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Plantar Fasciitis Treatment

Updated on August 1, 2011

What is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis (fash-ee-EYE-tiss) is an injury of the heel that can cause mild to severe pain for an extended period of time. The foot has a tough tissue called the "plantar fascia" that connects the heel to the base of the toes. Plantar fasciitis is actually an overuse-type of injury that occurs at the base of the plantar fascia at the heel.

What are the symptoms?

Plantar Fasciitis sufferers experience pain on the bottom of their foot in the heel area which quite often feels like a bruise. The pain may be dull to non-existent when sitting or laying down, and flares up when any weight is put on the foot by walking or running.

A short or long rest period will help a bit, but the pain will generally reoccur quickly when attempting to walk or run.

In the early stages of Plantar Fasciitis, the pain will generally be felt after exercise -- not during the exercise itself.

If left untreated, it can become a chronic condition and can cause a host of other medical issues. People with Plantar Fasciitis tend to favor the affected foot when walking or exercising which can cause additional leg, hip, knee or back problems over time.

What causes Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar Fasciitis is caused by excessive walking, standing or running, particularly under certain conditions.

A runner who runs on a flat track could be less likely to develop the condition than someone who runs on hilly or uneven ground. Someone who does a lot of walking in thin-soled shoes or sandals could be more likely to develop it than someone who walks in sturdy walking shoes or athletic shoes.Something as simple as a few hours walking or standing on gravel in thin-soled shoes or sandals could also cause Plantar Fasciitis.

The people who are more prone to develop Plantar Fasciitis are:

  • women
  • people who are overweight
  • people whose job requires a lot of walking or standing
  • athletes
  • people with tight calf muscles
  • people with extremely high arches
  • people who run or walk frequently for exercise

Is Plantar Fasciitis treatment possible?

Plantar fasciitis treatment generally involves specific exercises over a period of time, but the condition is treatable. Before beginning treatment for Plantar Fasciitis, it is wise to consult your doctor first. Common treatments include:

After two to three months of treatment, the Plantar Fasciitis should signifcantly improve. If it does not, be sure to consult your doctor or orthopedist. He or she will most likely advise you to:

  • Wear night splints designed to stretch the plantar fascia
  • Wear a walking cast for a few weeks
  • Begin a round of steroidal anti-inflammatory medications, usually Cortizone injections directly into the heel

How to Effectively Treat Plantar Fasciitis

Comments

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    • profile image

      linda kettle 

      6 years ago

      For plantar facitis smear magnoplasm on heal and arch and bandage for 72 hrs changing dressing every 12 hrs. pain will be reduced by 80%. works well. if pain returns, repeat.

    • sfpodiatrist profile image

      sfpodiatrist 

      6 years ago from San Francisco

      Thanks for the response:) Does the Dr. Weil line require a prescription?

    • lrohner profile imageAUTHOR

      lrohner 

      6 years ago from USA

      SFPodiatrist - I would say something like Crocs would work fine. But really, anything with good support is a must. The Dr. Weil line has a lot of good options for people with plantar fasciitis too.

    • sfpodiatrist profile image

      sfpodiatrist 

      6 years ago from San Francisco

      Hi,

      You mentioned wearing sturdy shoes. Is there a brand or type you recommend?

      Thanks for the great Hub!

    • hazelbrown profile image

      hazelbrown 

      7 years ago from Central PA

      Thanks for this great hub! The video was really helpful too.

    • lrohner profile imageAUTHOR

      lrohner 

      9 years ago from USA

      It was my first time getting it too, although I at least knew how to treat since my daughter had it a few years ago. Good luck and speedy recovery!

    • wannabwestern profile image

      Carolyn Augustine 

      9 years ago from Iowa

      Wow, I have been having this problem too. Never had a problem before now. Thanks for the information.

    • lrohner profile imageAUTHOR

      lrohner 

      9 years ago from USA

      House slippers? Good Lord! I got it from spending 2 hours last Saturday and 3 hours last Sunday at the dog park. Problem was, for the first time ever I wore flip-flops there and the dog park is covered in gravel! Hope you stay plantar fasciitis-free and give your friend my best wishes for a speedy recovery!

    • profile image

      wordscribe41 

      9 years ago

      Oh, great hub Irohner. I've had trouble with this on and off for years. It really is a nightmare. The doctor told me to put inserts into my shoes, did I do it? NO. Go figure, keeps coming back. Sorry you've had it, it does take a while to heal. Hang in there. My best friend has it right now from walking around in her house slippers too much. Goober!

    • lrohner profile imageAUTHOR

      lrohner 

      9 years ago from USA

      Thanks, Nelle. I wish your sister and friends a speedy recovery as well.

    • profile image

      Nelle Hoxie 

      9 years ago

      My sister and several friends have suffered for months with this. I hope that you recover quickly.

    • Gypsy Willow profile image

      Gypsy Willow 

      9 years ago from Lake Tahoe Nevada USA , Wales UK and Taupo New Zealand

      Thanks for answering my query.. I appreciate it.

    • lrohner profile imageAUTHOR

      lrohner 

      9 years ago from USA

      My daughter has actually had this in the past, and I am suffering from it now.

      No. Plantar fasciitis is a problem with the plantar fascia, similar to a ligament. Nothing is broken or torn. Although the pain from PF can feel similar to that of a broken bone in the heel or a heel spur, the treatment is pretty different.

    • Gypsy Willow profile image

      Gypsy Willow 

      9 years ago from Lake Tahoe Nevada USA , Wales UK and Taupo New Zealand

      Thanks for this info. Does it still apply if the pain is caused by a broken bone in the heel?

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