from Mobile, AL

      It's interesting that this is Lens of the day. I just got off the phone with a friend who was telling me she never learned multiplication by memory. Congrats on LotD!

    • profile image

      bonchic 7 years ago

      Emmy-winning team seeks expressive, self-aware child age 7-12 who REALLY struggles with dyscalculia but who also may have talents/gifts in OTHER areas.

      The goals of this major cable television network film are to shatter myths about people who learn differentlyâas well as clarify what a learning difference is.

      This will be a sensitive, non-exploitative film about children with learning differences, by children, for children and adults alike.

      NO CHILD MAY PARTICIPATE WITHOUT WRITTEN PARENTAL CONSENT.

      We are on a tight deadline but if anyone has a special child who fits the criteria above, please contact me.

      LDFILM@AOL.COM

      Thank you

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      Okay, I was cracking up when I read this --not because it's funny in general, but because it's sooo funny to me....because it IS me! I truly feel like there is fuzz in brain when it comes to numbers. And at 39 I STILL ADD ON MY FINGERS! lol

    • profile image

      JenniferStephens 7 years ago

      Thanks so much for this lens! Some of my husband's family members struggle with math issues but one of his brothers is now a math teacher! I had no idea there was a different name, etc. for math problems. I am so glad to know and better understand.

    • profile image

      Swagger1 7 years ago

      Congrats on LOTD!

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      thanks for taking time to write this lens, I knew I had Dyslexia, and always thought my lack of ability to deal with numbers, coordination, mixing up times and dates, was just apart of that, from reading your lens it is clear to me I have dyscalculia, gee lucky me I have both. I know exactly what it s like to be known as dumb stupid retard, dim witted, not the sharpest pencil etc, to the point in my late teens it drove me to attempted suicide. Panic attacks catching the right bus, was I on the right Bus ? o God what if I got the wrong bus where the heck will I end up ? writing / typing date of birth. Americans do this backwards thing with their dates crap. It wasn't until I met my Partner almost 16 years ago, that for the first time in my life I found out I was intelligent and gifted. Suddenly my mind became like a sponge. I still have a hard time of things, I still forget what my phone number is, or write down the wrong number, dates whatever. I need help fulling out any ofical government form, because nothing stays ont eh page as it should do. Just now I know one simply fact, I'm not dumb, or thick or retarded in fact I'm a genius, that thinks and sees differently from the rest of the world, which enables me to problem solve things others can't, help people simply because of a unique view of the world I have.what was once I curse ( some days still is) Is also one of my greatest gifts and blessings. So have some pachents with people like us, and the rewards will be far more than you ever expected.

    • profile image

      Earthenshine 7 years ago

      I've actually always been very good at math, in fact I love it. I've always joked about being dislexic with numbers, but didn't know that there really was a term for numeric dislexia. I was interested to know this. I'm sure I don't have this condition, but sometime I have issues with transposing numbers or my mind reads one number but my mouth spews a different one. Great lens!

    • Teddi14 LM profile image

      Teddi14 LM 7 years ago

      Congrats on Lens of the Day! I have been here before and I have referred others to it. Being a special education teacher I have a number of students who suffer from this. Very informative lens! BTW, thanks for featuring my special education site on this lens!

    • profile image

      amithist 7 years ago

      Amen!!! Thank you soo much for sharing

      I use to call myself verbally-numerically dyslexic..Learning left from right literally took years and I still have to wear a Ring on my Right hand. I also still swap my letters and words ie .The bogs are darking.. and when writing its the s,d,b,n,m and so on that get me. It took many years to learn to touch type but at least ppl can read most of what I write now.

      AdHD didn't exist when I was in school. It was called unteachable, lack of motivation and so on. I didn't find out till my early 30s that I my dyslexia was real and that I also had ADD and was bipolar. Despite all that I am still surviving and I will be 40 in about a week. But I digress.. I just wanted to relay that there are so many of us out here and if your "lucky" to be on the older side of things its been a long time hiding out and trying to get by without letting anyone know that your have a LD that goes past just being in school. Thanks again.

    • profile image

      amithist 7 years ago

      Amen!!! Thank you soo much for sharing

      I use to call myself verbally-numerically dyslexic..Learning left from right literally took years and I still have to wear a Ring on my Right hand. I also still swap my letters and words ie .The bogs are darking.. and when writing its the s,d,b,n,m and so on that get me. It took many years to learn to touch type but at least ppl can read most of what I write now.

      AdHD didn't exist when I was in school. It was called unteachable, lack of motivation and so on. I didn't find out till my early 30s that I my dyslexia was real and that I also had ADD and was bipolar. Despite all that I am still surviving and I will be 40 in about a week. But I digress.. I just wanted to relay that there are so many of us out here and if your "lucky" to be on the older side of things its been a long time hiding out and trying to get by without letting anyone know that your have a LD that goes past just being in school. Thanks again.

    • sdakin profile image

      sdakin 7 years ago

      Oh my goodness! I had never heard of it, but I swear it describes me! I can do the music, maps & phone numbers. However, I have serious problems judging distances (or amounts for that matter), and my math answers would always come out different every time. My husband and I joke that I'm spatially challenged - loading the dishwasher doesn't always work out as well for me as it does for him. Thanks for the great information!

    • profile image

      happynutritionist 7 years ago

      I'm commenting again, not sure the first one went through:-) This is interesting, I've never heard of this before. Congrats on being LOTD! ~claudia

    • profile image

      bonchic 7 years ago

      If anyone has a child age 7-12 who can talk about their dyscalculia, we'd love to hear from you.

      Major Cable Television Network Documentary; Emmy-winning filmmakers

      LDFILM@aol.com

    • paperfacets profile image

      Sherry Venegas 7 years ago from La Verne, CA

      Congratulaions LotD. Deserved, that's for sure with this lens.

    • Addy Bell profile image
      Author

      Addy Bell 7 years ago

      @Abseaz LM: Please feel free to contact me if I can be of any help in your research.

    • Addy Bell profile image
      Author

      Addy Bell 7 years ago

      @joanhall: I was with you until you threw the number at me :)

    • profile image

      DeborahLynne 7 years ago

      This is the first time I have ever heard of dyscalculia.

      My niece has a learning disorder called central audio processing disorder (CAPD) and has received specialized classroom aid that has really helped her.

      I worked for years as a teller in a local bank. I never had any major problems with math although I did struggle in fifth grade with the memorization of the timeâs tables, and to this day still don't know them. The biggest challenge I faced as a teller was remembering names and faces and putting the two together. The bank where I worked kept transferring me from one branch to another (7 total) and just as I would begin to match the names to the faces, they would transfer me to another branch and I would have to start all over again.

      Thank you for a great informative article. Debbie

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      Pretty much the best lense I've come across. I could always do basic math, accounting, and use math formulas if it was one I use over and over. But anything Algebra and above just blew my mind. I even went to an art college where we didn't have to take math.

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      Superb! Kudos on this topic. I'll always be eternally grateful to you for putting this out there.. You've explained everything. Your sense of humor is my cup of tea. It's exactly how I've coped all these years. And SOLUTIONS...... and HOPE.

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      From your description, I definitely have dyscalculia. Maybe I know someone who does. I feel, if I address my concerns, I can model that. Yes, I never heard of this, though I've lived it. I'll try your ideas & let you know how it worked.

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      I'm dyscalculic and it's SUCH a relief to finally KNOW it's not my fault! Great article; hits home on every paragraph!

    • profile image

      paschar 7 years ago

      I`m Glad to view a lens from one who is getting the word out to others that those like us have good reasons for having problems with math , recent research has shown proof of Dyscalculia being strongly related to Dyslexia and other reading problems related to strephosymbolia (reading backwards ) making objects appear as if in a mirror , love this lens.

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      hey! just wanted to say thank you. I'm doing a research paper, and this was by FAR the most interesting and informative source I've been able to find. I know you're an English buff, but I dreeeeeaaaddd researching and writing papers. thanks for making it fun!

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      Thank you for this. I have dyscalculia and dysgraphia and I struggle through every day of my life with it. I just started college again at 25 and im pulling a 3.6 GPA till I started basic math. Im stressed constantly with people in class saying that its so easy but its not....I had my first math class today and I was in tears at the end of it because I took forever to do addition. This article made me feel better.

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR THIS. IT MADE ME CRY BECAUSE MY WHOLE LIFE I HAVE FEARED MATH. I WAS CALLED STUPID BY MY THIRD GRADE TEACHER BECAUSE I COULD NOT DO DIVISION. I WILL NEVER FORGET THAT. NO ONE COULD EVER UNDERSTAND WHY I DID SO WELL IN EVERY SINGLE SUBJECT EXCEPT MATH. I ALMOST DID NOT GRADUATE HIGHSCHOOL BECAUSE I COULD NOT PASS THE REQUIURED MATH CLASSESS. THANK YOU FOR BEING THE VOICE FOR EVERYONE THAT HAS DYSCALCULIA!!!

    • Wednesday-Elf profile image

      Wednesday-Elf 6 years ago from Savannah, Georgia

      Stopping back by to wish you a Happy One-Year Anniversary of this wonderful lens. I'm delighted it has received the recognition and visits it so deserves, as you have performed a real service sharing your experiences with dyscalculia to help others. From the response, you have enlightened and helped many who were struggling with dyscalculia without knowing what it was or how to cope. You've done an excellent job and are to be congratulated for reaching out to others who needed to have this information. Well done, my dear!

    • LadyLovelace LM profile image

      LadyLovelace LM 6 years ago

      THANK YOU. I have been looking for an actual name to put to what I have been referring to as 'numerical dyslexia' for years, and now I know. Today, you are my hero.

    • Wednesday-Elf profile image

      Wednesday-Elf 6 years ago from Savannah, Georgia

      This lens was so special.... and I'm POSITIVE (especially from the comments left on this page) that it has helped a great many people understand those with dyscalculia, plus helped those afflicted with it identify what they might not have known had a name. "What the Heck is Dyscalculia" is very well deserving of the special awards (blessings and LOTD) it has received. On Sept. 1st I was granted a special privilege for a month -- SquidAngel Wings -- therefore, I have returned once again to add my ~~SquidAngel Blessing~~ to this outstanding lens.!

    • Addy Bell profile image
      Author

      Addy Bell 6 years ago

      @Wednesday-Elf: Thank you so much for the blessing! And for all of the typos you've caught for me over the months :)

    • Addy Bell profile image
      Author

      Addy Bell 6 years ago

      @LadyLovelace LM: I'm so glad I could help. Knowing really does help.

    • profile image

      Fit_Over_40_Buzz 6 years ago

      This is a great lens. Thanks for making it. Very informative. I gave you a thumbs up

      cause I like your lens.

    • DecoratingEvents profile image

      DecoratingEvents 6 years ago

      Excellent lens. Sometimes people quickly jump to conclusions about disabilities -- maybe they will learn something from this!

    • JenOfChicago LM profile image

      JenOfChicago LM 6 years ago

      Congrats on your purple star! Thank you for sharing your story with this lens.

    • Wednesday-Elf profile image

      Wednesday-Elf 6 years ago from Savannah, Georgia

      Hi Addy. A BIG congratulations on your Purple Star. Very well deserved and I'm delighted for you.

    • DecoratingEvents profile image

      DecoratingEvents 6 years ago

      Congratulations Addy! Well deserved and exciting!

    • justholidays profile image

      justholidays 6 years ago

      Congrats on your purple star, Addie!

    • jp1978 profile image

      jp1978 6 years ago

      I'm a college Physics instructor, and some of my students have serious difficulty with Math. We don't have the resources to diagnose learning disabilities, and I have so many students that I can't give them all one-on-one time. The students are in the Computer Science program, and they really do need to understand Math. What do you think is the best way to handle this?

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      @jp1978: As someone with what is probably mild/moderate dyscalculia (and who started out in a science/math heavy degree) I hate to say this, but those students may need to reconsider their programs. It's not that there aren't ways around the challenges, but for some I bet their strengths in other areas would far outweigh the battles ahead of them if they stay the course. If your school doesn't offer many resources, perhaps you could at least photocopy some of the dyscalculia symptoms, etc. and have them avail. on your wall/door, etc. You aren't qualified to diagnose something like this and you don't want to tell people they aren't capable of doing your program, but if they see themselves in the symptoms list, that might encourage them to re-think what they're doing and why. (Or at least look into it further.) Personally, I ended up changing majors and was shocked when my grades went from kill-myself-for-a-C (even a D sometimes) to regularly setting the class curve without breaking a sweat. The difference? I went with my strengths and math ain't it! =) lol

    • Addy Bell profile image
      Author

      Addy Bell 6 years ago

      @jp1978: I would say that unless there's a visual/concrete way to explain the math concepts these students need, als is right. These students may need to investigate a diagnosis on their own, or even reconsider their program. It's much better to choose something that employs one's strengths.

      If it's a simple question of these students having rusty math skills, then I would advise them to go to the university's tutoring center, or ask to be tutored by other students who are stronger in math.

    • jp1978 profile image

      jp1978 6 years ago

      @Addy Bell: Thank you both.

    • Sensitive Fern profile image

      Sensitive Fern 6 years ago

      I think I have dyscalculia. I do a lot of transposing or just not seeing things right. But I'm a very good musician, especially sight reading and fingering. I either have dyscalculia or I was traumatized in 2nd grade by learning the calculation tables and shut down. :)

    • KarenTBTEN profile image

      KarenTBTEN 6 years ago

      Back with a SquidAngel blessing... and a thought. I am not dyscalculic, but I have trouble with rows and lines when working with figures, and I can seriously have to check things 3 or 4 times. So... some tracking issues. And yet, with reading... no issues with tracking. There are studies where they deliberately alter text -- omitting and reversing things -- and proficient readers read through the errors. I believe they don't necessarily notice they're there -- they still make meaning from the text just the same. Some people wonder how a person can seem dyslexic with figures, but not writing. It appears that a person might, at the visual processing level, make just as many errors with reading -- but not be impeded with them.

    • Addy Bell profile image
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      Addy Bell 6 years ago

      @KarenTBTEN: I've read those altered text passages, and I have no trouble with them either. It's really interesting stuff. Thanks for the blessing!

    • Addy Bell profile image
      Author

      Addy Bell 6 years ago

      @Sensitive Fern: I think a lot of people were traumatized by learning calculation tables :)

    • ArdenBaird LM profile image

      ArdenBaird LM 6 years ago

      I've known for quite a while that I have a mild form or dyslexia. My spelling is atrocious and I often stop short when reading because what I thought I read didn't make sense.

      I've always thought I was a "number-phobe" ask me to do anything with numbers and my brain freezes. I never should have graduated high school because I only passed one test in Grade 11 Algebra. My teacher kept asking me why I couldn't do algebra. I only learned later that my IQ placed me in the "gifted" category so no one could figure out why I couldn't (and still can't) do math.

      I'm going to have to do some more reading on dyscalculia.

    • jgelien profile image

      jgelien 6 years ago

      Dyscalculia is new to me but I may actually have it. When I was a kid I seriously thought that the math part of my brain was missing. Quite an awful struggle. Thanks for the great information.

    • norma-holt profile image

      norma-holt 6 years ago

      Fascinating read and your writing skills are great. Featured this on What Do Genes Do. Top marks

    • profile image

      miaponzo 6 years ago

      My son has dyscalculia and while he struggles, it's not the end of the world :)

    • Wednesday-Elf profile image

      Wednesday-Elf 6 years ago from Savannah, Georgia

      You know I've always thought this lens was special! Now am returning to tell you that it has been 'featured on' and 'lensrolled to' my "SquidAngel Blessings by an Elf" lens. :-)

    • sorana lm profile image

      sorana lm 6 years ago

      Hi! Thank you so much for your wonderful comments on my Great Mathematicians lens. I have taught children with dyscalculia and you are so right: dyscalculia does not mean stupid. I am sure this lens will help others understand this learning disability. It is something that not too many people know about. Great lens.

    • LouisaDembul profile image

      LouisaDembul 6 years ago

      This is a very important topic, because it is little known. The more people know, the less children need to suffer!

    • profile image

      miaponzo 6 years ago

      My son has dyscalculia and he has struggled but he can do math in some forms :)

    • TapIn2U profile image

      TapIn2U 6 years ago

      You deserve every Squid Angel that you get because this lens is very informative and helpful! Children with Dyscalculia need all the help and support they can get. Great job! Sundae ;-)

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      This is like my life story. I especially liked the dumbest things people have said to me part..I have heard them all.

    • profile image

      MisTikkal 6 years ago

      I actually cried as I was reading this. A name for it at last and I had no idea. So much you say hit home. I could dance up a dream, but it was so hard to remember the long routines. Play the piano and flute, but only by ear (used to drive my teacher crazy cos he couldn't HA! lol); get lost with the best directions or have panic attacks; time is a problem; and basic maths <------- what's that? Did for a while data entry, but transposing was an issue plus it caused major migraines so did just about every math exam.

      However, just as you say, I excelled at Eng Lit, writing, theatre, singing and latterly, in my own way in art.

      Still wiping tears away here and sending you the biggest warmest cyber hug you have ever had. Thank you SOOOOOOOOO much for sharing this.

      As for you comments on Dilettante or Renaissance, yeah, arrogance takes many forms! Molding, and judging, being two of them.

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      Thank you,you have just described my 39 year old son,whose life is in turmoil because he cannot handle money,time or any of the things you described.He has been charged fees for overdrafts,cheated when paying for items,getting fired from perhaps hundreds of jobs ,etc.etcYes,he also is learning disabled,may have asperger's ans ADD.Thanks again,but where do we go from here?

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      I have been blogging about my own trouble with dyscalculia when I found your post. I can not believe how similar our stories are! I kept saying "Oh my god...me too!" the whole time. My family thought I was on the phone lol. Thanks for sharing!

    • Pat Broker profile image

      Pat Broker 6 years ago from Templeton, CA

      I've never heard of discalculia, even as an elementary teacher. Thanks for the info.

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      I'm convinced my 13 yr old son has this. I've never seen anyone work so hard at math and STILL not "get it". He uses his fingers to figure out 10 - 3, and is so far from having his multiplication tables memorized, at this point I've given up that it'll ever happen. He is on the Autism Spectrum (and is considered very high-functioning, and very bright in other areas), so many of his issues are attributed to that. But I'm absolutely convinced that he ALSO has dyscalculia - how does a 7th grader NOT know that 10-3 is 7? And that 10-7 is 3? Or that 7 + 3 is 10? For most people, it's ONE math triangle (3,7,10 and the various relationships). For him, it's 4 different, completely unrelated math sentences. I was happy to find your blog and read about this issue. Anything that helps me see the world through my son's eyes is absolutely appreciated. Thank you for that.

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      I'm convinced my 13 yr old son has this. I've never seen anyone work so hard at math and STILL not "get it". He uses his fingers to figure out 10 - 3, and is so far from having his multiplication tables memorized, at this point I've given up that it'll ever happen. He is on the Autism Spectrum (and is considered very high-functioning, and very bright in other areas), so many of his issues are attributed to that. But I'm absolutely convinced that he ALSO has dyscalculia - how does a 7th grader NOT know that 10-3 is 7? And that 10-7 is 3? Or that 7 + 3 is 10? For most people, it's ONE math triangle (3,7,10 and the various relationships). For him, it's 4 different, completely unrelated math sentences. I was happy to find your blog and read about this issue. Anything that helps me see the world through my son's eyes is absolutely appreciated. Thank you for that.

    • JakTraks profile image

      Jacqueline Marshall 6 years ago from Chicago area

      This has been very interesting. I have a quick mind that I thoroughly enjoy except for math. I look at numbers and turn "dumb." I know I'm not but that is how I feel. It could just be that I am "weak" at math but I've always wondered about it.

    • bikerchickie profile image

      bikerchickie 6 years ago

      I used to think I had dyscalculia because I used to inverse numbers all the time. 87 would become 78 and vice versa. Now I know better especially since I excelled in math in high school. I was raised in two languages, French and Dutch. In Dutch, one starts with the last number--we say "seven and eighty", whereas in French, one starts with the first--"eighty seven". (well, not quite as the word for eighty is "four twenties" in French, but that's another story). I think my brain gets confused, depending on which language I'm speaking.

    • profile image

      YourFirstTime 5 years ago

      I'm wondering if it's genetic. It has hit every generation of my family so far.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Thanks. A very imformative website. I believe I may have Dyscalculia. I am an adult college student about to graduate except for completing my algebra requirements. I am having a very difficult time understanding the concepts. I have excelled throughout the program with my GPA 4.0. However, when I am in class and the professor calls on my to answer -what seems to be a simple problem for the other students, I can't do it. I had a professor this week humiliate me in front of the entire class. I was mortified!

      I called my eye doctor this morning because I had eye surgery on both eyes for closed-angle glycoma a few years ago. His nurse said " your eyes have nothing to do with it". No matter how much or how hard I study, I am not getting it. This has been an issue my entire life with math.However, the odd thing is I understand time, recall phone numbers and basic math . I get 2+2=4 and 4-2=2 Mine just seems to be when it goes beyond the basics. Help!!!!! Any knowledge or suggestions would be appreciated!

    • Addy Bell profile image
      Author

      Addy Bell 5 years ago

      @anonymous: I'm so sorry your professor humiliated you. As for suggestions ... I wish I had some. I can't do math very well beyond dingle digit operations.

      You say that you can remember phone numbers -- does this mean that you don't invert digits? If you use a calculator, can you type the numbers accurately? It might not help with your prof, but at least it would improve your ability to deal with numbers in general.

      Good luck!

    • David Dove profile image

      David Dove 5 years ago

      And I thought it was just me.... excellent awareness raising lens, thank you.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Thank you! This is great. I have known for years that I have dyscalculia, but am only beginning to explore what that means beyond just being bad at math. I really relate to a lot of your stories and examples of how dyscalculia can affect everyday life.

      I question your phrasing, though, when you say, "If you didn't go to bed every night of your childhood believing you were hopelessly stupid, if you don't have panic attacks every time you have to figure out how much to tip your server, if nobody has ever asked you just how dumb are you, really? when it's taking you too long to find the correct change, you do not know how it feels to have dyscalculia." Some of these things have happened to me, but not all. Tips and change are hard, but I was good enough at other things that I didn't feel stupid most of the time. Elsewhere on this lens you emphasize that the symptoms are different for everyone, and I think that in this section you lose sight of that a little.

      Overall, this is a great resource! Thank you!

    • GonnaFly profile image

      Jeanette 5 years ago from Australia

      Just returning to drop a little blessing on this lens and to let you know it has been added to my best maths resources lens.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      I'm 51 and have had a very difficult time with math beyond addition and subtraction--I can't remember a time when I didn't. Without a calculator, I can't even do long division. All the usual commentary throughout my elementary, highschool and college years has been the same; "Apply yourself", "Well, you're just going to have to learn it". I never graduated from college because it. I've tried going back to school over and over and the ultimate result is always the same. I once brought up the concept of dyscalculia to a college pre-algebra teacher who laughed at the idea--thanks...teaching is such a noble profession. I don't have insurance because I've always had to settle for crappy jobs--I don't have the resources to get diagnosed. People are, without fail, surprised at my deficiency:"You? Naw! No way, you're one of the smartest guys I know!" I've heard that more than a few times over the years. I'm presently in a program in a community college that I'm about to be failed out of because they don't permit calculators in exams. I know the formulas by heart and always arrive at the correct answers--with a calculator. I'm doing well in all other components of the program, but this do me in. At this late stage in my life, I think I'm pretty much screwed. No one wants to hear about the problems of middle-aged people; we're supposed to have it together,right?

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      I want to recommend a new product for the dyscalculia treatment - Dyscalculia No More review

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Oh my goodness. This is me. I have had problems with math my whole life! I never made it past long division and I've spent my entire life working really hard to conceal it. I always get nagged to "make sure I get the correct change back" when I buy something but I don't. So I get screwed out of a few cents-it's better than my secret coming out. I also don't tip servers because it's too much work to figure out what to leave-no I don't care if that's "polite". It's how I cope. I don't ever want to sit in a restaurant forever just to calculate a tip. So yeah. I also never learned to read an analog clock (I grew up in the 90's before digital clocks), and got cut down numerous times by my dad and yelled at all because I couldn't read an analog clock. I too have been told that I "could excel at math if I tried", that I'm "retarded", I should "go kill myself" because of being so "retarded", and all kinds of other mean stuff. It's hard being a discalculic. :(

    • profile image

      woracal 5 years ago

      @anonymous: I think you're talking about this product: http://dyscalculianomore.com

      I know someone who has tried it. they seem to be quite happy.

    • yayas profile image

      yayas 5 years ago

      I have Dyslexia an' some of the other invisible syndromes, but Dyscalculia has not been one of my difficulties; thank goodness! I can't begin to imagine how much more of a struggle life would be with the added challenge of such pro'lems. Sometimes, I annoy myself because I count everything as I move through life; stairs, beats in a song, syllables in words... that sorta' thing. An' I always thought THAT was a problem. I think I can handle too much counting far better than I could handle having to struggle with so much of life because numbers create pro'lems. Thank you for writing this page an' helping us all to un'erstan' Dyscalculia better.

      Thank you for your visits to My Favorite Camping Sites and Home Décor an' Children Afflicted With Autism pages. I also appreciate your Angel Blessing on the camping sites page.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      This is awesome u are a life saver and I thank u so very much for shedding light on this disorder!!!

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      I'm 47 and have never know what dyscalculia was. But, guess what- I don't need any testing- I've got it! When I grew up you were just a bubble head/ space cadet/ kinda cute and stupid. I was a small blonde girl so people just laughed it off and i guess I just figured they were right. I am a professional artist by the way- which also fits the profile that you have described.

      These are the difficulties that I have that I think are a result of dyscalculia-

      -No sense of direction

      -Can't spell

      -Of course, am terrified of any math- thank god I can count on my fingers

      -Could never learn another language until I discovered American Sign Language which is a visual ,tactile, and emotionally readable language

      -Could never learn to read music or understand harmony

      -Can't read a map

      -In order to clean up I must take one object, at a time, and put it in its place or I get confused and overwhelmed

      -I have no sense of time and am always a bit late and am surprised every time!

      -Can't plan a schedule or really anything in my head. I have to write it down- usually on my hand or I loose the paper.

      Anyway, you have enlightened this former ditz as to why I am so "stupid" about so many things. I am not stupid at all. I just can't do them because no one knew what dyscalcula was when I was growing up. THANKS! Lori

    • profile image

      DifferentPerspective 5 years ago

      I'm curious about how you told your parents. Did they accept it? Obviously, you've dealt with some unbelievers. What kind of percentage believe when you explain, and what percentage at least understands the basics?

    • Addy Bell profile image
      Author

      Addy Bell 5 years ago

      @DifferentPerspective: My parents knew I was having myself tested, so I told them when I got the results. I was expecting them to be happy, because we finally had an answer for why math class had been such a misery. Instead I was met with awkward silence.

      Oddly, over the past few years, I *think* my mother has been attempting to be supportive ... whenever I mention "being bad at math" or "I can't do math", she says "me too". Of course, this is a woman who had to pass a fairly advanced stats course in grad school, so I'm not sure what she's on about, but I'll take what I can get.

    • profile image

      HopeArcher 5 years ago

      Wow. I never knew there was such thing. I'm so glad i found this lens.

    • profile image

      HopeArcher 5 years ago

      Wow. I never knew there was such thing. I'm so glad i found this lens.

    • Angelina Gherna profile image

      Angelina 5 years ago from California

      very interesting

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Hi There! I told my mom about this dyscalculia thingy because i've read the lens most of the symptoms are correct about me having dyscalculia but the moment i told my mom she was like 'are you that desperate telling me all those things just to made me believe that you're not that stupid why you faied your maths'? I feel sad and unsupported. May i know how do you told you're parents and how did they accepted it? Thank you. This has been a great help.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Hi There! I told my mom about this dyscalculia thingy because i've read the lens most of the symptoms are correct about me having dyscalculia but the moment i told my mom she was like 'are you that desperate telling me all those things just to made me believe that you're not that stupid why you faied your maths'? I feel sad and unsupported. May i know how do you told you're parents and how did they accepted it? Thank you. This has been a great help.

    • profile image

      Success_At_School 4 years ago

      You made me laugh and educated me at the same time.

    • profile image

      adrian-beckett-7 4 years ago

      I'm a dyscalculia tutor. A couple of years ago I had little idea about dyscalculia. This lens helped me heaps.

    • profile image

      hinawaseem 4 years ago

      its really nice work,

    • sagebrushmama profile image

      sagebrushmama 4 years ago

      Exceptional lens...I've been out of the classroom since my oldest child was born, so I missed learning about discalculia in my teaching days...my Mom was more exposed to the awareness of it...she and I both taught middle school math. She did a lot of manipulative work.

      Loved learning about this from an insider's perspective, it's very interesting and it makes a lot of sense. Hope to read more of your lenses.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I HAVE IT. I'm trying to find a job where I don't have to do accounting. It is very difficult. I need to be retrained, but there isn't much out there where I don't have to do math! Arrgghh!

      At least now it's formally identified. Thanks for this lens because you very articulately stated what it is like to have this. I'm going to post it on Facebook so people I know will stop saying those six things!

    • RationalHedonist profile image

      RationalHedonist 4 years ago

      I think back to grade school when I was doing addition and subtraction on the ruler or my fingers because numbers wouldn't stay still in my head and I needed to make it visible to see or feel them. Later, I'd stare blankly at at all those a's, b's, c's and x's in algebra and came up with some good artwork on the back of tests, wasting time since I was unable to actually do the test. I could do math on a calculator when I didn't reverse or mix them up. My poor dad worked so many hours with me to help. I got good grades in everything else, but I just felt dumb. I found out I had dyscalculia in college, so when I had to take Statistics for my Psychology major, I had a super patient tutor who helped me daily , plus it was the first time those abstract letter formulas were replaced by actual numbers, I got an A+ when I'd had D-'s in past algebra courses. I wish teachers had known about it when I was going through school. Thanks for a great topic so more people can be aware.

    • verymary profile image

      Mary 4 years ago from Chicago area

      I didn't know much about this before -- thanks for the great info! It's one thing to be not great at math, another to truly not understand it. I feel for all the schoolkids suffering from this!

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Wow - so very thankful you make this post. I had such difficulty with math that I programmed my computer to do my homework for me - back in 1982 when I was a senior in high school. I knew I wasn't dumb, because I understood it enough to tell my computer exactly what to do with any problem I put in, and the answers were right when I printed them out. But to physically write down problems? No way. Not if it involved numbers or location-specific symbols. I passed my basic college algebra course by one point, but it enabled me to complete my teaching certificate. I went on to be a Spanish teacher, where I rarely had to physically write down a number. I'm so relieved there's someone else out there who knows what this is like. Thanks again for writing about your experiences.

    • profile image

      lisa-chanter 4 years ago

      I would firstly like to thank you your great I have felt sooooo stupid for so long and I felt like I was reading about myself when i read this it is all so frustrating I know there are so many things I could of achieved if I was not terrified of numbers I am supposed to be going for training with a company soon and they informed me on Thursday that I will have to take a maths test I can feel the whole thing slipping through my fingers now I would really like to get a diagnosis and some help with this if there is any although I am very happy I am not alone with this it has really knocked my confidence over the years and made my life very difficult and it is so hard to avoid numbers and is getting harder most of the jobs I'm applying for want you to take a test as standard.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I do suffer from Dyscalculia. I need a paper and a pencil and a lot of time. Lots of time.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Hi as you can see I only found out a little while ago, but it has been such a relief since to know you are not alone and this blog was amazing :-)

    • mcspocky lm profile image

      mcspocky lm 4 years ago

      I had never heard of Dyscalculia before, so this lens was full of new information for me. Very well done, and thanks for sharing.

    • yonique88 profile image

      yonique88 4 years ago

      I have never heard of the learning disability Dyscalculia. I had done fairly well to poorly in my Maths classes but did very well in my other subjects. I seem to be absent minded and I get lost easily too. I can be absent-minded at times. I can't visualize numbers in my head. I have to write all of my calculations down in order to do it properly. I believe that I have this disorder. I can't do a complicated Math problem like algebra until I have done it repeatedly. If I have not done it for quite a while, I forget. Thanks for sharing your story. It has really helped me.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      great article.....i, too, wondered why i was so bad in math during school....i remember my dad trying to explain my math to me at night and i would be in tears....and he would say, why can't you remember...i just told you how to do it last night!.......years later i was researching dyslexia because my 5 year old son was having trouble reading....i came across dyscalculia....i had never heard this term before but as i read it, all down the page, i kept saying, that's me...that's me...that's me.......when the full realization came that all my "stupidity" was because of a learning disability, i cried!!......i finally had an answer...a reason....i wasn't stupid at all.....oh i was so relieved!..........people don't understand why things are so difficult for me....like making lists and sticking to a schedule and waiting 'til the last minute to get things done and getting a meal together so that all the foods are done at the same time.....and bills and a budget.....and the list goes on as you well know.....i am constantly hunting for new, better ways to do things.....and i still struggle!

    • profile image

      jprimus 3 years ago

      very interesting lens I was not aware of this condition at all...

    • profile image

      kynsicat 3 years ago

      Thanks so much for this article. I almost started crying reading it since I immediately recognized myself and my struggles.

    • profile image

      Sara 2 years ago

      Thank you, thank you, thank you. I am in tears...I am almost 39 years old and I now understand why I have struggled so much all these years. I have every single symptom of Dyscalculia. My question is, how do I go about getting diagnosed? Do I talk to my doctor?

    • profile image

      Dale 22 months ago

      I know this article is rather old, but it really says what I have been trying to articulate for numerous years. I am still traumatized from growing up with this problem and being yelled at by my Dad and teachers for not being able to count change fast enough for him, not being able to learn card games he thought were "easy", I still can't figure out how to play Euchre, why I couldn't and still can't figure out "easy" Algebra, and the list goes on. I get tired of being called "stupid" even though I scored 150 on the IQ test and have a Master's degree. I would have scored higher, but I couldn't do the math section . I finally learned how to work around it and let others do the math for me.

      Thanks again for such a frank and honest article.

    • profile image

      Felicity 18 months ago

      First of all, it has been 5 years since you orriginally posted your lens. It hasn't tarnished or lost any of its lustre..or is it luster.. ( sorry my dyscalculia makes me suck at spelling ) i often feel like the goose in Charolette's web.. Who would go...double ee, double i, double o,o,u...But this comment isn't about ME or how dyscalculia has affected or effected??? Me..., it's about YOU and how you have affected or effected?? Such a HUGE change in the world. Thank you again!

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