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Sunglasses Do Protect Your Eyes!

Updated on September 10, 2014

Why use sunglasses

Why shall we use sunglasses? To look smart or to BE smart? Our fragile eyes need the protection and we should provide it when we can. This lens will bring out the medical and physical reasons to use sun protection for your eyes.

Of course smart business men know that we want them and they do all they can to make us buy their brand mark. At the end of the lens is a link to all the known brand marks =D - But the truth is, that an ordinary kind can be just as good when it comes to protection. OK if you want the latest and can afford it - go for it.


Be kind to yourself - protect your eyes UVA/B

UVA/B

Impact-Resistant

Polarized

Scratch-Resistant

UVC

What does this mean?

Sunglasses or sun glasses are a visual aid, variously termed spectacles or glasses, which feature lenses that are coloured or darkened to prevent strong light from reaching the eyes.

Many people find direct sunlight too bright to be comfortable, especially when reading from paper in direct sunlight. In outdoor activities like riding, skiing and flying, the eye can receive more light than usual. It has been recommended to wear these kind of glasses whenever outside to protect the eyes from ultraviolet radiation, which can lead to the development of a cataract. Sunglasses have also been associated with celebrities and film actors primarily due to the desire to mask identity, but in part due to the lighting involved in production typically being stronger than natural light and uncomfortable to the naked eye.

Find your glasses on Amazon - there are many

You choose!

Are you a sunglass user?

Are sun glasses important?

See results

Polarization - protect your eyes UVA/B

Polarization

Light waves from the sun, or even from an artificial light source such as a light bulb, vibrate and radiate outward in all directions. Whether the light is transmitted, reflected, scattered or refracted, when its vibrations are aligned into one or more planes of direction, the light is said to be polarized. Polarization can occur either naturally or artificially. You can see an example of natural polarization every time you look at a lake. The reflected glare off the surface is the light that does not make it through the "filter" of the water, and is the reason why you often cannot see anything below the surface, even when the water is very clear.

Only the part of the light wave that is not aligned with the slots in the filter can pass through. Everything else is absorbed. The light coming through the filter is considered polarized.

A lot of sunglasses advertised as polarizing actually are not. There's a simple test you can perform before you buy them to make sure. Find a reflective surface, and hold the glasses so that you are viewing the surface through one of the lenses. Now slowly rotate the glasses to a 90-degree angle, and see if the reflective glare diminishes or increases. If the sunglasses are polarized, you will see a significant diminishing of the glare.

Horatio Caine uses sunglasses!

Horatio Caine uses sunglasses!
Horatio Caine uses sunglasses!

Protect your eyes with Photochromic Sunglasses

Photochromic Sunglasses

Sunglasses or prescription eyeglasses that darken when exposed to the sun are called photochromic, or sometimes photochromatic. Developed by Corning in the late 1960s and popularized by Transitions in the 1990s, photochromic lenses rely on a specific chemical reaction to UV radiation. Photochromic lenses have millions of molecules of substances, such as silver chloride or silver halide, embedded in them. The molecules are transparent to visible light in the absence of UV light, which is the normal makeup of artificial lighting. But when exposed to UV rays in sunlight, the molecules undergo a chemical process that causes them to change shape. The new molecular structure absorbs portions of the visible light, causing the lenses to darken. The number of the molecules that change shape varies with the intensity of the UV rays.

Poll - you and the sun

Is the sun really harmful for the eyes

See results

Download a Mp3 - book and listen!

with your sunglasses on =)

Sherlock Holmes: The Sign of the Four (mp3)

The great detective's melancholy mood is lifted by the arrival of attractive Mary Morstan at 221B, Baker Street.

The sun is shining - what do you do?

Buy new sunglasses this year?

See results

Seven favourties

1. Ray Ban

2. Yves saint Laurant

3. Tom Ford

4. Ralf Lauren

5. Efva Attling

6. Ralf Lauren

7. Armani

Try EBay for you new glasses

If you want to you can buy more than one pair :)

How much fun you can have with sunglasses - These guys must have been practicing for years?

Bobbing for glasses

Comments

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    • profile image

      GrowWear 

      7 years ago

      My eyes are very sensitive to light, and sunglasses help. ...I like sunglasses, but not nearly as much as those guys in the videos. :)

    • profile image

      GabrielaFargasch 

      7 years ago

      Nice lens!!

    working

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