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How to Make a Death Star Pinata Using Papier-Mâché

Updated on August 11, 2016
Brainy Bunny profile image

Brainy Bunny is the mother of two. Together they read, craft, and play games for fun.

Death Star Piñata

The Death Egg (oops, I mean Death Star) is ready for smashing.
The Death Egg (oops, I mean Death Star) is ready for smashing. | Source

If you are a person of the male persuasion between the ages of 3 and 43 (or live with one), you probably instinctively understand the need for a Death Star piñata. Some days you just have to smash something, am I right? Multitask and use your aggressive impulses to save the galaxy by whacking a piñata shaped like the Death Star until it explodes. Plus, you get candy!

While I first attempted this project for my son's 6th birthday party, it is suitable for many occasions. Celebrate the release of the 3D versions of the Star Wars films! Honor the completion of your Jedi training! Observe your favorite holidays with a Star Wars theme! Bring a Death Star piñata to the office to celebrate your boss' being laid off! . . . See? The Death Star piñata is always appropriate.

The basic tools of papier-mâché: flour, newspaper, and a balloon.
The basic tools of papier-mâché: flour, newspaper, and a balloon. | Source

First, gather the necessary ingredients. You'll need flour, water, newspaper, a balloon, string, gray paint, and a black permanent marker. (For a rounder shape, use a punching balloon or a thin beach ball rather than a regular balloon.)

Mix up paste from one part sifted flour to five parts boiling water water.
Mix up paste from one part sifted flour to five parts boiling water water. | Source
Pour it into a flat dish to cool (and scoop out the lumps).
Pour it into a flat dish to cool (and scoop out the lumps). | Source

Making the paste

Take a small saucepan and fill it with one quart of water. Bring it to a boil. Take one cup of sifted flour and stir it into one cup of cold water until smooth. Then pour the mixture into the boiling water. Let it boil gently for three minutes, stirring all the while to prevent lumps. If you don't like the smell, add a dash of cinnamon.

When it's done, allow it to cool for a few minutes, and then pour it into a shallow bowl. I used a clean metal paint tray, which was absolutely perfect.

If your paste is not perfectly smooth, don't fret. Pick out any large lumps with your spoon, and chalk the small lumps up to "character".

Rip strips of newspaper.
Rip strips of newspaper. | Source

Stripping for fun

Now it's time to strip! Strips of newspaper, that is. This is an easy job for kids to do while you're making the paste. Have them tear full lengths of a broadsheet newspaper about 1" wide, and then tear them in half across the fold.

Now put your lips together and blow

Every papier-mâché project needs an armature, and yours will be a beach ball. (I did it with a balloon, but using a beach ball will keep your Death Star from looking like a malevolent Hersey's Kiss instead.) Blow it up fully.

Drag your newspaper strip through the paste.
Drag your newspaper strip through the paste. | Source
Smooth the pasty strips onto the balloon.
Smooth the pasty strips onto the balloon. | Source

Time to get messy

Once your beach-ball armature is ready, drag your newspaper strips through the paste and rub them onto the ball. Try not to overlap too much at this stage, but cover the ball fully except for a small hole at the bottom that you will use to put the candy in.

Attach a string and allow to dry (for several days, if necessary).
Attach a string and allow to dry (for several days, if necessary). | Source

Don't forget the string

You'll need to be able to hang the piñata in order to smash it, so tie a piece of string into a loop. At the top of your Death Star, smooth a strip of papier-mâché over the bottom of the loop and press it on. Make sure the rest of the loop hangs free.

Now let it dry. This may take several days. Repeat the process with two more layers of newspaper strips and paste.

When the papier-mâché is fully dry and hard, snip a hole in the balloon through the space that you left open for putting the candy in.
When the papier-mâché is fully dry and hard, snip a hole in the balloon through the space that you left open for putting the candy in. | Source
The balloon will shrivel up inside, leaving a cavity just begging to be filled with candy!
The balloon will shrivel up inside, leaving a cavity just begging to be filled with candy! | Source

Now snip!

Once the papier-mâché is completely dry, use a sharp scissors to cut a whole in your armature. If you use a balloon, it will shrink up on its own. If you use a beach ball, you may need to gently insert your hand into the hole and peel it away from the sides if it sticks.

Next comes the painting.
Next comes the painting. | Source
Draw details with a black paint marker.
Draw details with a black paint marker. | Source

Paint the town . . .

Or the Death Star, as the case may be. Use silver acrylic craft paint and a foam brush for easy painting and easy clean-up. Hold the piñata steady by putting it into a shallow bowl. (You don't want it rolling all over the table and leaving silver streaks.) Let it dry completely before handling it. This will take somewhere between a few hours and overnight.

Details, details

With a black paint marker, draw in as many details of the Death Star as you have patience for. As you can see, I went for a minimalist look, with simple outlined rectangles to give the impression of a thriving city of evil. If you are a better artist than I (and it would be hard not to be), you can get much more detailed. It helps to have a photo to work from; I sat in front of a picture on my computer as I drew.

Stuff with candy and small toys.
Stuff with candy and small toys. | Source

Here comes the best part

Fill it with candy!

Don't forget to tape up the bottom with duct tape to keep the candy inside until you're ready to smash it. Hang it from a broom handle at the party, and let guests have at it with their lightsabers or a small wooden baseball bat. Stand back when it finally breaks, or you will be trampled. Seriously, a rugby scrum has nothing on a pack of sugar-starved kindergartners on a quest for mini chocolate bars.

Tips

  • Start this project a week before you need to use the pinata. Papier-mache can take a long time to dry, especially if you live in a humid and/or cold climate.
  • Cover your table with more newspaper and wear a smock or old clothes. This is a messy project, especially if you let children help.

This is what papier-mâché looks like on the inside after it's been broken.
This is what papier-mâché looks like on the inside after it's been broken. | Source

For the Mess-Averse

If building a pinata from scratch with papier-mache is just too much for you, check out your local big box store or party store to see if one of their pinatas can be repurposed. If you can find a spherical pinata (intended to be a basketball or a globe, for instance), you can paint it gray and add some details using a black permanent marker. Voila! Instant death star with (almost) none of the mess. If you can't find one the right shape (as I couldn't, on my recent trips), use your imagination. I found a large bipedal lizard-shaped piñata that could easily have been painted brown and used as Chewbacca, for instance. However, I couldn't think of any good reason for the little boys at my son's birthday party to be smacking a Wookiee around with their lightsabers, so we didn't go with that idea.

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    • theclevercat profile image

      Rachel Vega 5 years ago from Massachusetts

      Wowie! This Hub is wonderful. Great pictures and engaging writing make this one beautiful and awesome. I also voted up.

      Did you run into any issues with the drying? Maybe set it in a sunny window our apply low heat from a hair dryer if things are taking longer than expected.

    • Brainy Bunny profile image
      Author

      Brainy Bunny 5 years ago from Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania

      Thanks, clevercat! I did have a little trouble with the drying. Ultimately I placed the papier-mâché balloon in front of our sunny patio doors, and that really sped things up.

    • veggie-mom profile image

      veggie-mom 5 years ago

      Yay for paper-mache & homemade pinatas (and of course Star Wars, too) !I am a mom to two boys who love superheroes & Star Wars. Last year, we made a batman pinata for my son's sixth birthday party. It was so much fun making the pinata & the kids at the party had a blast breaking it open. I wrote about it in my hub, A Birthday Party for Batman, if you get a chance to check it out. Voted up & awesome!

    • Brainy Bunny profile image
      Author

      Brainy Bunny 5 years ago from Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania

      Thank you, Veggie-mom. I'll check out your hub right away. Although my son's birthday party was just a few weeks ago, there's always next year to gather ideas for!

    • profile image

      susanm23b 5 years ago

      I love this! It's super cute--if a Death Star can be cute. I have girls and they are huge Star Wars fans. They are too old (teens) for the pinata birthday party--but we might make one of these just for fun! When I show them this hub, I'm sure they'll want to :) Voted up and shared :)

    • Brainy Bunny profile image
      Author

      Brainy Bunny 5 years ago from Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania

      Thank you, susanm23b. Your girls may be past the age of the piñata birthday party, but they're never too old to hit stuff and eat candy! :-) If they don't want to make it for themselves, maybe a kid they babysit or someone else in the neighborhood might appreciate one.

    • mattdigiulio profile image

      mattdigiulio 4 years ago

      Love Pinatas, and love Star Wars, this is a great hub for me! Thanks for this post, it's well-written and fun.

    • Brainy Bunny profile image
      Author

      Brainy Bunny 4 years ago from Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania

      Thanks, Matt! Making the piñata was actually a lot of fun. I highly recommend it if you have time on your hands.

    • laurathegentleman profile image

      laurathegentleman 4 years ago from Chapel Hill, NC

      This is perfect for my brothers birthday party! (No, really! .... Ok, ok... No. I really just wanna make one for me...)

    • Brainy Bunny profile image
      Author

      Brainy Bunny 4 years ago from Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania

      Ha! I have heard the same thing from so many girls, you wouldn't believe it. You should totally make one for yourself, because it's super fun to do AND to eat the candy afterwards. Go ahead, I give you permission!

    • Greekgeek profile image

      Ellen 4 years ago from California

      Speaking as a girl who liked to "kill" my neighbor's Barbies with my Darth Vader action figure, I adore this idea... but think the first sentence needs editing. ;)

    • Brainy Bunny profile image
      Author

      Brainy Bunny 4 years ago from Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania

      Ha! You got me, Greekgeek. In my family, it's only the males who are Star Wars fans, but I have come to recognize that it's a big world out there, and there are tons of female fans, too, even though I don't see the appeal. (I get my geek on in other ways.) So maybe I'll fix the hook to my article if I can think of something new, but if I don't, rest assured that I still support your right to geek out in whatever way you choose! :-)

    • KrystalD profile image

      KrystalD 4 years ago from Los Angeles

      This is a really awesome hub! Your step by step instructions seem so simple that even a teacher could do it ;)

      I am so excited to work closely with you in the apprentice program because I can tell I have a lot to learn from you :)

    • Brainy Bunny profile image
      Author

      Brainy Bunny 4 years ago from Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania

      Ha! You made me laugh, KrystalD. My kids and I had a lot of fun with this project, and depending on what age kids you teach, you might be able to adapt it for classroom use. (As long as your kids are allowed to get messy!)

      I'm looking forward to starting the apprenticeship, too -- we'll all be learning together!

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