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Bhai Dooj (2017) - Hindu Festival - Festivals of India

Updated on June 25, 2017
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Rajan is a botany and chemistry major. He has worked as a poultry breeder for 23 years, breeding layer and broiler parents.

Bhai Dooj Date 2017

Bhai Dooj this year is on 21 October 2017

In Nepal Seven Colored Tikka Is Put On The Forehead
In Nepal Seven Colored Tikka Is Put On The Forehead | Source

About Bhai Dooj

Bhai Dooj is a Hindu festival that is celebrated in India, Nepal and other countries where Hindus reside. It is celebrated on the last and 5th day of Diwali festival, which is a 5-day celebration and on the 2nd day after Diwali.

Bhai Dooj is called :

  • Bhai Tiika in Nepal and is the second most important festival after Vijayadashmi.
  • Bhau Beej in Maharastra state of India and in the Konkan region.
  • Bhai Phota in Bengal state of India.

Bhai Dooj is a Hindu festival celebrated by sisters by praying for the long, happy and healthy life of their brothers. Prayers are offered to Lord Yama, the God Of Death, for their safety. After this they perform aarti of their brothers and then apply Tilak or Tika on their foreheads.
Tilak is a mark made by applying a paste of vermillion, a red powder with some grains of rice.

Sweets and specially prepared dishes are then offered to the brothers. Brothers in return give blessings and gifts to the sisters.

In Nepal, sisters apply a seven colored tikka on their brother's forehead.


A Nepali Boy With Tilak On His Forehead
A Nepali Boy With Tilak On His Forehead | Source

Legends Associated With Bhai Dooj Celebrations

Legend 1.

Lord Yama, the God of death, has a sister Yamuna who wanted her brother to come to her house every year and partake goodies prepared by her. Lord Yama being very busy with noting down the deaths of human beings somehow was not able to fulfil the wish of his sister Yamuna.

Yamuna was very upset with this and one year she didn't invite Lord Yama. On realizing this, Lord Yama was overcome with feelings of guilt and to make amends he planned a surprise visit to his sister's house just after the Diwali festivities were over. Since Yama was visiting his sister that day no one died.

Seeing her brother Yamuna was overjoyed. She prepared sweets and goodies for him and prayed for her brother Lord Yama's long life. She then asked him to visit her every year on this day.

Ever since, this Hindu festival is being celebrated by sisters as Bhai dooj. Brothers too wait, as eagerly as their sisters, for this day.

Legend 2.

Another legend has it that Lord Krishna visited his sister Subhadra after slaying the demon Narkasur. His sister welcomed him with sweets and applied tilak on his forehead. Many believe this started the celebration of this Hindu festival.

Bhai Dooj strengthens the bond of love between brothers and sisters.

In India, there are 2 Hindu festivals that celebrate the bond of love between a brother and sister. One is Raksha Bandhan or Rakhi and the other is Bhai Dooj.

© 2012 Rajan Singh Jolly

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    • rajan jolly profile image
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      Rajan Singh Jolly 4 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

      Glad you like the information on this Indian festival. Thanks for stopping by, LKMore.

    • LKMore01 profile image

      LKMore01 4 years ago

      Thank you for sharing this information, Rajan. We have many Indian families in my community. My siblings and I are very close but we've never had a festival like Bhai Dooj to honor our relationship. Thank you for inspiring us to celebrate in our own way.

    • rajan jolly profile image
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      Rajan Singh Jolly 4 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

      Rebecca, Bhai Dooj is a very important festival as well. I'm glad you like the information.

    • rebeccamealey profile image

      Rebecca Mealey 4 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA

      Interesting legends! This sounds like a sweet and loving festival for families. thanks for teaching us about Bhai Dooj.

    • rajan jolly profile image
      Author

      Rajan Singh Jolly 4 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

      Thanks Indian Chef.

    • Indian Chef profile image

      Indian Chef 4 years ago from New Delhi India

      Very Nicely written Hub. voting up and sharing

    • rajan jolly profile image
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      Rajan Singh Jolly 4 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

      Thanks Bineet. Glad you like it.

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      Bineet Ojha 4 years ago

      Hey, thanks for including my nephew's photo.

    • rajan jolly profile image
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      Rajan Singh Jolly 4 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

      Devika, India is probably heading the list of countries with the most diverse festivals and customs. I'm glad you have been enjoying these festival hubs. Thanks for stopping by.

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 4 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Incredible and unique, a very creative way of life, and the Indian culture has many different customs. Thanks for sharing this information. Voted up

    • rajan jolly profile image
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      Rajan Singh Jolly 4 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

      It feels nice reading that this info makes for better understanding of this aspect of human relations in Indian culture. Thanks for reading, Patricia.

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 4 years ago from sunny Florida

      Thank you for sharing this. I had not heard of this. What a lovely way to honor a loved one. This helps me understand the relationship between sisters and brothers that I did not know of among my Indian friends. :) ps

    • rajan jolly profile image
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      Rajan Singh Jolly 4 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

      Thanks for your input Marlene. I'm glad you like the festival information. Thanks for dropping in.

    • MarleneB profile image

      Marlene Bertrand 4 years ago from Northern California, USA

      Well, now this would explain why sisters and brothers are so close. Some of my Indian in-laws, as much as possible, follow a lot of Indian celebrations and traditions. I noticed how their children are close and loving toward each other. Now I can see why. I really enjoyed the legends shared here. Whichever legend is believed, either way it is all about love.

    • rajan jolly profile image
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      Rajan Singh Jolly 4 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

      It is a time for celebration and joy too, Millionaire Tips. Thanks for coming by.

    • Millionaire Tips profile image

      Shasta Matova 4 years ago from USA

      I think it is great that there is a celebration of brothers and sisters. It looks like a lot of fun. Voted up.

    • rajan jolly profile image
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      Rajan Singh Jolly 4 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

      @ Peggy - Nice to learn you liked the hub. Yes indeed the participants were having good fun. Not a serious festival though. Thanks fror the read and sharing.

      @ tim-tim - Glad you like the info about this Indian tradition. Thanks for visiting.

    • tim-tim profile image

      Priscilla Chan 4 years ago from Normal, Illinois

      Sweet! Love to learn about other culture! Very interesting! Thanks.

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 4 years ago from Houston, Texas

      I am enjoying learning about such things as Bhai Dooj from reading your hubs. I think that it is a wonderful tradition encouraging the extra bonding between sisters and brothers. In the video, it looked like the participants were having fun with it. Up, interesting and sharing this.

    • rajan jolly profile image
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      Rajan Singh Jolly 4 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

      Hi Sangeeta,

      I'm glad you like the hub. Thanks for reading.

    • geetbhim profile image

      sangeeta verma 4 years ago from Ludhiana India

      Hi rajan!

      Like the presentation of your hub. I was unaware that it is celebrated in Bengal and Maharastra too. Thanks for the added information.

    • rajan jolly profile image
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      Rajan Singh Jolly 4 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

      @ shiningirisheyes - glad to know you enjoyed this information. Thanks for stopping by.

      @ Eiddwen - feels nice to be appreciated. Thanks for visiting.

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      Eiddwen 4 years ago from Wales

      So interesting and thanks Rajan;here's to so many more for us both to share on here.

      Eddy.

    • shiningirisheyes profile image

      Shining Irish Eyes 4 years ago from Upstate, New York

      Here is something about your world I never heard of and so enjoyed learning about. You are a wonderful teacher.

    • rajan jolly profile image
      Author

      Rajan Singh Jolly 4 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

      @ Bill - I can understand how alien all this must be sounding this to you so I appreciate your visit and comments all the more. Thanks for your continued support and sharing of this hub.

      @ Aurelio - All types of sweets that are made during Diwali are common to Bhai Dooj as well since it is a part of the Diwali celebrations. Thanks for coming by.

    • alocsin profile image

      alocsin 4 years ago from Orange County, CA

      I know I seem to be of a one-track eating mind on Indian festivals, but I love the food. So, what types of sweets are common for Bhai Dooj? Voting this Up and Interesting.

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Rajan, I just find this all fascinating. You are a one-man ambassador for your region, and with each article you bring us all closer together. Bravo my friend; keep them coming.

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