ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Just My Luck - I'm Not Irish After All!

Updated on January 13, 2017
Marcy Goodfleisch profile image

Marcy writes about family, home life, parenting, money-saving tips, and many other topics, as well as essays and occasional humor pieces.

Saint Patrick's Day is almost here!

I wish I still thought I was Irish! I miss those days!
I wish I still thought I was Irish! I miss those days!

I was almost Irish! Honest!

Life was so much fun back when I thought I was Irish!

St. Patrick’s Day has always been one of my favorite holidays; what’s not to like about watching people get all goofy, dance Irish jigs all night and drink green beverages? Irish people believe in those cool little leprechauns, and there's a pot of gold at the end of each rainbow. I loved being Irish! I couldn't wait for the 'wearing of the green' each year.

Things are different now, though. These days, St. Patrick's Day isn't the same for me. I just don’t enjoy it the way I did when I was a kid. Everything changed the day my mom took the Irish out of my heritage. You’re probably looking at my name and thinking I’m crazy; clearly, there’s nothing particularly green about my last name.

The Irish Myth came about one day when I was quite young and I asked my mother what country her family had come from. I knew my father's side had come from Germany, but I had no idea about the other side of the family. She was very firm in her answer (although she later claimed not to remember it). Her family was Irish.

Well, as much as I'd always loved my German background, I was thrilled. I thought it was just plain amazing and lucky to be Irish. If you were German, you just couldn't sink your teeth into your heritage the same way you could if you were Irish, and luck wasn't considered a birthright.

People say, "May the luck of the Irish be with you," not "I hope you're as fortunate as all those other Germans!" Who ever heard of German Luck? The Irish have the luck; we have, what, sausage? Okay, we sink our teeth into some good schnitzel now and then, but you know what I mean.

I wholeheartedly embraced being Irish. I went downtown to see the annual St. Paddy's Day parade, and year after year, I dressed in green on March 17th. I had a green jumper, a Kelly green pleated skirt, green-trimmed blouses, a little pin with a shamrock; you name it – if it screamed "Irish!" I bought it and I wore it proudly.

I felt such a sense of belonging when March 17th came around each year, and I lived it up, every minute of the day. It was fun; you can get by with a lot if you’re Irish; if you spout off at someone, just say it’s your Irish Temper and you’ll get a free pass. If you cut up in class, heck, you’re just one of those fun Irish people – the kind everyone loves.

This could have been me in my past life

Say yes to the dress! German style, that is

I love my German heritage, but I sure miss being able to wear the green on St. Patrick's Day.
I love my German heritage, but I sure miss being able to wear the green on St. Patrick's Day.

Being German was fun, but it wasn't as tongue-in-cheek

Let me assure you, you can’t get by with acting up so blatantly if you’re German. If you lose your temper, you’re a hothead. If you laugh and cut up in the wrong place, you’re irresponsible.

There are many great German restaurants and beer gardens, and the folk dances are neat (still, there's something sweet about the Irish Jig). I felt that being part-Irish meant I could let loose now and then. It was a different feel than when I got in touch with my far-too-responsible German genes.

Since the majority of my knowledge about Ireland centered around a hilariously fun holiday, if I thought about being Irish, it took my mind off of business and work. Germans are responsible beyond belief; you can eat off their floors and everything is always ‘just so’ in the kitchen. I didn’t inherit that part of the DNA, by the way.

To be sure, I had a lot of explaining to do every St. Patrick's Day. How could I possibly be Irish, with my last name? You’d think nobody realized their moms had maiden names. Once I explained about my mother’s side of the family, it was all just fine; after all, everyone liked to get into the Irish act on St. Patrick's Day, and just knowing someone who was Irish could bring you good luck on Our Day.

It was confusing to learn I wasn't half Irish

This probably explains a lot more about me than I realize...
This probably explains a lot more about me than I realize...

Family History Time

Do you know your genealogy and heritage?

See results

The truth hits!

Then it happened. One day, as a young adult, I was talking (well, bragging might be a better word) about ‘our’ Irish heritage, and my mom stopped me cold. “We’re not Irish," she said, her voice holding a matter-of-fact, "Whatever made you think that?" tone.

Huh? What do you mean we’re Not Irish? This was the same woman who had told me, a few decades earlier, that her side of the family was Irish. Well, sure, there was little bit of American Indian blood in there, too. But we were Irish! I was sure of it!

Nope. Not so, she said, by this time sounding a bit dismissive. Silly topic; why discuss it? I’m not sure my dear mother realized that in just a few sentences, she had literally wiped out half of my sense of identity.

Okay, I asked, if we’re not Irish, what are we? “I think English,” she said. “Yes, that's it. We're English.”

English? She'd sounded a bit uncertain, so I asked her again, a bit hopefully. But she kept insisting that was it. Not only were we English, she had no memory of telling me we were Irish (I promise I didn't make it up).

In just a few seconds, all that imagined Irish blood drained out of my system. I wasn't familiar with the new genes I'd inherited so quickly and so suddenly. English? I had to try it on for size. Nice people, but no green beer or anything. Not that I wanted to drink beer, I just liked the great sense of fun that imparted. English. Not quite as ready to laugh at anything, but a nice sense of humor.

Still, though – there’s no hugely famous and fun holiday built around being English. No offense to my great British friends here, but your holidays just don’t cut it like St. Patrick’s Day does. Wait a minute – I guess that’s our holidays, now that I know I’m half English. Or half something.

From Irish to English

This was earth shattering. I felt so silly for running around dressed in green all those years. I felt lost. I didn’t know who I was. Sure, I knew I was German, but aside from Oktoberfest (which we never really celebrated at home), and having sauerkraut on New Year’s Day, I didn’t know how you got giddy over being German the same way you could about being Irish. Don’t get me wrong – I’m glad I have my German heritage. But there’s not as much silly partying involved. Kind of a bummer.

As for the English side of me (whatever that might be; it still isn't part of my psyche yet, but it's growing on me), I'm working on things. I've always been a bit charmed by the Royal Family, I'd idolized Princess Di, and of course I think Kate Middleton is smashing (isn't that the word I'm supposed to use? Still learning - sorry!).

The advent of Downton Abbey has given me hope, and I love the great insults we hear on that show, or from icons like Winston Churchill.

I'm trying to form an emotional identification with the idea of my great-great-great (can't count that far back) grandparents coming from England. I've researched my genealogy, and I've learned that several direct ancestors fought in the Revolutionary War; that probably won't endear me to any Brits, but it's a nice thing to know.

It's just that these English ancestors are strangers in my imagination. During my "Almost Irish" years, I had created a fantasyland of ancestors who were all impish, fun-loving, had quick tempers and held a ready smile for everyone. My English ancestors aren't as well-formed yet in my mind. I’m sure they were every bit as as nice as those Irish ancestors I used to imagine. But somehow, they haven't been quite as much fun just yet.

Comments

Submit a Comment
New comments are not being accepted on this article at this time.

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 4 years ago from Planet Earth

    Oh, Randy - I might have guessed you had the Blarney (and other stuff) in your genes! I am so jealous!

    Thanks for reading!

  • Tony Kickass profile image

    Tony Kickass 4 years ago

    WOW, i mean, i didn't expect you to allow my comment so thank you (^_^). Erm, to be honest with you, i "used to" hate the Irish for the superficial reasons listed above but now (man this is sooooo hard to admit) i kinda love having a wee bit o' Irish in me. Before i knew about my roots, i did hate them but now, well let me put it this way. I am now sporting a shamrock tattoo on my shoulder and have began to listen to Irish bands like "The Cranberries". My problem was that i didn't want to be English either (i wanted so bad to be Russian). These days i am almost obsessed with wanting to know more about my Irish ancestors but unfortunately my older family members are dying out fast and i don't keep in touch with the remaining few. I lied when i said that when my auntie told me about the Irish blood that i was annoyed. In actual fact, I WAS ELATED, not to finally know about my Irish side, but to know that i had some foreign blood. I have since changed my thinking about the Irish and i now rejoice in emmersing myself in all things Irish. Thank you sooooooo much for allowing my post. you're a good sport and happy saint Paddies day to you (^_^)xxxxxx

  • Randy Godwin profile image

    Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia

    What!! You're not one of US? lol! From the O'Brady side of the family I'm talking, Marcy. Of course, most can tell I've been hit up side the head with the Blarney Stone a time or two! :o

    A fun read!

    --RG

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 4 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, Tony - oh my goodness! Wow - that experience would truly have been a wake-up call, in so many ways! Thanks for sharing your story!

  • profile image

    Tony Kickass 4 years ago

    Hi there. My story is the complete opposite of yours i'm afraid. So basically, i'm from England, my late mother always assured me that we were 100% English and nothing else. I grew up with a very deep hatred for all things "Irish". i saw them as drunken, pale skinned (yeah i'm racist) sewer rats all scurrying about looking for a potato and wanted absolutely nothing to do with their "breed". Their accents annoyed me, their pale skin disgusted me, their alcohol consumption pissed me off and that highly irritating "rivier dance" bull crap was a joke to me. Then in January 2009, i visited my auntie and we got chatting about things. The conversation quickly turned to my deep interest of ancestry. I said to her that i was going to take a DNA test to find out whether we truly were 100% English, AND THAT WAS WHEN SHE DROPPED HER BOMBSHELL. She looked at me in surprise and said "you don't know??". I said "know what??" she retorted with "we have some irish in us". WELL MY JAW DROPPED TO THE GROUD. With an angry look on my face i said "IRISH?? HUH?? COME AGAIN??" "Yes your Grandad was from county Roscommon". I quickly stood up, made my excuses and left for home. When i got back, i told my mother about this and she replied "OH GOD, I'M SO SORRY SON, I DIDN'T KNOW". I felt as if my life had come to an end so just to make sure, i googled the family name of "Handley" and there it was, County Roscommon, Ireland. Our surname was Irish AND I NEVER EVEN KNEW (thought it was British". To this day i am trying to overcome my deep hatred of the celts and it is an ongoing battle to deal with my "polluted" gene pool" the end........

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 4 years ago from Planet Earth

    Oh, your comments here cracked me up, Sharky! Are we related or something? We also had the Magical Mystery Tour of the American Indian heritage (which I've never been able to document yet). I don't feel so alone now about my ever-changing ancestry!

  • Sharkye11 profile image

    Jayme Kinsey 4 years ago from Oklahoma

    This was such a fun hub! I can completely sympathize to a point too. My grandmother always changes our heritage anytime she tells the story. She can't exactly recall which Native American tribe her mother was part of..." It started with a C" (big help!), and recently she has sworn we were all Italian.

    You look around at over 500 hundred living family members, most with red hair and blue eyes...and you just can't believe you are really Italian.

    Thank goodness for census records...we did trace ourselves back to Ireland and England. Luckily we have only been here four generations, so it made it easier. Be proud of being English! They have the best comedians even if they don't drink green beer!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, Thelma - thanks for the comforting words! You made me feel better - maybe I can at least fake it, right?

  • Thelma Alberts profile image

    Thelma Alberts 5 years ago from Germany

    I really thought, you´re an Irish. The way you tell your story, how it goes on and very funny. I know of so many Irish women who tell a story like you did in this hub. I enjoyed it very much.

    Sorry, you are not Irish. But you can still be funny, generous and lovely being a half German and a half English. All these nationalities have their good qualities. Great hub. Thanks for sharing.

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, Coolenconnections - what a miracle you were able to unravel that mystery! Isn't it a thrill when you find an ancestor and learn more about your heritage? It sounds like you can relate to the subtle shock of realizing you have a completely different heritage than you'd thought! Thanks so much for reading and commenting here!

  • coolenconnections profile image

    Suzanne Coolen 5 years ago from Toronto

    Great Hub!!! As a full time genealogist, I was so frustrated for years because I could not trace my father's side. He had a British name but couldn't find his family anywhere. Long story short, I finally discovered that they had changed their name after arriving in Canada from Sadroschenski to Sankey and that they came from Prussia...not England. All those years searching the wrong name :)

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, JKenny! Thanks for the comforting words! Your authentic name tells me I'm getting good advice from you, so I am indeed going to claim those drops of Irish blood mixed in with my English ancestry! Many thanks for reading and commenting here!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, Trish! I'm so glad you got a laugh out of the hub - I had fun relating that little piece of trauma in my history! I agree; family history is very addictive - I've learned a lot about it in recent years, and it makes our heritage come alive!

  • JKenny profile image

    James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

    Hi Marcy, I'm truly sorry that your mother dropped such a bombshell on you. It's definitely a big come down to find out your English. We don't really celebrate St. George's Day that much, although there are signs that it will change soon. I wouldn't recommend Morris dancing, it's just a load of blokes dancing around with handkerchiefs, and cricket is probably one of the most boring sports on the planet, along with snooker.

    If you're English, then there is a good chance you have some Irish blood in you. A large portion of us, over here have Irish or Celtic in us somewhere.

    You might be able to tell from my name that I have Irish ancestors, what's more my middle name is Patrick, so that's a bonus. I also have Belgian and Portuguese in me, so that's pretty cool. Voted up and shared.

  • Trish_M profile image

    Tricia Mason 5 years ago from The English Midlands

    Hi :)

    That was really good ~ really entertaining!

    I'm English, by the way, but with quite a few Irish genes floating around ~ as well as Welsh, Greek and other lines.

    Family history is very interesting ~ and quite addictive.

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thanks, Jools - I'm more and more convinced I must be part Irish somewhere back in those family tree roots. Sure hope so! I appreciate your comments!

  • Jools99 profile image

    Jools99 5 years ago from North-East UK

    Marcy, don't give up hope on at least a drop or two of Irish blood - one thing I have discovered in doing my family tree is that my family were a bit more mobile that my own generation and moved all over the place. Consequently, I am English but with some Welsh and Scottish thrown in over the generations. I bet if I delved further I'd turn up an Irish ancestor as well! And you should still celebrate on 17th March...just to be on the safe side!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Your heritage sounds greatm Judi - and I'm a bit envious that you grew up so near where your longtime ancestors were from. Thank you for reading and commenting!

  • Judi Bee profile image

    Judith Hancock 5 years ago from UK

    Oh dear, what a shock! I'm definitely part Irish, part Welsh and part English. As I have been brought up in England I tend to identify most with my English blood, although we lived very near Wales, so I love that part of my heritage too. The Irish part is more distant, can't say I think about it too much. I did enjoy my visit to Eire though, it's a beautiful country.

    Voted up etc

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    LOL! Oh gosh, Susan - I know the feeling! Maybe we're cousins or something! Thanks for the comments, I had to laugh at our similar stories!

  • Just Ask Susan profile image

    Susan Zutautas 5 years ago from Ontario, Canada

    I read your hub the other day and meant to comment, so I'm back. This hub hits home with me as my father always told me that his mother was from Ireland. After my Dad passed I was going through some paperwork only to discover that she was actually born in England. But I still say I'm Irish anyway :) Enjoyed your story.

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thanks, EuroCafeAuLait - yes, it was a very odd feeling to have a huge piece of what I thought my identity was just vanish in a few words! The German side of my family also Anglicized our name - it's made it difficult to trace ancestors in Germany. I'm sure the name change was somewhat related to what was acceptable at the time.

    Yes - I plan to keep on with the green! Thanks for commenting!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    I think you're right, Horatio - I'm going to love the English heritage once it feels real to me. But I've also decided to adopt myself into being Irish - at least once a year!

  • EuroCafeAuLait profile image

    Anastasia Kingsley 5 years ago from Croatia, Europe

    I agree with many statements here about the methods and madness of either not knowing or intentionally hiding one's cultural identity. (Why, I will never completely understand...) My grandparents kept their Croatian names, but the next generation Anglicized their names (from Kinkusic to Kingsley) during the McCarthy era. In those days it was uncool to be a foreigner. Guess it's more common than I originally thought. Great Hub, Interesting!! And by the way, I'd keep on with the green...

  • Horatio Plot profile image

    Horatio Plot 5 years ago from Bedfordshire, England.

    Great hub Marcy. I understand how you felt about losing your Irishness. Although I'm English, my father was Irish, from Dunlavin in County Wicklow, near Dublin. It's something that stays in your heart. So when England play Ireland at football(soccer) or Rugby, although I'm rooting for England I'm secretly pleased if Ireland win. But don't be too sad, being English is all good too.

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thanks, Patty - I'm sorry you had such confusing information from your own mother. I think my mother just came up with an answer to one of my many questions without thinking about it to any degree. Apparently, some later research showed the true lineage, and she forgot the Irish fable I'd heard! Thanks for reading and commenting!

  • Patty Inglish, MS profile image

    Patty Inglish 5 years ago from North America

    This is an intriguing Hub and I wonder why your mother claimed Irish heritage to you and took it back later. My own mother told me many stories about both sides of the family and as an adult doing research in a few topics, I found out that every story was false.

    In my case, stories were fabricated to hide Native American heritage, lack of education among some of the family that came over from the UK, and several places family members had lived. Unfortunately, my mother used the information in her stories to bully people and years later, I was angry and embarrassed with the truth and what the falsehoods had done to people.

    Rated Up, by the way!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thanks for your thoughtful and informative comments, MizBejabbers! I like the Heinz 57 idea - that's probably a good one for many people!

  • MizBejabbers profile image

    MizBejabbers 5 years ago

    Marcy, you done good, as they say here in the South. Voted you up. I do understand about your mother's offhand remark. When I used to ask my father about his family he would say that we were "Scotch-Arsh". That gave me the impression that we were Irish, but I didn't know where the "Scotch" came to play. Then I found out that the Irish wouldn't have anything to do with the Scots that settled in Ireland. Oh well, I still wear green on St. Pattie's day anyway.

    Thanks to generous relatives who've shared their research, we have several family lines going back to four countries in Northern Europe, including one German Jew back to 1392, and Native American ancestry. So when anyone asks, I just tell them I'm Heinz 57.

    @J.S. Matthew: Don't give up just because you can't find the Native American. I have NA from all great-grandparents, and I can't document any of it. The Native Americans hid out and passed for white as soon as they could. They were not allowed to become U.S. citizens until around 1926. I would have to look up the exact year.

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thank you, EuroCafeAuLait - I appreciate your nice compliments!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    LOL! Thanks, Ruth - now I can really claim St. Patrick! Yay!

  • EuroCafeAuLait profile image

    Anastasia Kingsley 5 years ago from Croatia, Europe

    Hi Marcy,

    Fun, hilarious and completely understandable! Thanks for sharing, voted up and funny!

  • profile image

    Ruth 5 years ago

    Hi Marcy, You know that St. Patrick was FROM England, but he came to Ireland the first time as a slave the second time as a bishop. Guess some of the best Irish folks are English too.

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, Dawn - yep, the German heritage is to blame for your sauerkraut fixation! I love it, and it's actually one of my comfort foods. Thanks for your comments!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    What an honor! Thanks, Millionaire Tips! I am so glad you enjoyed the hub - and I appreciate you kind words.

  • Dawn Conklin profile image

    Dawn Conklin 5 years ago from New Jersey, USA

    You did a great job with this hub! Sorry you found out you are not Irish. I have a lot of German in me also, but I honestly do not celebrate German holidays. It might explain why most of our family loves sauerkraut tho :)

  • Millionaire Tips profile image

    Shasta Matova 5 years ago from USA

    Hi Marcy, I came back to let you know that I have included this hub in my favorites list this week. (March 4). Congratulations! You've shown your culture shock so well here.

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Top 'o the mornin' to you, Mark - and now I know where you got your killer sense of humor!

    Yes, my mom's unintentional mistake sure sent me down the wring identity path. No wonder things have been confusing ever since. Thanks for reading and commenting!

  • Mark Ewbie profile image

    Mark Ewbie 5 years ago from Euroland

    Ah well Marcy, if isn't yourself coming out with some blarney. I have some Irish blood in me, mixed with some English - and I switch sides as it suits me. Generally to moan about the 'other' lot.

    I do love the premise of this page, an offhand remark by your mother - on such things dreams are made.

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    I'm envious of the work you've done on family history, pmccray. Your history sounds rich and fascinating. I have several generations done, but then I hit roadblocks. Whenever I go back to work on it again, though, I find new information. Family history is important in my church, so we have many resources available. Thanks for reading and commenting!

  • pmccray profile image

    pmccray 5 years ago from Utah

    I am working on my family tree and have been since 2000. It's a work in progress, but I'm so loving it. Like working a giant jigsaw puzzle, and being an Afro American you run into all kinds of road blocks. These blocks only peak my interest and drive my determination. During my search I've found that I have, Italian, English, West Indian, American Indian and African in my makeup. It is truly a glorious quest. Voted up, marked useful and interesting.

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Glad you liked the hub, drbj - and your comment made me laugh! Thanks for reading!

  • drbj profile image

    drbj and sherry 5 years ago from south Florida

    Faith and begorra, Marcy. Not an Irish person of the 'auld sod'? Do not despair - my lips are sealed. Loved your hub. Still smiling.

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Ha! Thanks, Jackie! Tally Ho - that's great! Thanks for reading and commenting!

  • Jackie Lynnley profile image

    Jackie Lynnley 5 years ago from The Beautiful South

    Well you know in America in the beginning there was English. Almost all, so tally ho. Fun read, thanks!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Oh, thank you for clarifying that! I was confused, too - so glad to know there's a distinction. I guess my family is just English. I am glad to know the right way to refer to things! Thanks, Nell!

  • Nell Rose profile image

    Nell Rose 5 years ago from England

    Hi, Just came back to read, and one thing I have noticed that a lot of Americans get confused about is Brits, Britain is the whole of the british isles. when people say brits, they are including England Wales Scotland and Northern Ireland. so England isn't called British, as its all of us, okay? I just thought I would mention that as everybody seems to call the English brits, lol!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Oh, that's one of my major comfort foods, Millionare Tios! Okay, this Brit thing is sounding better all the time. Especially if I still get to be Irish at least one day out of the year. Thanks for reading and commenting!

  • Millionaire Tips profile image

    Shasta Matova 5 years ago from USA

    Marcy, this is so funny. I fully understand the fun of being Irish. Even though I am sure that I am 0% Irish, I celebrate St. Patrick's Day all the same. The Irish can't hoard it! And I am sure that there is Irish blood in there somewhere, if you look hard enough. You can get a DNA test and prove it. Who knows, you may find other fun cultures in there as well. As a Brit, you can have Shepherd's Pie.

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    I think you're right, Rebecca - I feel so much better after hearing from the Latent Irish Support Group here!

  • RebeccaWhitman profile image

    RebeccaWhitman 5 years ago

    What a shocker for you, and to be English, the very ones Ireland has fought so much against...tough! I have little to no Irish blood but love Ireland and all her heritage here and abroad. Ive been priviledged to go there (see post coming soon) and have spent most of my life perfecting an Irish accent and swooning over a romantisized version of being Irish. St. Patrick's Day is the one day of a year we ALL are Irish; I wear green in great pride that day. The wonderful twist to the story is now Im dating an Irish American and will one day, hopefully, become Irish in name.;) Another great twist to the story, I went on ancestry.com and found a distant relative with Irish blood. Now my Irish bits feel justified, lol...hey, maybe you should check out your family on ancestry.com.

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Maybe we can get our German friends here on HP together and celebrate our mutual heritage, alocsin! Thanks for stopping by and commenting!

  • alocsin profile image

    alocsin 5 years ago from Orange County, CA

    I can relate Marcy. I have German ancestry as well but think being Irish is more fun. Either way, genealogy is a great hobby. Voting this Up and Interesting.

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    LOL! Thanks, Noreen! I'll probably stick to sparkling water, but I'm definitely getting some green food coloring to add to it this year!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thanks for your kind comments, Pameal99! We have found a few surprises, too. It is all so fascinating!

  • bell du jour profile image

    bell du jour 5 years ago from Ireland

    Hi Marcy, I really enjoyed reading your witty and brilliantly written hub:-) As Daisy said, everyone is Irish on Paddys day! Don't stop celebrating on March 17th and don't stop drinking the green beer!

    Lá Fhéile Pádraig!

    Noreen

  • Pamela99 profile image

    Pamela Oglesby 5 years ago from United States

    I truly enjoyed your hub. As an avid genealogist researcher I have found many surprises through the years. You probably do have some Irish in your background somewhere. I have a bit, but more English also, and some other Swedish. Awesome hub!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, Flora - you're right; it's fascinating to trace your heritage and then picture them in the era in which they lived. I find myself asking what they did daily, how life was, etc. History becomes more real (as long as you're in the right country - I'm still working on that part!). There is a wealth of online information now that has been validly documented through original records and it's available to anyone.

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, Moonlake - I don't know that I'll ever unravel why she told me that (maybe I was asking a ton of questions that day and she did it to shut me up and keep me occupied?). When the family genealogy was researched accurately, the earliest ancestors we could find who came to the U.S. were from England. I'm still a believer that someone back there had to be Irish, though!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hey, Deborhah - being half Cherokee would also be fun - really neat movies and beautiful jewelry. I could go for that. Thanks for your comments!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, Daisy - I like the idea of spreading out your birthday. Instead of just a birthday, call it your Birthday Season. You get to celebrate for at least a month that way, right? Thanks for your comments!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thanks, AEvans - I am very reassured to know I can pass! Thank you for reading and commenting!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, Marcoujor - I will take you up on that! I like the idea of declaring our Irishness one day each year. Sold! Thanks for your comment!

  • FloraBreenRobison profile image

    FloraBreenRobison 5 years ago

    I am 3/8 British Isles (all 4 U.K. Countries), 1/4 Italian, 1/4 Scandinavian (Sweedish and Norweigan), and 1/8 some combination of German and French. I didn't know I was French until after my grandfather died. I thought my great-grandmother had been 100% German, but no. However, I don't know how the two nationalities were divided with her parents. She was the only one of my great grandparents who was born in North America. Everyone else was born in Europe.

    So I'm a melting pot.

    It is fun to know your ancestry, isn't it?

  • moonlake profile image

    moonlake 5 years ago from America

    While checking up on my family I found out they were Irish at least that's what it looks like. It explained lots about my Dad and his brothers.

    The Indian everyone talked about I can't seem to find at least not on the side where they say it is.

    I enjoyed reading your story maybe your mother is wrong and has forgotten what she is. My mother does that all the time.

  • Deborah Brooks profile image

    Deborah Brooks Langford 5 years ago from Brownsville,TX

    this is so entertaining I am so sorry you are not Irish.. it would be fun to be Irish.. I laugh all the way through this hub.

    I am 1/2 English and 1/3 Cherokee Indian but I don't know what else.. it is a mystery.. LOL

    voted way up

    debbie

  • Daisy Mariposa profile image

    Daisy Mariposa 5 years ago from Orange County (Southern California)

    Marcy,

    What a fun, well-written article! I thoroughly enjoyed reading it.

    Everyone is Irish on St. Paddy's Day...even me! I was born at 12:10am on March 18th...10 minutes after the holiday ended. I celebrate my birthday on the 17th and the 18th of March.

  • AEvans profile image

    Julianna 5 years ago from SomeWhere Out There

    Lololo! From Irish to English and a little bit of German too, you look like you could pass for Irish so enjoy and celebrate. It is okay with me! Thumbs up! :)

  • marcoujor profile image

    Maria Jordan 5 years ago from Jeffersonville PA

    Marcy,

    I am 100% Irish one day a year and you can be as well...

    You are lovely, as is your writing style! Voted UP & FAB.

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Oh good! Thank you, J.S. Matthew! I'm feeling more and more legit with every comment here! Thanks for reading, and for your nice comments!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Oh, do share that story, Ardie! It sounds worthy of another hub!

    By the way, I have a really dear friend whose parents passed away when she was still quite young. Her mother's family was from Portugal, and her dad was from the U.S. Just a few years ago, she learned she was adopted! She is half German - and had a similar sense of 'Who am I?" after she found out.

    Thanks for reading and commenting!

  • J.S.Matthew profile image

    JS Matthew 5 years ago from Massachusetts, USA

    This is a beautiful Hub! I like your sense of humor and writing style. I am Irish, and French and Portuguese that I know of. When I was young I was told that I was Native American. When I got older I tried to research my heritage, and as it turns out, I could find no trace of Native in my family. I was very sad because I identified with the spiritual way of life of the Native Americans on the East Coast of North America. What I learned though, was that even though the blood was not in my veins, the spirit was and that is what counts! Great Hub and you can be an honorary Irishwoman! Voted up and SHARING!

    JSMatthew~

  • Ardie profile image

    Sondra 5 years ago from Neverland

    Oh man Marcy! hahah Im sorry - I don't mean to laugh. How awful to have part of your identity wiped clean with a few dismissive sentences. One day I will share the story of why I thought I was Italian for a month or so :)

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thanks, Cloverleaf! I'm going to hold you to that pot of gold promise! LOL! I'm glad you enjoyed the hub!

  • Cloverleaf profile image

    Cloverleaf 5 years ago from Calgary, AB, Canada

    Hi Marcy! I felt quite bad for you when you discovered that you weren't Irish. But there's no reason why you can't still kick up your heels on St Paddy's Day. And I just know that there's a pot of gold for you at the end of the rainbow anyway :)

    Voted up and awesome!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    I like that idea, JayeWisdom - we can all have an Irish state of mind (like the New York State of Mind song!). That works for me! Thanks for reading and commenting!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Oh,a green puddle! I love that image! Thanks for reading and commenting, homesteadbound! I hope everyone reads your hub on March Holidays - I've linked to it in this hub.

  • JayeWisdom profile image

    Jaye Denman 5 years ago from Deep South, USA

    Marcy...Can I relate to your strong desire to be Irish! My paternal grandmother was Irish, and, although my other forebears were a hodgepodge of Scots, English, Austrian and German, I always identified with that small part of my heritage that was Irish.

    In addition to loving St. Paddy's Day, I read numerous books about the potato famine that decimated the poor Irish and ached for the people who starved or left the Emerald Isle in order to avoid starvation. I just plain FELT Irish!

    In spite of knowing that my DNA contains a lot more than what I got from my grandmother's family, I still feel more Irish than anything else. Perhaps "Irish-ness" is a state of mind, eh?

  • homesteadbound profile image

    Cindy Murdoch 5 years ago from Texas

    How fun! I laughed out loud when you said all the Irish blood drained out of you. I pictured in my mind, you standing in a green puddle. I totally enjoyed this hub.

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thanks for the kind words, sholland! As with you, I enjoy learning about genealogy. It was just a bit disconcerting to have to remake my idea of my heritage!

  • sholland10 profile image

    Susan Holland 5 years ago from Southwest Missouri

    Hi Marcy! I know on one side I am Scottish and on the other, I think, we are English, but for years I thought it was Irish. There are some Dutch mixed in there too. I am so interested in Scottish and Irish history, but just recently found out about the English side. I have always had great interest in Tudor history. Maybe there is a reason for that... I love genealogy!

    I loved your hub! Votes and shared! :-)

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, Nell! Oh no - I have to figure out what PART of England we're from? I love the idea of the red cross on my face - that's almost as much fun as all the green stuff. I will look up Morris Dancing - I promise. I also hear there's a Guy Fawkes Day or something (not sure if I spelled it right), but he sounds intriguing.

    Okay - I will turn to you for proper training in being a Fun Brit!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Ha! Thanks, Sunnie Day! Don't despair - Will assures us we all have some Irish blood somewhere. So I'm headed back to the store for the green wardrobe stuff again! Thanks for reading and commenting!

  • Nell Rose profile image

    Nell Rose 5 years ago from England

    Hi, Marcy, welcome to the Englishness! lol! let me fill you in on it a bit;

    We are known, and have the best sense of humor more than any other brit even the irish

    We celebrate st. georges day by wearing a red cross on our faces, usually followed by a rather large dragon, whichever one of your friends wants to wear it, fine, as long as its not you! haha! hot costume, phew!

    we have something called Morris Dancing, you have to look it up, its hilarious!

    We get on with everybody, well most of the time!

    and all the rumors of us being stiff upper lip, like you see on the tv is so not true! lol! the upper class are like that, but not us commoners! we are just normal everyday people, I think! haha!

    Oh nearly forgot, all depending on where you originate from you could be Celtic from the south of england, viking from the north of england, or french if you can trace your family back to good old william the conquerer! so you see, we are a mixture, you never know, you may be a direct descendant of Boudicca the red headed celtic queen who kicked the romans butt! haha! so there you are, not just little on english, if I can think of anything else I will get back to you! lol!

  • profile image

    Sunnie Day 5 years ago

    OH Marcy...This was so funny..I enjoyed every word, laughing all the way..Thanks for the smiles...Humm... I am Irish and French..now I am a bit scared..I know the French part for sure without a doubt but...I better get the Irish part in writing..haha

    Thanks again! Up up up!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thanks, Audra Leigh! I'm so glad you enjoyed it!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    I like your story, too, Melovy! You should write a hub about it! It's fun to imagine everyone who went before us. Will assures me I can still claim being Irish, so I'm getting my jig back in shape!

  • profile image

    iamaudraleigh 5 years ago

    Awesome and original writing here!!! I would vote up twice if I could!!!

  • Melovy profile image

    Yvonne Spence 5 years ago from UK

    Sorry to hear you’re not Irish after all but this was fun to read!

    I apparently have traces of Spanish armada in my blood and I’m sticking to that story because there’s no way we can trace our ancestry far enough back to disprove it!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Awww - thanks, Will! I will go look for some green to wear, now, and I feel better that I can wear it in good conscience!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thanks, davenmidtown! And thank you for posting the question! I'm kind of sad I'm not Irish, too - but I am getting used to the idea of being - whatever the heck I am . . . (smile!). Thanks for reading and commenting!

  • WillStarr profile image

    WillStarr 5 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

    Most of us have Irish in our blood if we go back far enough. My grandmother was a Reilly, and her parents came from the Emerald Isle! In fact, her father was an excommunicated priest who fell in love with her mother, (or so the family legend goes!)

    You are Irish somehow, lass!

    ^_^

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    I love Claddagh rings - they're very regal and meaningful. I confess I don't know as much as I'd like to know about Ireland. I think the big attraction for me was the ability to be so proud of my would-be heritage on St. Patrick's Day! It's a beautiful country, though, from what I know.

  • davenmidtown profile image

    David Stillwell 5 years ago from Sacramento, California

    What a great hub... I laughed, rooted for you and then was kind of sad you weren't Irish... Totally enjoyed this from top to bottom. Am happy my question inspired this hub.

  • Anamika S profile image

    Anamika S 5 years ago from Mumbai - Maharashtra, India

    I have an Irish Claddagh ring, that's all I know about Irish. Interesting Hub... Voted up!

Click to Rate This Article